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[Age-dependent characteristics of blood plasma oxidative and antioxidative reactions to the hypobaric hypoxia and different duration of the photoperiod]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81093
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2006;52(3):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Iasins'ka O V
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2006;52(3):84-9
Date
2006
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - blood
Altitude
Animals
Anoxia - blood
Atmospheric Pressure
Catalase - blood
Lipid Peroxides - blood
Male
Photoperiod
Rats
Superoxide Dismutase - blood
Abstract
The effect of hypobaric hypoxia (6 hours everyday 7 days) under different duration of the photoperiod on oxidative (malonic aldehide and dienal conjugates) and antioxidative (catalase and superoxide dismutase activity) systems in the blood plasma of adult and infantile albino male rats were investigated. It is concluded that there is an age-dependent reaction of oxidative and antioxidative systems to the combined action of hypobaric hypoxia and different duration of the photoperiod. Reactions of pro- and antioxidative systems of adult and infantile rats were approximately the same under the conditions of a long-term darkness-and hypoxia but in the infants they were less manifested under the combined action of hypoxia and natural light or long-term lightening. Hypoxia combined with all varieties of photoperiod activate antioxidative system in both age groups but only in infantile rats the process of peroxidation was reducing.
PubMed ID
16909761 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily emergency department visits for headache in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158601
Source
Headache. 2008 Mar;48(3):417-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Headache. 2008 Mar;48(3):417-23
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Atmospheric Pressure
Canada
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Headache - etiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
Many studies have indicated that weather can trigger headache. Here we propose a new methodological approach to assess the relationship between weather, ambient air pollution, and emergency department (ED) visits for this condition.
To examine the associations between ED visits for headache and selected meteorological and air pollution factors.
A hierarchical clusters design was used to study 10,497 ED visits for headache (ICD-9: 784) that occurred at a Montreal hospital between 1997 and 2002. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to create Poisson models for the clustered counts of visits for headache.
Statistically significant positive associations were observed between the number of ED visits for headache and the atmospheric pressure for all and for female visits for 1-day and 2-day lagged exposures. The percentage increase in daily ED female visits was 4.1% (95% CI: 2.0, 6.2), 3.4% (95% CI: 1.4, 5.6), and 2.2% (95% CI: 1.4, 5.6) for current day, 1-day and 2-day lagged exposure to SO(2), respectively, for an increase of an interquartile range (IQR) of 2.4 ppb. The percentage increase was also statistically significant for current day and 1-day lagged exposure to NO(2) and CO for all and for female visits.
Presented findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for headache are correlated to weather conditions and ambient air pollution - to atmospheric pressure and exposure to SO(2), NO(2), CO, and PM(2.5). An increase in levels of these factors is associated with an increase in the number of ED visits for headache.
PubMed ID
18302702 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Aerosp Med. 1966 Feb;37(2):178-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb 1966
Source
Aerosp Med. 1966 Feb;37(2):178-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1966

Amplitude modulation of sound from wind turbines under various meteorological conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264950
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan;135(1):67-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Conny Larsson
Olof Öhlund
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan;135(1):67-73
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Atmospheric Pressure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humidity
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Power Plants
Renewable Energy
Sound Spectrography
Sweden
Temperature
Time Factors
Wind
Abstract
Wind turbine (WT) sound annoys some people even though the sound levels are relatively low. This could be because of the amplitude modulated "swishing" characteristic of the turbine sound, which is not taken into account by standard procedures for measuring average sound levels. Studies of sound immission from WTs were conducted continually between 19 August 2011 and 19 August 2012 at two sites in Sweden. A method for quantifying the degree and strength of amplitude modulation (AM) is introduced here. The method reveals that AM at the immission points occur under specific meteorological conditions. For WT sound immission, the wind direction and sound speed gradient are crucial for the occurrence of AM. Interference between two or more WTs could probably enhance AM. The mechanisms by which WT sound is amplitude modulated are not fully understood.
PubMed ID
24437746 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127615
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2012 Nov;56(6):1045-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Laura Hiltunen
Reija Ruuhela
Aini Ostamo
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kirsi Suominen
Timo Partonen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. laura.hiltunen@thl.fi
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2012 Nov;56(6):1045-53
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmospheric Pressure
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Weather
Abstract
The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods (P?
PubMed ID
22278192 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264718
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Apr;22(7):4806-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Bernabé Ballesteros
Antonio A Ceacero-Vega
Elena Jiménez
José Albaladejo
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Apr;22(7):4806-19
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry
Atmospheric Pressure
Chlorine - chemistry
Cyclohexanes - chemistry
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Hydroxyl Radical - chemistry
Solid Phase Microextraction
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Temperature
Abstract
As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298?±?2 K and 720?±?5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11?±?0.16), (2.89?±?0.16), (2.89?±?0.26), and (2.61?±?0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18?±?0.12), (1.49?±?0.16), (1.41?±?0.15), and (1.77?±?0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed mechanism for ring-retaining product channels is proposed to justify the observed reaction products. The global tropospheric lifetimes estimated from the reported OH- and Cl-rate coefficients show that the main removal path for the investigated methylcyclohexanes is the reaction with OH radicals. But in marine environments, after sunrise, Cl reactions become more important in the tropospheric degradation. Thus, the estimated lifetimes range from 16 to 24 h for the reactions of the OH radical (calculated with [OH]?=?10(6) atoms cm(-3)) and around 7-8 h in the reactions with Cl atoms in marine environments (calculated with [Cl]?=?1.3?×?10(5) atoms cm(-3)). The reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals and methylcylohexanes can proceed by H abstraction from the different positions.
PubMed ID
24788931 View in PubMed
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Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and atmospheric pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11273
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 1996 Feb 15;39(4):299-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1996
Author
M. Heilig
J E Månsson
K. Blennow
Author Affiliation
Magnus Huss Clinic, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 1996 Feb 15;39(4):299-301
Date
Feb-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Atmospheric Pressure
Female
Homovanillic Acid - cerebrospinal fluid
Humans
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid - cerebrospinal fluid
Male
Methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol - cerebrospinal fluid
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Suicide - psychology
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Biol Psychiatry. 1996 Oct 1;40(7):682-48886306
PubMed ID
8645778 View in PubMed
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A climatology based on reanalysis of baroclinic developmental regions in the extratropical northern hemisphere.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95466
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1146:235-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
de la Torre Laura
Nieto Raquel
Noguerol Marta
Añel Juan Antonio
Gimeno Luis
Author Affiliation
Facultade de Ciencias de Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, Ourense, Spain. ltr@uvigo.es
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1146:235-55
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmospheric Pressure
Cyclones
Mediterranean Sea
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Regions of the occurrence of different phenomena related to the development of baroclinic disturbances are reviewed for the Northern Hemisphere extratropics, using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data. The occurrence of height lows appears to be related to the orography near the earth's surface and with surface- and upper-air cyclogenesis in the upper troposphere. Over the cyclone tracks, the surface maxima appear to be trapped by land masses, whereas over the Mediterranean Sea they are located on the lee side of mountain ranges. The forcing terms of the geopotential tendency and omega equations mark the genesis (and, by the vorticity advection terms, the path) of the extratropical cyclones on the storm track. They occur mostly over the western coast of the oceans, beginning and having maxima on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. Their associated fronts form from the cold air coming from the continents and converging with the warm air over the Gulf and Kuroshio currents. Evident trends are found only for the Atlantic cyclone track (positive) and the Pacific cyclone track (negative) until the last decade when the tendency reverses. Over the southern Pacific, the number of fronts is lower during 1978-1997, coinciding with a period of strong El Ni?o Southern Oscillation episodes. This information is important for validating numerical models in order to predict changes associated with climate change and to study the behavior of extratropical cyclones and fronts.
PubMed ID
19076418 View in PubMed
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Combined stack effect in houses and eskers explaining transients in radon source.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238247
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1985 Oct;45:195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1985
Author
H. Schmied
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1985 Oct;45:195-201
Date
Oct-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmospheric Pressure
Environmental Exposure
Housing
Humans
Microclimate
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radon - analysis
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
Concentrations of radon indoors and temperatures indoors and outdoors have been recorded every hour with some interruptions for one 12-week period in a dwelling situated on top of an esker outside Stockholm. The concentration of radon in the house shows variations, which can be explained as a combined stack effect in the esker and in the building. The stack effect is not only dependent on temperature differences, but also on the pressure effect that the wind creates. In this study no local wind observations have been made as this was not the main purpose on this occasion. The temperature in the esker is assumed to be at a constant level equivalent to groundwater temperature. From these data the pressure gradient has been calculated and then compared with the radon source.
PubMed ID
4081716 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.