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Acceleration and sprint profiles of a professional elite football team in match play.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267270
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(2):101-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jørgen Ingebrigtsen
Terje Dalen
Geir Håvard Hjelde
Barry Drust
Ulrik Wisløff
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(2):101-10
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acceleration
Athletic Performance
Football
Humans
Movement
Norway
Physical Exertion
Running
Soccer
Walking
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterise the acceleration and sprint profiles of elite football match play in one Norwegian elite football team (Rosenborg FC). Fifteen professional players in five playing positions took part in the study (n = 101 observations). Player movement was recorded during every domestic home game of one full season (n = 15) by an automatic tracking system based on microwave technology. Each player performed 91 ± 21 accelerations per match, with a lower number in the second compared with the first half (47 ± 12 vs. 44 ± 12). Players in lateral positions accelerated more often compared to players in central positions (98.3 ± 20.5 vs. 85.3 ± 19.5, p
PubMed ID
25005777 View in PubMed
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Activity profile of top-class female soccer refereeing in relation to the position of the ball.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153667
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jan;13(1):129-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
J. Mallo
S. Veiga
C. López de Subijana
E. Navarro
Author Affiliation
Sports Biomechanics Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Science, Politechnical University of Madrid, Spain. javier.mallo@upm.es
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jan;13(1):129-32
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Analysis of Variance
Athletic Performance - physiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Running - physiology
Russia
Soccer - physiology
Video Recording
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the activity profile of top-class female soccer referees during competition and to relate it to the position of the ball. Ten matches from the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) under-20 female World Championships held in Russia in 2006 were filmed and the kinematical parameters of the female referees (n=10) and the ball were determined using a two-dimensional photogrammetric video system based on direct linear transformation (DLT) algorithms. Total distance covered during a match was 10 km, of which 1.3 km represented high-intensity activities (>13 km/h). The referees' highest mobility was achieved in the initial 15 min of the match, covering greater distance and performing more intense exercise (P
PubMed ID
19084474 View in PubMed
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ACTN3 R577X and other polymorphisms are not associated with elite endurance athlete status in the Genathlete study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140771
Source
J Sports Sci. 2010 Oct;28(12):1355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Frank E Döring
Simone Onur
Ulf Geisen
Marcel R Boulay
Louis Pérusse
Tuomo Rankinen
Rainer Rauramaa
Bernd Wolfahrt
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany. vgoyrgoy@phyed.duth.gr
Source
J Sports Sci. 2010 Oct;28(12):1355-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinin - genetics
Athletes
Athletic Performance
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Germany
Homozygote
Humans
Male
North America
Odds Ratio
Physical Endurance - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract
Homozygosity for a premature stop codon at amino acid position 577 in the alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene leads to a-actinin-3 deficiency. This genotype is observed in approximately 18% of Caucasians. The ACTN3 R577X polymorphism has been previously associated with indicators of physical performance in several, but not all, studies. We examined the prevalence of R577X (rs1815739) and two additional haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) of the ACTN3 gene (rs1791690 and rs2275998) in the Genathlete study comprising 316 male elite endurance athletes (VO2max 79.0+3.5 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1); mean +/- s) from North America, Finland, and Germany and 304 sedentary controls (VO2max 40.1+7.0 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) matched by country of origin. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies between the two groups was tested by Pearson chi-square and/or Fischer exact test. The prevalence of the 577X homozygote genotype was similar in endurance athletes and controls (20% and 17.5%, respectively). The resulting odds ratio for endurance performance in 577X homozygotes compared with 577R-allele carriers was 1.24 (95%CI 0.82-1.87, P = 0.3). The genotype distribution of the two htSNPs and haplotype frequencies did not differ significantly between athletes and controls. In conclusion, our findings indicate that ACTN3 R577X and other SNPs in ACTN3 are not genetic determinants of endurance performance in Caucasian males.
PubMed ID
20845221 View in PubMed
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[Actual nutrition and physical state of athletes of the national sleigh team of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134489
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2011;80(1):78-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
K V Vybornaia
G A Azizbekian
E A Rozhkova
M A Abramova
D B Nikitiuk
A L Pozdniakov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2011;80(1):78-80
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Athletes
Athletic Performance - physiology
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Abstract
An assessment of actual nutrition and physical fitness of athletes of the Russian national sleigh team are presented, and the need to develop for them the individual well-balanced diet that will reimburse the amount of consumed energy and nutrients and help athletes to obtain high results.
PubMed ID
21574473 View in PubMed
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Aerodynamic drag is not the major determinant of performance during giant slalom skiing at the elite level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119255
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Feb;23(1):e38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
M. Supej
L. Saetran
L. Oggiano
G. Ettema
N. Ĺ arabon
B. Nemec
H-C Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Sport, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Feb;23(1):e38-47
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Performance - physiology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Friction
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Skiing - physiology
Snow
Sweden
Time Factors
Wind
Young Adult
Abstract
This investigation was designed to (a) develop an individualized mechanical model for measuring aerodynamic drag (F(d) ) while ski racing through multiple gates, (b) estimate energy dissipation (E(d) ) caused by F(d) and compare this to the total energy loss (E(t) ), and (c) investigate the relative contribution of E(d) /E(t) to performance during giant slalom skiing (GS). Nine elite skiers were monitored in different positions and with different wind velocities in a wind tunnel, as well as during GS and straight downhill skiing employing a Global Navigation Satellite System. On the basis of the wind tunnel measurements, a linear regression model of drag coefficient multiplied by cross-sectional area as a function of shoulder height was established for each skier (r > 0.94, all P
PubMed ID
23121340 View in PubMed
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Association of the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism with power athlete status in Russians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157238
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2008 Aug;103(6):631-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Anastasiya M Druzhevskaya
Ildus I Ahmetov
Irina V Astratenkova
Viktor A Rogozkin
Author Affiliation
Sports Genetics Laboratory, St Petersburg Research Institute of Physical Culture, 2 Dynamo Avenue, St Petersburg, Russia. a.druzhevskaya@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2008 Aug;103(6):631-4
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinin - genetics
Adult
Athletic Performance
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene Frequency
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Muscle Contraction - genetics
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Russia
Abstract
The alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene encodes a Z-disc structural protein which is found only in fast glycolytic muscle fibers. A common nonsense polymorphism in codon 577 of the ACTN3 gene (R577X) results in alpha-actinin-3 deficiency in XX homozygotes. Previous reports have shown a lower proportion of the ACTN3 XX genotype in power-oriented athletes compared to the general population. In the present study we tested whether XX genotype was under-represented in Russian power-oriented athletes. The study involved 486 Russian power-oriented athletes of regional or national competitive standard. ACTN3 genotype and allele frequencies were compared to 1,197 controls. The frequencies of the ACTN3 XX genotype (6.4 vs. 14.2%; P
PubMed ID
18470530 View in PubMed
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Athlete burnout in elite sport: a self-determination perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151021
Source
J Sports Sci. 2009 Jun;27(8):785-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Chris Lonsdale
Ken Hodge
Elaine Rose
Author Affiliation
Irish Rugby Football Union and School of Physiotherapy and Performance Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. chris.lonsdale@ucd.ie
Source
J Sports Sci. 2009 Jun;27(8):785-95
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Performance - psychology
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Personal Autonomy
Personal Satisfaction
Professional Autonomy
Psychological Theory
Self Concept
Sports - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Young Adult
Abstract
Using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) as the theoretical framework, we examined potential antecedents of athlete burnout in 201 elite Canadian athletes (121 females, 80 males; mean age 22.9 years). Employing a cross-sectional design, our primary aims were to investigate the relationships between behavioural regulations and athlete burnout and to examine whether self-determined motivation mediated relationships between basic needs satisfaction and athlete burnout. Our self-determination theory-derived hypotheses were largely supported. Relationships among athlete burnout and behavioural regulations mostly varied according to their rank on the self-determination continuum, with less self-determined motives showing positive associations and more self-determined motives showing negative correlations with burnout. The basic needs of competence and autonomy, plus self-determined motivation, accounted for significant amounts of variance in athlete burnout symptoms (exhaustion, R(2) = 0.31; devaluation, R(2) = 0.49; reduced accomplishment, R(2) = 0.61; global burnout, R(2) = 0.74). Self-determined motivation fully mediated the relationships that competence and autonomy had with exhaustion. Analyses showed indirect relationships between these two needs and devaluation, through their associations with self-determined motivation. Motivation partially mediated the needs-reduced sense of accomplishment relationships, but the direct effects were more prominent than the indirect effects.
PubMed ID
19437185 View in PubMed
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Balancing performance-based expectations with a holistic perspective on coaching: a qualitative study of Swedish women's national football team coaches' practice experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291869
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2017 Dec; 12(1):1358580
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Eva-Carin Lindgren
Natalie Barker-Ruchti
Author Affiliation
a School of Health and Welfare , Halmstad University , Halmstad , Sweden.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2017 Dec; 12(1):1358580
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Athletes
Athletic Performance
Attitude
Competitive Behavior
Empathy
Female
Football
Humans
Mentoring
Qualitative Research
Soccer
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how an exclusive sample of women's national football team coaches described how they implement careful coaching while facing social and organizational pressure to win medals.
To consider coaches' negotiations, we drew on Noddings' concept of caring. Using an interpretive research paradigm, we conducted in-depth interviews with five Swedish women's national football team coaches. An abductive approach was used to simultaneously process the theoretical framework of "ethics of care" and the empirical data.
The coaches unanimously adopted a holistic perspective to coaching. The coaching strategies they described included promoting players' development, well-being, and sustainable elite performance; listening to the players' voices and engaging in dialogue; and creating a positive environment and promoting fair play.
These findings demonstrate that the women coaches, despite performance pressure, adopt caring coaching in the form of Noddings' pedagogical modelling, dialogue, and confirmation strategies, and provide an example of how coaches can adopt caring, holistic, and athlete-centred coaching while working at the highest level of competitive sport and achieving competitive success.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28812449 View in PubMed
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Between medical treatment and performance enhancement: an investigation of how elite athletes experience Therapeutic Use Exemptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114775
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Nov;24(6):579-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Marie Overbye
Ulrik Wagner
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: moverbye@ifi.ku.dk.
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Nov;24(6):579-88
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletes - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Athletic Performance - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Denmark
Doping in Sports - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internet
Male
Perception
Performance-Enhancing Substances - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
Athletes can be allowed to use substances from the prohibited list (the doping list) if they have a medical condition. If so, a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) is required. The boundaries between the use of pharmacological substances due to a medical need and doping are sometimes blurred. Although manipulating the system of TUE granting potentially represents an entry stage for doping, few studies examine how athletes perceive TUE management and relate this to current anti-doping policy.
645 Danish elite athletes (mean age 22.12, SD=5.82) representing 40 sports completed a web-based questionnaire about their experience and perception of TUE (response rate: 43%).
19% of the respondents had been granted a TUE. 85% of athletes granted a TUE regarded their use of the TUE system as necessary to compete on equal terms with other athletes. Administrative hurdles for TUE prevented 7% of athletes from applying. 53% of the athletes considered that being "allowed" to dope by means of a TUE was of importance for their (hypothetical) wish to try out doping. 51% believed that athletes in their sport received TUEs without a medical need. Athletes granted TUEs had more than twice as high odds to distrust the efficacy of the system than athletes never granted a TUE. The belief that TUEs were misused was especially common among endurance athletes, regardless of them having experience with TUEs or not. 4% believed it would be okay to receive a TUE without a medical need.
The results confirm that TUE is a problem in anti-doping policy. The fact that distrust in TUE administration increases once an athlete has experience of TUEs represents a challenge for anti-doping policy. We suggest more critical research on TUEs be carried out in order to improve harmonization and increase transparency in the regulations.
PubMed ID
23582632 View in PubMed
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BMI, a performance parameter for speed improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257373
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e90183
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Adrien Sedeaud
Andy Marc
Adrien Marck
Frédéric Dor
Julien Schipman
Maya Dorsey
Amal Haida
Geoffroy Berthelot
Jean-François Toussaint
Author Affiliation
IRMES (Institut de Recherche bioMédicale et d'Epidémiologie du Sport), INSEP, Paris, France ; Université Paris-Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e90183
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Performance
Body mass index
Humans
Male
Running
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between anthropometric characteristics and performance in all track and field running events and assess Body Mass Index (BMI) as a relevant performance indicator. Data of mass, height, BMI and speed were collected for the top 100 international men athletes in track events from 100 m to marathon for the 1996-2011 seasons, and analyzed by decile of performance. Speed is significantly associated with mass (r = 0.71) and BMI (r = 0.71) in world-class runners and moderately with height (r = 0.39). Athletes, on average were continuously lighter and smaller with distance increments. In track and field, speed continuously increases with BMI. In each event, performances are organized through physique gradients. « Lighter and smaller is better » in endurance events but « heavier and taller is better » for sprints. When performance increases, BMI variability progressively tightens, but it is always centered around a distance-specific optimum. Running speed is organized through biometric gradients, which both drives and are driven by performance optimization. The highest performance level is associated with narrower biometric intervals. Through BMI indicators, diversity is possible for sprints whereas for long distance events, there is a more restrictive aspect in terms of physique. BMI is a relevant indicator, which allows for a clear differentiation of athletes' capacities between each discipline and level of performance in the fields of human possibilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24587266 View in PubMed
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84 records – page 1 of 9.