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77 records – page 1 of 8.

ACL injury incidence in female handball 10 years after the Norwegian ACL prevention study: important lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116381
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 May;47(8):476-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Grethe Myklebust
Arnhild Skjølberg
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Department of Sports Medicine, Oslo, Norway. grethe.myklebust@nih.no
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 May;47(8):476-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Track and Field - injuries
PubMed ID
23403528 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agreement statement from the 1st international rodeo research and clinical care conference: calgary, alberta, Canada (july 7-9, 2004).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174996
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2005 May;15(3):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):561
Publication Type
Article
Author
B D Jordan
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):561
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Boxing - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Denmark
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-1002301696
PubMed ID
2252100 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An early test for all elite athletes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217333
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Sep 7;91(36):3137
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-1994
Author
B. Wicklin
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Sep 7;91(36):3137
Date
Sep-7-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Humans
Physical Examination
Physical Fitness
Sweden
PubMed ID
7990550 View in PubMed
Less detail

An observational study of protective equipment use among in-line skaters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204168
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Sep;4(3):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
L. Warda
S. Harlos
T P Klassen
M E Moffatt
N. Buchan
V L Koop
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. lwarda@escape.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Sep;4(3):198-202
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Protective Devices - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sex Distribution
Skating - injuries
Abstract
To describe the patterns of protective equipment use by in-line skaters in Winnipeg, Manitoba and nearby rural communities.
In-line skaters were observed for three months in 1996 at 190 urban and 30 rural sites selected using a formal sampling scheme. Age, gender, protective equipment use, skating companions, correct helmet use, and use of headphones were recorded.
Altogether 123 in-line skaters were observed at 61 sites, including one rural site. No skaters were observed at the remaining sites. There were 37 adults and 86 children; 56% were male. Helmet use was 12.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4% to 18.0%), wrist guard use was 16.3% (95% CI = 9.7% to 22.8%), knee pad use was 9.8% (95% CI = 5.2% to 16.4%), and elbow pad use was 7.3% (95% CI = 3.4% to 13.4%). Children were more likely to wear a helmet than teens 12-19 years of age (relative risk (RR) = 30, 95% CI = 4.01 to 225). Adults were more likely to wear wrist guards than children (RR = 4.32, 95% CI = 1.87 to 9.94). No gender differences were found. Incorrect helmet use was documented in four skaters; three skaters were wearing headphones.
Low rates of protective equipment use were documented in our region, significantly lower than those reported in the literature. Barriers to equipment use are not known, and should be examined by further study. In-line skating safety programs should be developed, promoted, and evaluated. Teens should be targeted for future preventive efforts.
Notes
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1996 Feb;27(2):204-98629753
Cites: Pediatr Emerg Care. 1996 Aug;12(4):259-628858648
Cites: J Pediatr Orthop. 1996 Sep-Oct;16(5):640-38865051
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 1996 Apr;3(4):304-118881538
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Nov 28;335(22):1630-58929359
Cites: Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):249-559346041
Cites: Inj Prev. 1996 Jun;2(2):126-309346076
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1989 Jun;143(6):741-42729220
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1990 Jan;144(1):83-62294724
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1992 May-Jun;107(3):283-91594738
Cites: Pediatrics. 1992 Sep;90(3):354-81518688
Cites: J Orthop Trauma. 1992;6(3):301-51403248
Cites: J Trauma. 1993 Dec;35(6):946-518263997
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 Apr;84(4):6758154579
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1994 May;38(5):486-88176347
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 1995 Jan;4(1):19-237812471
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1994 Dec;71(6):536-97726617
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;86(2):133-67757893
Cites: Sports Med. 1995 Jun;19(6):427-327676103
PubMed ID
9788090 View in PubMed
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[A protective collar is mandatory for all ice hockey players].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210396
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 4;93(49):4526
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-4-1996
Author
R. Lorentzon
L. Hovelius
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 4;93(49):4526
Date
Dec-4-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Male
Neck
Protective Devices
Sweden
PubMed ID
8999234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are we having fun yet? Fostering adherence to injury preventive exercise recommendations in young athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128093
Source
Sports Med. 2012 Mar 1;42(3):175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2012
Author
Melanie R Keats
Carolyn A Emery
Caroline F Finch
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. melanie.keats@dal.ca
Source
Sports Med. 2012 Mar 1;42(3):175-84
Date
Mar-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Canada
Female
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Muscle Stretching Exercises - methods
Primary prevention - methods
Risk-Taking
Young Adult
Abstract
Sport and recreational activities are the leading cause of injury in youth, yet there is increasing evidence that many sport-related injuries are preventable. For injury prevention strategies to be effective, individuals must understand, adopt and adhere to the recommended prevention strategy or programme. Despite the recognized importance of a behavioural approach, the inclusion of behavioural change strategies in sport injury prevention has been historically neglected. The purpose of this commentary is to outline the rationale for the inclusion and application of behavioural science in reducing the burden of injury by increasing adherence to proven prevention strategies. In an effort to provide an illustrative example of a behavioural change approach, the authors suggest a specific plan for the implementation of a neuromuscular training strategy to reduce the risk of lower limb injury in youth sport. Given the paucity of evidence in the sport injury prevention setting, and the lack of application of theoretical frameworks to predicting adoption and adherence to injury preventive exercise recommendations in youth sport, data from the related physical activity promotion domain is utilized to describe how sound, theory-based injury prevention exercise interventions in youth may be developed. While the question of how to facilitate behavioural change and optimize adherence to preventive exercise recommendations remains an ongoing challenge, the authors detail several strategies based on two prominent behavioural theories to aid the reader in conceptualizing, designing and implementing effective interventions. Despite the minimal application of behavioural theory within the field of sport injury prevention in youth, behavioural science has the potential to make a significant impact on the understanding and prevention of youth sport injury. Appropriate evaluation of adherence and maintenance components based on models of behavioural change should be a critical component of future injury prevention research and practice.
Notes
Comment In: Sports Med. 2012 Sep 1;42(9):725-3222909184
PubMed ID
22235907 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part 2. Results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267116
Source
Dent Traumatol. 2013 Dec;29(6):432-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Ulf Glendor
Source
Dent Traumatol. 2013 Dec;29(6):432-44
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Male
Mouth - injuries
Mouth Protectors - utilization
Sweden
Abstract
The yearly cost of sports injuries, which affects Swedish society, is estimated to 3 billion SEK (460 million USD). Injuries in ice hockey represent at least 270 million SEK (42 million USD). Despite the high number of injuries, mouth and face guards are rarely used in Swedish ice hockey. The major aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of mouth and face guards in two ice hockey clubs in Sweden (one elite and one division 3 club). A second purpose was to determine why some players use mouth and face guards, while others do not. A third goal was to present a material that ice hockey clubs could use for further discussions.
A phenomenographic analysis of focus groups interviews.
The phenomenographic analysis of the data resulted in 12 categories. Within each category, issues, activities and engagement of the participants were described. Further, similarities and differences in the discussions between the elite club and the division 3 club were described. The following categories were found to engage the participants the most: 'Ice hockey is a high-velocity collision sport in which injuries are expected', 'Attitudes towards personal protection guards' and 'Suggested measures'.
The participants were aware of the risk of playing ice hockey, but they know little about the consequences of a dental injury. Although ice hockey players wish to protect themselves, they refuse to accept just any mouth or face guard. Through the discussions about reducing dental and jaw injuries by routine use of protection devices, many reform proposals were presented that could be useful in future discussions.
PubMed ID
23311956 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part I. Materials and method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266804
Source
Dent Traumatol. 2013 Oct;29(5):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Ulf Glendor
Anne Göransson
Source
Dent Traumatol. 2013 Oct;29(5):355-9
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Focus Groups
Head Protective Devices
Hockey
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
The most common method to study the use and attitudes of mouth and face guards is a limited number of preprepared questions. This approach, however, risks information restriction and lowers the general value of the study. The aim of this study was therefore to present a phenomenographic approach to capture the use and attitudes towards mouth and face guards in two Swedish ice hockey clubs.
The phenomenographic study was set up as 12 focus group interviews: six interviews with one elite and six interviews with one division 3 ice hockey club in Sweden. A number of categories were identified, which became the basis for how the results are presented.
The participants inspired each other to speak freely, which allowed for much wider and deeper discussions than was expected. In comparison with the use of a preprepared questionnaire with a limited number of questions sent home by post, this method included comments from the participants and revealed new angles of approach in 12 identified categories.
Using a phenomenographic research method, more variations and different apprehensions could be revealed than what would be possible with a set of preprepared questions sent by post or used in individual interviews.
PubMed ID
23374909 View in PubMed
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Bicycle accidents and drivers' visual search at left and right turns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212524
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 Mar;28(2):147-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
H. Summala
E. Pasanen
M. Räsänen
J. Sievänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 Mar;28(2):147-53
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - psychology
Adult
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control - psychology
Attention
Automobile Driving - psychology
Bicycling - injuries
Eye Movements
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Orientation
Perceptual Masking
Reaction Time
Risk factors
Visual perception
Abstract
The accident data base of the City of Helsinki shows that when drivers cross a cycle path as they enter a non-signalized intersection, the clearly dominant type of car-cycle crashes is that in which a cyclist comes from the right and the driver is turning right, in marked contrast to the cases with drivers turning left (Pasanen 1992; City of Helsinki, Traffic Planning Department, Report L4). This study first tested an explanation that drivers turning right simply focus their attention on the cars coming from the left-those coming from the right posing no threat to them-and fail to see the cyclist from the right early enough. Drivers' scanning behavior was studied at two T-intersections. Two well-hidden video cameras were used, one to measure the head movements of the approaching drivers and the other one to measure speed and distance from the cycle crossroad. The results supported the hypothesis: the drivers turning right scanned the right leg of the T-intersection less frequently and later than those turning left. Thus, it appears that drivers develop a visual scanning strategy which concentrates on detection of more frequent and major dangers but ignores and may even mask visual information on less frequent dangers. The second part of the study evaluated different countermeasures, including speed humps, in terms of drivers' visual search behavior. The results suggested that speed-reducing countermeasures changed drivers' visual search patterns in favor of the cyclists coming from the right, presumably at least in part due to the fact that drivers were simply provided with more time to focus on each direction.
PubMed ID
8703272 View in PubMed
Less detail

77 records – page 1 of 8.