Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
Cites: Chem Biol. 2014 Mar 20;21(3):319-29 PMID 24529992
Cites: Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 2015 Jul;123(7):386-93 PMID 26171622
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2014 Feb;80(2):169-81 PMID 24256495
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 1986 Jun 15;157(2):175-81 PMID 3013467
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 1987 Dec;73(6):659-64 PMID 3690980
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):582S-586S PMID 18689406
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):165-70 PMID 24197920
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Oct 12;11(10 ):e0164395 PMID 27732653
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):1080S-6S PMID 18400738
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2001 Nov;16(11):2066-73 PMID 11697803
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Dec 15;309(12):E1019-31 PMID 26506852
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Jan;20(1):133-40 PMID 18458986
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1988 Aug;67(2):373-8 PMID 2839537
Cites: Diabetes. 2010 Jan;59(1):242-8 PMID 19833894
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1425-31 PMID 15744449
Cites: Curr Sports Med Rep. 2010 Jul-Aug;9(4):220-6 PMID 20622540
Cites: Sports Health. 2014 Jul;6(4):340-7 PMID 24982708
Cites: J Fam Health. 2015 May-Jun;25(3):16-9 PMID 26118289
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 13;74:27963 PMID 25976742
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Aug;37(4):798-802 PMID 22554144
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2013 Oct;63(7):485-93 PMID 24027218
Cites: Mo Med. 2014 Jan-Feb;111(1):49-53 PMID 24645299
Cites: Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2014 Jun;25(4):338-43 PMID 24628618
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2009 Sep;49(3):278-84 PMID 19884877
Cites: Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2014 Nov;17(6):539-45 PMID 25137505
Cites: Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18 PMID 18076342
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2015 Dec 14;114(11):1838-44 PMID 26420417
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Apr;22(4):535-42 PMID 24398372
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jul 28;:1-8 PMID 27465921
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 May 28;5(6):1856-68 PMID 23760056
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Feb;94(2):559-63 PMID 19033372
Cites: Sports Med. 2015 Feb;45(2):213-29 PMID 25252613
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Feb;90(2):635-40 PMID 15546897
Cites: Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2012 Jan-Mar;6(1):28-31 PMID 23014251
Cites: Sports Health. 2012 Nov;4(6):496-501 PMID 24179588
Cites: Asian J Sports Med. 2011 Dec;2(4):211-9 PMID 22375241
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013 May;56(5):551-5 PMID 23274340
Cites: J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2015 Aug 19;12:33 PMID 26288575
Cites: Exerc Immunol Rev. 2013;19:86-101 PMID 23977722
Cites: J Endocrinol Invest. 2014 Jul;37(7):609-17 PMID 24696159
Cites: World J Diabetes. 2015 Jul 10;6(7):896-911 PMID 26185598
PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent elite athletes' cigarette smoking, use of snus, and alcohol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258381
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Apr;24(2):439-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
M. Martinsen
J. Sundgot-Borgen
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center, The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Apr;24(2):439-46
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Performance-Enhancing Substances
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sports
Students - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco, Smokeless - utilization
Abstract
The purpose was to examine cigarette smoking, use of snus, alcohol, and performance-enhancing illicit drugs among adolescent elite athletes and controls, and possible gender and sport group differences. First-year students at 16 Norwegian Elite Sport High Schools (n = 677) and two randomly selected high schools (controls, n = 421) were invited to participate. Totally, 602 athletes (89%) and 354 (84%) controls completed the questionnaire. More controls than athletes were smoking, using snus, and drinking alcohol. Competing in team sports was associated with use of snus [odds ratio = 2.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6 to 4.7] and a similar percentage of male and female handball (22.2% vs 18.8%) and soccer players (15.7% vs 15.0%) reported using snus. For controls, not participating in organized sport was a predictor for smoking (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.2 to 10.9). Female athletes were more prone to drink alcohol than males (46.3% vs 31.0%, P
PubMed ID
22830488 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma and Asthma Medication Are Common among Recreational Athletes Participating in Endurance Sport Competitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299337
Source
Can Respir J. 2018; 2018:3238546
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Amanda Näsman
Tommie Irewall
Ulf Hållmarker
Anne Lindberg
Nikolai Stenfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Medicine-Östersund, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Can Respir J. 2018; 2018:3238546
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Endurance Training
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiratory System Agents - therapeutic use
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Asthma prevalence is high among elite endurance athletes, but little is known about its prevalence among competitive recreational athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported asthma and asthma medication use among competitive recreational endurance athletes and their association with training.
A web survey on asthma and medication was conducted among 38,603 adult participants of three Swedish endurance competitions (cross-country running, cross-country skiing, and swimming).
The overall response rate was 29%. The prevalence of self-reported asthma (physician-diagnosed asthma and use of asthma medication in the last 12 months) was 12%. Among those reporting asthma, 23% used inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta-agonists daily. We found no association between training volume and daily use of asthma medication, except a trend in relation to short-acting beta-agonists. Independent predictors of self-reported asthma were female sex, allergic rhinitis, previous eczema, family history of asthma, cycling, and training for >5?h 50?min/week.
The prevalence of self-reported asthma among Swedish competitive recreational endurance athletes appears to be higher than that in the general Swedish population. A large proportion of recreational athletes were reported with asthma use medications, indicating an association between high physical activity and self-reported asthma among competitive recreational athletes.
PubMed ID
30034562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risk in Norwegian world class athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142895
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Trude Eid Robsahm
Unn Elisabet Hestvik
Marit Bragelien Veierød
Arne Fagerlie
Wenche Nystad
Lars Engebretsen
Steinar Tretli
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. trude.eid.robsahm@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1711-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
Physical activity appears to be inversely related to cancer risk, although the evidence is convincing for colon cancer only. As physical activity levels are difficult to measure in the general population, we aimed to investigate how physical activity influences cancer risk using a cohort of Norwegian world class athletes.
The cohort includes 3,428 athletes. Individual questionnaires gave information about physical activity and lifestyle variables until attained age. To elucidate the level of cancer risk, groups of athletes were compared to the general population (external comparisons) and to each other (internal comparisons).
A slightly reduced risk of total cancer was observed in the cohort of athletes, but stronger effects were observed for subgroups. The risk reduction was most pronounced for lung cancer and for leukemia/lymphoma. In women, a threefold increased risk of thyroid cancer was observed.
This cohort of athletes seems to have a reduced risk of cancer. The beneficial association, however, is weak and may be attributed to healthy lifestyle as well as to physical activity. Prolonged strenuous exercise may also increase the risk of thyroid cancer in women.
PubMed ID
20544266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Costs of diabetes medication among male former elite athletes in later life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282254
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2017 Apr;54(4):335-341
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M K Laine
R. Kujala
J G Eriksson
H. Kautiainen
S. Sarna
U M Kujala
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2017 Apr;54(4):335-341
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Exercise
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Insulin
Male
Sports
Abstract
Regular physical activity plays a major role, in both prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Less is known whether vigorous physical activity during young adulthood is associated with costs of diabetes medication in later life. The aim of this study is to evaluate this question.
The study population consisted of 1314 former elite-class athletes and 860 matched controls. The former athletes were divided into three groups based on their active career sport: endurance, mixed and power sports. Information on purchases of diabetes medication between 1995 and 2009 was obtained from the drug purchase register of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution.
The total cost of diabetes medication per person year was significantly lower among the former endurance (mean 81 € [95% CI 33-151 €]) and mixed group athletes (mean 272 € [95% CI 181-388 €]) compared with the controls (mean 376 € [95% CI 284-485 €]), (p 
PubMed ID
27933516 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of nutritional intake in Canadian high-performance athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148635
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2009 Sep;19(5):405-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Victor Lun
Kelly Anne Erdman
Raylene A Reimer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. vmylun@ucalgary.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2009 Sep;19(5):405-11
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Child
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the nutritional intake of Canadian high-performance athletes.
Prospective survey study.
Canadian sport center athletes.
Three hundred twenty-four high-performance athletes (114 males and 201 females; mean age 21.3 +/- 13 years) from 8 Canadian sport centers participated in the study.
Subjects prospectively completed 3-day dietary records, reporting all food, fluid, and supplement consumption.
Dietary records were analyzed for total calories, macronutrients, and micronutrients for food alone and food plus supplements for all subjects collectively and according to gender and competitive event.
Average daily energy intake was 2533 +/- 843 Kcal/day with males consuming more calories than females (2918 +/- 927 and 2304 +/- 713 Kcal/day, respectively; P
Notes
Erratum In: Clin J Sport Med. 2010 Jan;20(1):71Dosage error in article text
PubMed ID
19741314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors affecting the relative age effect in NHL athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104257
Source
Can J Surg. 2014 Jun;57(3):157-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Caroline I Parent-Harvey
Christophe Desjardins
Edward J Harvey
Author Affiliation
Montréal, Que.
Source
Can J Surg. 2014 Jun;57(3):157-61
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Hockey
Humans
Male
Abstract
The relative age effect (RAE) has been reported for a number of different activities. The RAE is the phenomena whereby players born in the first few months of a competition year are advantaged for selection to elite sports. Much of the literature has identified elite male athletics, such as the National Hockey League (NHL), as having consistently large RAEs. We propose that RAE may be lessened in the NHL since the last examination.
We examined demographic and selection factors to understand current NHL selection biases.
We found that RAE was weak and was only evident when birth dates were broken into year halves. Players born in the first half of the year were relatively advantaged for entry into the NHL. We found that the RAE is smaller than reported in previous studies. Intraplayer comparisons for multiple factors, including place of birth, country of play, type of hockey played, height and weight, revealed no differences. Players who were not drafted (e.g., free agents) or who played university hockey in North America had no apparent RAE.
We found little evidence of an RAE in the current NHL player rosters. A larger study of all Canadian minor hockey intercity teams could help determine the existence of an RAE.
Notes
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2007 Jun;25(8):879-8617474041
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Jul;120(1):142-817606571
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2007 Aug;41(8):515-717331975
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Jun;104(3 Pt 1):702-617688123
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2008 Nov;26(13):1403-918825541
Cites: Sports Med. 2009;39(3):235-5619290678
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2009 Jun;80(2):336-4419650399
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2006 Apr;24(4):405-1316492604
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2008 Dec;26(14):1531-819040189
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2006 Oct;24(10):1065-7317115521
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2006 Apr;102(2):302-816826648
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2010 May;28(7):717-2220480428
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Oct;19(5):720-3018627551
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2010 Apr;28(6):627-3120397099
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2011 Sep;29(12):1337-4421800970
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e6033623637745
PubMed ID
24869606 View in PubMed
Less detail

Former athletes' health-related lifestyle behaviours and self-rated health in late adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141867
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2010 Oct;31(10):751-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
H. Bäckmand
U. Kujala
S. Sarna
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. heli.backmand@thl.fi
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2010 Oct;31(10):751-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Exercise
Finland
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Registries
Smoking - epidemiology
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the associations between self-rated health (SRH), physical activity and other lifestyle habits among former athletes and referents in late adulthood. Male athletes (N=514) who represented Finland from 1920 through 1965 and referents (N=368) who were classified healthy at the age of 20 years participated in this population-based cohort study. The present analysis was based on a questionnaire study in 2001. SRH was assessed by a single question. Univariate binary and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations of health-related behaviours with SRH. The majority of former athletes (64%) rated their health better than referents (48%). A higher percentage of the athletes (54%) compared to the referents (44%) belonged to the most physically active groups (MET quintiles IV-V). A high percentage of the athletes (77%) and referents (79%) were occasional or moderate alcohol users. The proportion of never smokers among athletes was 59% and among referents 37%. Among current smokers there were no differences in nicotine dependence between athletes and referents (p=0.07). In the univariate analysis the odds of reporting good SRH was 2 times higher for athletes (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.53-2.64, p
PubMed ID
20665385 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injuries and Associated Risk Factors Among Adolescent Elite Orienteerers: A 26-Week Prospective Registration Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279767
Source
J Athl Train. 2016 Apr;51(4):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Philip von Rosen
Annette I-L M Heijne
Anna Frohm
Source
J Athl Train. 2016 Apr;51(4):321-8
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Musculoskeletal System - injuries
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Running - injuries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In orienteering, the number of injury-registration studies is limited. Most researchers have used a cross-sectional design during specific events and, therefore, have mainly identified acute injuries.
To determine the prevalence of injuries by registering acute and overuse injuries in adolescent elite orienteerers over 26 weeks and to study the variation of injury prevalence over the season and the potential risk factors.
Cohort study.
Two high schools in Sweden with national orienteering teams.
All athletes (33 adolescent girls, 31 adolescent boys; age = 17 ± 1 years) from 2 high schools with orienteering teams.
We used a weekly Web-based questionnaire to identify the incidence and prevalence of injuries and training variables. Risk factors for injury were calculated using multiple linear regression techniques.
The average weekly prevalence of overuse and acute injuries was 35.7% (95% confidence interval = 34.8%, 36.6%) and 1.7% (95% confidence interval = 1.3%, 2.1%), respectively; overuse injuries (78.0%, n = 85) accounted for the majority. The incidence of acute and overuse injuries was highest for the foot/lower leg (48.6%, n = 53), and 71.6% (n = 78) of all injuries affected the foot/lower leg and knee area. Time to the first reported injury was associated with training volume (ß = 0.184, P = .001), competition time (ß = -0.701, P = .009), running on asphalt roads (ß = -0.348, P = .008), and running on forest surfaces and trails (ß = -0.331, P = .007), with a model fit of r(?2) = 0.50 (intercept = 2.196, P
PubMed ID
27065190 View in PubMed
Less detail

No difference in prevalence of spine and hip pain in young Elite skiers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295499
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2018 Jul; 26(7):1959-1965
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Carl Todd
Anna Swärd Aminoff
Cecilia Agnvall
Olof Thoreson
Leif Swärd
Jon Karlsson
Adad Baranto
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göthenburg, Sweden. carl.todd@me.com.
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2018 Jul; 26(7):1959-1965
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Back Injuries - epidemiology
Back Pain - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Pain
Prevalence
Skiing - injuries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence between back and hip pain in young Elite skiers.
Sample group (n = 102), consisted of young Elite skiers (n = 75) and age-matched non-athletes (n = 27), all completed a three-part back and hip pain questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and EuroQoL to evaluate general health, activity level, back and hip pain prevalence.
No significant differences were shown for lifetime prevalence of back pain in the skiers (50%) compared with controls (44%) (n.s.). Duration of back pain for the skiers showed (30%) > 1 year, whilst (46%) > 5 years. A significant difference was shown with increased Visual Analogue Scale back pain levels for skiers 5.3 (SD 3.1) compared with controls 2.4 (SD 1.9, p = 0.025). No significant differences were shown for lifetime prevalence of hip pain in skiers (21%) compared with controls (8%) (n.s.).
Young Elite skiers are shown not to have increased lifetime prevalence for back and hip pain compared with a non-athletic control group.
II.
Notes
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Nov;63 Suppl 11:S240-52 PMID 22588748
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1996 Feb;28(2):165-70 PMID 8775149
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2001 Dec;8(12):1153-7 PMID 11733293
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1990 Feb;15(2):124-9 PMID 2139242
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1986 Sep-Oct;14(5):404-6 PMID 3777317
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Sep;27(9):983-989 PMID 27367529
Cites: Res Sports Med. 2009;17(4):231-44 PMID 19967602
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Nov 15;25(22):2940-52; discussion 2952 PMID 11074683
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2013 Jun;41(6):1357-62 PMID 23562808
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2004 Jan;12(1):80-5 PMID 14530845
Cites: J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Oct;25(10):2879-90 PMID 21873901
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2011 Sep;19(9):1540-6 PMID 21559845
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Nov;469(11):3229-40 PMID 21761254
Cites: Sports Med. 2005;35(11):991-1014 PMID 16271011
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2015 Aug;43(8):2042-8 PMID 26109612
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Mar 7;316(7133):736-41 PMID 9529408
Cites: J Exp Orthop. 2015 Dec;2(1):6 PMID 26914874
Cites: Pain Physician. 2015 May-Jun;18(3):E333-46 PMID 26000680
Cites: J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2013 Nov;21(11):665-74 PMID 24187036
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2014 Feb;472(2):430-6 PMID 23604603
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2018 Jan;26(1):325-332 PMID 28409199
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2006 Sep;14(9):907-14 PMID 16416326
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2016 Oct;50(19):1169-76 PMID 27629403
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1991 Apr;16(4):437-43 PMID 1828629
Cites: Clin Sports Med. 2012 Jul;31(3):453-72 PMID 22657995
Cites: J Orthop Surg Res. 2016 Nov 22;11(1):148 PMID 27876068
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2013 Oct;41(10):2308-13 PMID 23911701
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2009 Sep;17(9):1125-34 PMID 19305975
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2007 Nov;35(11):1955-9 PMID 17609527
Cites: J Pediatr Orthop. 2008 Dec;28(8):806-11 PMID 19034169
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Apr;42(4):A1-57 PMID 22466247
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1956 Oct;38-A(5):1056-76 PMID 13367082
Cites: Phys Ther Sport. 2006 Nov;7(4):181-4 PMID 21663829
Cites: Psychol Med. 1988 Nov;18(4):1007-19 PMID 3078045
Cites: J Sport Rehabil. 2009 Feb;18(1):60-75 PMID 19321907
Cites: J Orthop Surg Res. 2015 Oct 17;10:162 PMID 26475136
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2004 Mar;32(2):494-7 PMID 14977679
Cites: Clin Nucl Med. 1997 Mar;22(3):161-5 PMID 9067669
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Jun;24(3):e180-7 PMID 24118532
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2005 Feb;35(2):106-10 PMID 15773568
PubMed ID
29204863 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.