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The gene for severe combined immunodeficiency disease in Athabascan-speaking Native Americans is located on chromosome 10p

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100788
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 1998 Jan;62(1):136-144
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
  1 website  
Author
Li, L
Drayna, D
Hu, D
Hayward, A
Gahagan, S
Pabst, H
Cowan, MJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco
National Institute for Deafness and Communication Disorders, NIH
Department of Pediatrics, Tuba City Indian Health Services, Tuba City, AZ
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton
Source
American Journal of Human Genetics. 1998 Jan;62(1):136-144
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allele-association analysis
APACHE
Athabascan-speaking Native Americans
Autosomal recessive transmission
Genotyping
Heterogeneous genetic disorders
Linkage analysis
Linkage-disequilibrium analysis
Navajo
Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID)
Abstract
Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) consists of a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders. The most severe phenotype, T2B2 SCID, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by a profound deficiency of both T cell and B cell immunity. There is a uniquely high frequency of T2B2 SCID among Athabascan-speaking Native Americans (A-SCID). To localize the A-SCID gene, we conducted a genomewide search, using linkage analysis of ?300 microsatellite markers in 14 affected Athabascan-speaking Native American families. We obtained conclusive evidence for linkage of the A-SCID locus to markers on chromosome10p. The maximum pairwise LOD scores 4.53 and 4.60 were obtained from two adjacent markers, D10S191 and D10S1653, respectively, at a recombination fraction of v 5 .00. Recombination events placed the gene in an interval of ?6.5 cM flanked by D10S1664 and D10S674. Multipoint analysis positioned the gene for the A-SCID phenotype between D10S191 and D10S1653, with a peak LOD score of 5.10 at D10S191. Strong linkage disequilibrium was found in five linked markers spanning ?6.5 cM in the candidate region, suggesting a founder effect with an ancestral mutation that occurred sometime before 1300 A.D.
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The impact of two-way audiovideo satellite communication and a computerized health records system on the management of a rural arctic health program

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94572
Source
Pages 581-584 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
388,000 square kilometres of interior Alaska populated by some 10,000 Athabascan Indians. The health care focal point 582 Health care delivery is a 26-bed acute care hospital at Tanana, an earlier trans- portation centre and village approximately 220 kilometres west of the city of Fairbanks
  1 document  
Author
Armbrust, JM
Author Affiliation
U.S. Public Health Service, Alaska Area Native Health, Tanana Service Unit, Fairbanks, Alaska
Source
Pages 581-584 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Athabascan Indians
Computerized health record system
Fairbanks
Fort Yukon
Galena
Indian Health Service
NASA
Satellite-enabled communications
Tanana Service Unit
Two-way audio communications
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Infectious hepatitis at Fort Yukon, Alaska--Report of an outbreak, 1960-1961

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5751
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1963 Jan;53(1):31-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1963
  1 website  
Author
Maynard, JE
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1963 Jan;53(1):31-39
Date
Jan-1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Athabascan Indians
Attack rates
Diagnostic criteria
Fort Yukon
Hepatitis A
Primary water source
Abstract
An epidemic of infectious hepatitis at Fort Yukon, Alaska, demonstrating unusually high attack rates, is reported. There were significant differences in attack rates between white and Indian children, suggesting differences in immune status between these two groups. Problems of immunity, particularly the possibility of the existence of acquired long-term immunity to this disease, is discussed.
PubMed ID
13934156 View in PubMed
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Source
Alaska magazine. 1990 Jun;56(6):30-35,77,79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
Savage, M.
Source
Alaska magazine. 1990 Jun;56(6):30-35,77,79
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athabascan
Fort Yukon
Gwich'in
Medicine woman
Abstract
Marilyn Savage, a student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, wrote this story about her grandmother for a writing class. "Speaking only in her native language," Savage writes, "Granny shared with me stories about her medical practice of 50 years ago. I am fortunate to be able to translate this story from her."
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Serving indigenous people in separate and shared facilities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102126
Source
Pages 81-83 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
decisions are made not by the people who are wisest, or ablest, or closest to some throne in Washington or in Heaven, but, rather by the people who are most directly af- fected by the decisions." Tanana Chiefs Conference (TCC) was incorpo- rated in 1971 to represent43 Athabascan villages in Interior
  1 document  
Author
Dixon, M
Author Affiliation
Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center, Fairbanks, Alaska
Source
Pages 81-83 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska
Athabascan villages
Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center (CAIHC)
Health care delivery
Tanana Chiefs Conference
Abstract
This preliminary assessment suggests that, when a service area has a community with a well-developed private health care delivery system, the health care needs of indigenous people can be served optimally through a system which combines both separate and shared facilities.
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Traditional healing among Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76511
Date
March 2006
)....................................................................8 Aleut—Aleutian Islands ..........................................................................................9 Athabascan (Central Interior)..................................................................................9 Inuit—Alutiiq, Iñupiat and Yup’ik (Coastal
  1 document  
Author
Kramer, M.R.
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center
Date
March 2006
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Native
Aleut
Traditional healing
Traditional healer
Yup'ik
Haida
Allopathic Medicine
Tsimshian
Inuit
Tlingit
Shamans
Athabascan
Notes
Graduate candidate essay, author did much of her research in Alaska
Documents

TRADITIONAL HEALING AMONG ALASKA NATIVES.PDF

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6 records – page 1 of 1.