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Asthma nurse practice--a resource-effective approach in asthma management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15633
Source
Respir Med. 1999 Aug;93(8):584-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
M. Lindberg
J. Ahlner
M. Möller
T. Ekström
Source
Respir Med. 1999 Aug;93(8):584-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - nursing
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Education
Patient Participation
Primary Health Care - utilization
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an Asthma Nurse Practice (ANP) in primary health care. A 12-month (September 1994-August 1995) open, prospective intervention study with pre- and post-test comparisons was performed on patients with asthma treated at a primary care centre in Sweden. Sixty-three patients with mild or moderate asthma participated and medication, structured follow-up and education in self-management at an ANP were assessed over a 12-month period. The main outcome measures assessed were pulmonary function, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in serum, respiratory symptoms, patient knowledge of asthma and emergency visits. ANP in primary health care increased patient knowledge of asthma and medication. The number of patients with nocturnal symptoms decreased significantly. Pulmonary function was improved: vital capacity (VC) 98-106, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) 93-100 and peak expiratory flow (PEF) 98-115% of predicted (P
PubMed ID
10542993 View in PubMed
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Asthma--quality of life for Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15047
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Jul;14(6):739-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Ingela Rydström
Ann-Charlotte Dalheim-Englund
Birgit Holritz-Rasmussen
Christian Möller
Per-Olof Sandman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Jul;14(6):739-49
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - nursing - psychology
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Chronic Disease
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Sickness Impact Profile
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe how Swedish children with asthma experience their QoL and to search for possible associations between their experience of QoL and some determinants. BACKGROUND: Asthma is a chronic disorder that can restrict a child's life, physically, emotionally, socially and spiritually, and this has an impact on a child's quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-six children with asthma (37% girls and 63% boys) and 371 parents of these children participated in the study. The Paediatric Asthma Quality Of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) was used to measure the children's QoL. This questionnaire reveals how the children's asthma interferes with their normal activities, their symptoms and how this interference has made them feel. RESULTS: The findings show that most children with asthma estimated their QoL towards the positive end of the scale. The children reported more impairment in the domain of activities than in emotions and symptoms. The most commonly restricted activity was the children's ability to run. Significant associations were found between a higher QoL outcome and being a boy, as well as living in the south of Sweden. A higher QoL was also found in children with mothers older than 40 years of age and in children with cohabiting parents. It was also associated with their fathers' QoL in a positive direction. CONCLUSIONS: It is important that children with asthma will maintain a high QoL. In this study the children were being treated with asthma medication when they evaluated their QoL. Perhaps this fact might have influenced the results in a positive direction. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings of our study underline the importance of accurate nursing assessment including background variables of the children. Nurses also have to be aware that some of the children in the study have a low QoL and these children must not be forgotten. In addition, as caring tends to focus on the patients' limitations, another important issue for nurses is to try to discover those aspects in a child's daily life that contribute to a high QoL in order to improve and maintain the child's wellbeing.
PubMed ID
15946282 View in PubMed
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Childhood asthma. Helping parents cope.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186144
Source
Can Nurse. 2003 Feb;99(2):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Beverley A Clark
Karen I Chalmers
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia Nursing Program.
Source
Can Nurse. 2003 Feb;99(2):19-22
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - nursing
Canada
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Mothers - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
PubMed ID
12656012 View in PubMed
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Compliance of adolescents with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10424
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 1999 Sep;1(3):195-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
H A Kyngäs
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Nursing and Health Administration, Finland. helvi.kyngas@oulu.fi
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 1999 Sep;1(3):195-202
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Asthma - nursing - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Male
Patient Compliance - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe the health regimen compliance of adolescents with asthma and some factors related to it. The following research questions were addressed: (i) to what extent do adolescents with asthma comply with health regimens; and (ii) what type of factors are associated with compliance of adolescents with asthma? A total of 300 individuals aged 13-17 years were randomly selected from the Finnish Social Insurance Institution's register. Every 15th person on the list was included in the sample and were sent questionnaires. A total of 88% (n = 266) of adolescents returned the questionnaire. The results showed that 42% of the adolescents with asthma complied fully with the health regimens, 42% placed themselves in the category of satisfactory compliance, and the remaining 18% reported poor compliance. Compliance with the need to avoid foods, animals and pollens that cause asthma attacks was poorest, while the highest degree of compliance was observed for medication and control visits to medical staff. Background variables, such as age, family size, exercise, smoking, alcohol intake and severity of disease, were significantly associated with compliance (P
PubMed ID
10894643 View in PubMed
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A descriptive study of women's perceptions of their asthma during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190406
Source
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):98-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Claudia Anderson Beckmann
Author Affiliation
University of Missouri Kansas City School of Nursing, 64108, USA. Beckmannc@umkc.edu
Source
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):98-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Asia
Asthma - nursing - psychology
Canada
Europe
Female
Humans
Internet
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - nursing - psychology
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
To determine the impact of asthma during pregnancy from the perspective of the pregnant woman.
A descriptive survey using the Internet for subject recruitment and data collection was conducted using an adaptation of the Cancer Survivors Survey Questionnaire. Women with asthma who were pregnant or who had recently given birth (n = 166) were the sample. Women responded from the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. Physical symptoms, emotional responses, and coping strategies to deal with the asthma were queried.
Women reported a variety of respiratory difficulties including wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. They were concerned about avoiding triggers leading to acute asthma, the effect of the asthma medications on the fetus, and losing their jobs due to absenteeism. They wanted to know more about how to prevent an asthma attack and what effect their disease could have on their unborn infants.
Women need education and support to help them deal with asthma during pregnancy. Nursing can have an important role in teaching these women and helping them monitor their asthma status during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
11984278 View in PubMed
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Development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267807
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2015 Mar;71(3):535-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Ann W Garwick
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Ann M Seppelt
Wendy S Looman
Lori S Anderson
Brynja Örlygsdóttir
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2015 Mar;71(3):535-46
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - nursing
Child
Communication
Delivery of Health Care
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Global health
Health Priorities
Humans
Iceland
International Cooperation
Interprofessional Relations
Minnesota
Patient Education as Topic
Professional Practice
Risk assessment
School Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
To identify and compare how school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated care for youth with asthma (ages 10-18) and to develop an asthma school nurse care coordination model.
Little is known about how school nurses coordinate care for youth with asthma in different countries.
A qualitative descriptive study design using focus group data.
Six focus groups with 32 school nurses were conducted in Reykjavik (n = 17) and St. Paul (n = 15) using the same protocol between September 2008 and January 2009. Descriptive content analytic and constant comparison strategies were used to categorize and compare how school nurses coordinated care, which resulted in the development of an International School Nurse Asthma Care Coordination Model.
Participants in both countries spontaneously described a similar asthma care coordination process that involved information gathering, assessing risk for asthma episodes, prioritizing healthcare needs and anticipating and planning for student needs at the individual and school levels. This process informed how they individualized symptom management, case management and/or asthma education. School nurses played a pivotal part in collaborating with families, school and healthcare professionals to ensure quality care for youth with asthma.
Results indicate a high level of complexity in school nurses' approaches to asthma care coordination that were responsive to the diverse and changing needs of students in school settings. The conceptual model derived provides a framework for investigators to use in examining the asthma care coordination process of school nurses in other geographic locations.
Notes
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Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2012 Apr;33:193-20822224877
Cites: J Asthma. 2012 Jun;49(5):464-7322574718
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2012 Oct;35(5):507-1722644890
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2013 Jan;102(1):47-5222994385
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2013 Jan;69(1):91-10122489536
Cites: Pediatrics. 2013 Mar;131(3):e709-1723400614
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Apr;23(4):179-8423415278
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2013 May;69(5):1161-7122897444
Cites: Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 2013 Mar-Apr;41(2):73-8522771150
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Cites: Sleep Med. 2013 Jul;14(7):641-723684939
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PubMed ID
25223389 View in PubMed
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Education of adult patients at an "asthma school": effects on quality of life, knowledge and need for nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16129
Source
Eur Respir J. 1990 Jan;3(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
K C Ringsberg
I. Wiklund
L. Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1990 Jan;3(1):33-7
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - nursing - physiopathology - psychology
Forced expiratory volume
Hospitalization
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Education - methods
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The effect of education of adult asthma patients at a special "asthma school" was studied with regard to knowledge of the disease and its treatment and quality of life measured by leisure activities, social interaction and psychological well being. We also studied if there were any differences in number of days in hospital and emergency visits before and one year after the asthma-school. Patients were randomised to an intervention group (7 men and 13 women) and a control group (7 men and 11 women). The age-range was 22-66 yrs. Both groups answered the same standardized and quantified questionnaires on three occasions, before the start of the asthma school, after five months and after twelve months. Both groups increased their knowledge of the disease and how to treat it, with slightly better results in the intervention group. The self-assessments all showed that patients in the intervention group felt better than those in the control group. The number of days in hospital as well as acute visits to out patients clinics were reduced significantly after the asthma school. The intervention did not influence spirometric variables.
PubMed ID
2311729 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a nurse-run asthma school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15661
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1999 Apr;36(2):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
E. Pettersson
A. Gardulf
G. Nordström
C. Svanberg-Johnsson
G. Bylin
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1999 Apr;36(2):145-51
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - nursing
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education - methods
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Self Care
Smoking Cessation
Sweden
Abstract
Important aims of the study were to investigate whether an educational program (the 'Asthma School') directed by a nurse led to improved knowledge of the disease, to improved self-medication and self-management and to improved, self-rated, functional status. A total of 32 patients (6 males, 26 females, mean age 43 years) was included. The following methods were used to collect the data before and one year after the Asthma School was completed; two study-specific questionnaires for collecting demographic data and measuring different aspects of the patients' knowledge of the disease and its treatment, monthly diary cards, lung-function tests (FEV1) and the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) questionnaire. The main results of the study were an improved knowledge of the disease and its treatment, better self-management, i.e. more frequent use of the peak expiratory flow meter (PEF-meter) and use of inhaled bronchodilators on an as-required basis, fewer patients on sick-leave and a better, self-rated, physical health status. However, in spite of these encouraging results, the lungfunction was found to be unaffected, no pronounced changes in the use of asthma drugs could be found and the patients' need for medical care remained the same.
PubMed ID
10376224 View in PubMed
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Hardiness in families of young children with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15065
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 May;50(4):381-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdottir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 May;50(4):381-90
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Asthma - nursing - psychology
Attitude to Health
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Health
Female
Humans
Iceland
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
United States
Abstract
AIMS: This paper reports a study (a) to assess whether there are cultural and gender differences in parents' general well-being, sense of coherence and perception of family hardiness when they have a young child with asthma; and (b) to examine the effects of parents' sense of coherence and well-being on family hardiness. BACKGROUND: Research on hardiness, a resilience factor that fosters adaptation over time, has been widely studied from an individual perspective, but less from the viewpoint of the family unit. In particular, no study was found that assessed how members of a couple interact to affect their family's hardiness. Consideration of this dyadic phenomenon may provide unique insight about how family members interact with each other faced with a challenge, such as the chronic illness of a child. METHODS: A cross-sectional research design was used with a sample of 137 two-parent families [76 from Iceland and 61 from the United States of America (USA)]. Questionnaires measuring sense of coherence, parents' well-being and family hardiness were used, and demographic data were also collected. RESULTS: The most striking differences in well-being were between mothers and fathers. In addition to a lower average on the total score for the well-being scale, mothers had poorer scores than fathers on the subscales of depression, self-control, vitality, and general health. Family hardiness differed between countries. The regression indicated that the individual's sense of coherence, depression and positive well-being (all actor effects), as well as the partner's anxiety (partner effect) all contributed significantly to family hardiness, as did nationality. CONCLUSION: Focused interventions for families with young children with asthma should be developed to enable them to feel more confident in using their resources to meet their demands and increase parents' general well-being and family adaptation. Research is needed to develop and test such interventions, particularly with diverse participant samples, encompassing not only a variety of ethnicities, but also a range of children's ages.
PubMed ID
15842445 View in PubMed
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"I have to turn myself inside out": caring for immigrant families of children with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125510
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2012 May;21(2):224-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Ann-Charlotte Dalheim Englund
Ingela Rydström
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden. lotta.englund@hb.se
Source
Clin Nurs Res. 2012 May;21(2):224-42
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - nursing
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Nursing
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
In multicultural societies, health care professionals encounter immigrant families of children with asthma. They play an important role in supporting these families, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon. The aim of the present study is to gain a broader understanding of the challenges health care professionals face in their encounters with non-Western immigrant parents of children with asthma. Seventeen professional caregivers were interviewed, and their narratives were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that health care professionals' main challenges when encountering immigrant parents can be described by the theme, "Turning oneself inside out." This theme is characterized by five categories: gender and professional issues, impact on professional relationships, communication challenges, unfamiliar disease and treatment perceptions, and time issues. The results highlight the importance of providing health care professionals with support and organizational conditions that increase opportunities to understand the unique situation of these families.
PubMed ID
22473272 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.