Skip header and navigation

Refine By

57 records – page 1 of 6.

Accuracy of recorded asthma deaths in Denmark in a 12-months period in 1994/95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15576
Source
Respir Med. 2000 Apr;94(4):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
K E Sidenius
E P Munch
F. Madsen
P. Lange
K. Viskum
U. Søes-Petersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory medicine, Holbaek, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
Respir Med. 2000 Apr;94(4):373-7
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - classification - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Many studies of asthma mortality rely on official registration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of death certificates, where asthma was coded as cause of death. In a 12-month period, medical information on all subjects with asthma officially coded as the underlying cause of death in Denmark, was obtained by reviewing hospital records, contacting general practitioners and sometimes close relatives. A panel of four pulmonologists each examined the obtained information and independently assessed the cause of death. Of a total of 218 death certificates, 39 were excluded as the cause of death could not be validated. In 16 (9%) of the subjects death from asthma was judged to be the definite cause of death and in 12 (7%) death from asthma was possible. Of 151 non-asthma deaths coded as due to asthma, 109 were judged to have suffered or died from COPD and 14 from heart disease. The accuracy of Danish death certification in asthma deaths is poor, especially in the elderly, where COPD is often classified as asthma. We conclude that the true asthma mortality in Denmark is substantially lower than officially recorded.
PubMed ID
10845437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway basement membrane perimeter distensibility and airway smooth muscle area in asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158069
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2008 Jun;104(6):1703-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alan L James
Francis H Green
Michael J Abramson
Tony R Bai
Marisa Dolhnikoff
Thais Mauad
Karen O McKay
John G Elliot
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Physiology, West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. alj@westnet.com.au
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2008 Jun;104(6):1703-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - mortality - pathology - physiopathology
Australia
Basement Membrane - pathology - physiopathology
Brazil
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Lung - pathology - physiopathology
Lung Compliance
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Smooth - pathology - physiopathology
New Zealand
Abstract
The perimeter of the basement membrane (Pbm) of an airway viewed in cross section is used as a marker of airway size because in normal lungs it is relatively constant, despite variations in airway smooth muscle (ASM) shortening and airway collapse. In vitro studies (McParland BE, Pare PD, Johnson PR, Armour CL, Black JL. J Appl Physiol 97: 556-563, 2004; Noble PB, Sharma A, McFawn PK, Mitchell HW. J Appl Physiol 99: 2061-2066, 2005) have suggested that differential stretch of the Pbm between asthmatic and nonasthmatic airways fixed in inflation may occur and lead to an overestimation of ASM thickness in asthma. The relationships between the Pbm and the area of ASM were compared in transverse sections of airways from cases of fatal asthma (F) and from nonasthmatic control (C) cases where the lung tissue had been fixed inflated (Fi; Ci) or uninflated (Fu; Cu). When all available airways were used, the regression slopes were increased in Fu and Cu, compared with Fi and Ci, and increased in Fu and Fi, compared with Cu and Ci, suggesting effects of both inflation and asthma group, respectively. When analyses were limited to airway sizes that were available for all groups (Pbm
PubMed ID
18369095 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Asthma as an immediate cause of death]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16064
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jan 27;154(5):285-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-1992

Asthma education: the impact on care: the Quebec experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191113
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2001;Suppl 23:16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
D. Bérubé
R. Chirron
Author Affiliation
Service de Pneumologie, Hjpital Ste-Justine, Université de Montréal, PQ, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2001;Suppl 23:16-7
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Patient Education as Topic
Program Evaluation
Quebec
PubMed ID
11886129 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma mortality and occupation in Sweden 1981-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15797
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):678-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
K. Torén
L G Hörte
Author Affiliation
Section of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):678-81
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Asthma - mortality
Automobile Driving
Beauty Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to investigate mortality attributable to asthma in different occupations. The mortality from asthma among Swedish workers between 1981 and 1992 was investigated by a linkage between official mortality statistics and the occupational information in the 1980 National Census. For each occupation, a smoking-adjusted standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated. The information about smoking habits was obtained from smoking surveys carried out from 1977 to 1979. Only occupations with more than five cases were considered in the analysis. Significantly increased mortality from asthma was found among male farmers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 105-187) and male professional drivers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 144, 95% CI = 101-209) and female hairdressers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 332, 95% CI = 102-525). The increased mortality among three occupational groups (hairdressers, farmers, and professional drivers) out of 46 groups analyzed may be random occurrences. However, farmers and hairdressers are exposed to agents causing asthma, indicating that the increased mortality may be attributable to occupational exposure.
PubMed ID
9131221 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma mortality: a possible explanation of international variations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13394
Source
Chest. 1973 Apr;63:Suppl:18S-20S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1973

[Asthma mortality during a 15 year period]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16314
Source
Lakartidningen. 1972 Sep 6;69(37):4113-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-6-1972

Asthma mortality in Danish children and young adults, 1973-1994: epidemiology and validity of death certificates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15575
Source
Eur Respir J. 2000 May;15(5):844-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
I M Jørgensen
S. Bülow
V B Jensen
T L Dahm
P. Prahl
K. Juel
Author Affiliation
Dept of Paediatrics, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2000 May;15(5):844-8
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Abstract
Several reports indicate that asthma mortality has increased during the last few decades. International comparisons reveal some striking differences in the pattern of asthma mortality. The authors investigated the asthma mortality rate in the Danish child and youth population 1973-1994 and studied the validity of death certificates. The authors reviewed all death certificates coded as asthma death in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD 8-ICD 10 (1994)) and adjacent respiratory code numbers for the age group 1-19 yrs. Hospital records and autopsy reports were assessed to validate the cause of death. Age-standardized and age-specific mortality rates were calculated. From 1973 to 1987 there was a significant upward trend in the mortality. On subdivision, this trend was limited to the age group 15-19 yrs. Generally the mortality rate decreased from 1988 to 1994. Four per cent coded as asthma were false positive. Twelve per cent were false negative asthma deaths, wrongly coded as due to other causes. Only 62% of all true positive death caused by asthma were appropriately coded. The number of false negative certifications increased with increasing autopsy frequency. Asthma mortality rates in Denmark increased in adolescents during 1973-1987 and decreased from 1988 to 1994. A possible explanation may be an increased awareness of asthma symptoms combined with a steadily improved treatment of asthma. Even in children and young adults under the age of 20 yrs, validity problems still make comparisons between countries difficult; even interpretation of national trends requires caution.
PubMed ID
10853847 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 Sep;80(3 Pt 2):389-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
J. Bousquet
F. Hatton
P. Godard
F B Michel
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 Sep;80(3 Pt 2):389-94
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - mortality
Child
Female
France
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Status Asthmaticus - mortality
Abstract
Deaths caused by asthma are now recognized in all western countries, but they were only lately accepted in France because Laennec and Trousseau denied that patients with asthma may die of asthma. The "epidemic" of asthma deaths of the 1960s was not observed. Since 1968, it appears that asthma deaths decreased until 1974 for females and until 1980 for males, and then increased up to 2.9/100,000 in males and 3.6/100,000 for females. In the age group 5 to 34 years, there is a slight increase of deaths caused by asthma with a death rate of 0.35/100,000 in males and 0.39/100,000 in females. The ninth revision of the ICD did not lead to an increase in the number of reported deaths caused by asthma. In Denmark, death rates in the age group 5 to 34 years are similar to those in France, but in Germany they are much greater in number, and a clear increase was noticed. The causes of death of individuals with asthma in France are similar to causes reported in other countries, but deaths caused by specific immunotherapy may be more frequent because asthma is often treated by this form of therapy. Moreover, some deaths were associated with "corticophobia," with many patients preferring to use homeopathy or acupuncture.
PubMed ID
3624689 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma mortality in Russia between 1980 and 1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202971
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Feb;13(2):287-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
R G Oganov
Maslennikova GYa
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for Preventive Medicine of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Feb;13(2):287-9
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
There is evidence that mortality due to asthma has increased in a number of nations over the last two decades. This study was conducted to assess asthma mortality rates in Russia from 1980 to 1989. Data obtained were compared with figures from other countries. National asthma deaths were obtained from the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation. Age- and sex-specific rates per 100,000 population per year were adjusted to the European population. Annual changes in mortality rates for the study period were estimated by linear regression analysis. Between 1980 and 1989, asthma mortality rates per 100,000 population per year increased from 3.7 to 5.3 in the total Russian population. Differences according to age and sex were observed. Asthma deaths increased with age and in most cases males showed higher death rates than females. There was a statistically significant annual increase in mortality rates for young males or = 65 yrs. Asthma mortality rates in Russia between 1980 and 1989 may be considered moderate as compared with death rates reported for the same period in other countries.
PubMed ID
10065669 View in PubMed
Less detail

57 records – page 1 of 6.