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Adoptively transferred late allergic response is inhibited by IL-4, but not IL-5, antisense oligonucleotide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15653
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jul;104(1):205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
S. Molet
D. Ramos-Barbón
J G Martin
Q. Hamid
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Jul;104(1):205-14
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry - cytology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - drug effects
Cell Survival
Cells, Cultured
Cytokines - immunology
Disease Models, Animal
Immunohistochemistry
Interleukin-4 - immunology - therapeutic use
Interleukin-5 - immunology - therapeutic use
Male
Oligonucleotides, Antisense - therapeutic use
Ovalbumin - pharmacology
Pulmonary Eosinophilia - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Th2 Cells - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have shown previously that the late airways response (LAR) can be transferred by ovalbumin-primed CD4(+) T lymphocytes in Brown Norway rats. This response is associated with an increase of eosinophils and high expression of TH2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. OBJECTIVE: In this study we hypothesized that the inhibition of IL-4 or IL-5 production in the CD4(+) cells transferred to a naive animal could decrease the LAR and prevent airway eosinophilia in response to antigen challenge. METHODS: CD4(+) cells, purified from the cervical lymph nodes of ovalbumin-sensitized rats, were maintained in culture for 6 hours with medium alone or with 10 microgram/mL IL-4 antisense (AS), IL-5 AS, or control AS oligodeoxynucleotide. Then the cells were administrated intraperitoneally to naive rats, which were challenged 2 days later by a 5% ovalbumin aerosol. The lung resistance was measured for 8 hours, and then BAL was performed. Cytospin preparations from BAL cells were assessed for the presence of eosinophils by immunocytochemistry for major basic protein and for IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma expression. RESULTS: In rats injected with IL-4 AS-treated T cells, LAR, eosinophils, and IL-4 and IL-5 expression were significantly decreased compared with the other groups. Only IL-5 expression in BAL fluid was slightly decreased consequent to the transfer of IL-5 AS-treated T cells. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that, in the CD4(+) T cell-driven LAR, the early production of IL-4, but not IL-5, by the transferred CD4(+) cells is essential for the development of the LAR.
Notes
Erratum In: J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999 Dec;104(6):1188
PubMed ID
10400863 View in PubMed
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Contribution of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 in allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in sensitised brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15953
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1994 Jul;104(3):291-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
J. Sun
W. Elwood
A. Haczku
P J Barnes
P G Hellewell
K F Chung
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK.
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1994 Jul;104(3):291-5
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Cell Adhesion Molecules - immunology
Eosinophils - immunology
Female
Inflammation - pathology
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocytes - immunology
Ovalbumin
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We investigated the potential role of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in allergen-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation in sensitised Brown-Norway rats. Rats were sensitised with ovalbumin (OA) intraperitoneally and 21 days later they were either exposed to 0.9% NaCl or 1% OA aerosol for 15 min. Rats exposed to OA aerosol were pretreated either with ICAM-1 antibody (3 mg/kg i.p. and i.v., 45 min prior to OA exposure) or with the diluent for the antibody. Eighteen to twenty-four hours after OA or 0.9% NaCl exposure, rats were anaesthetised, tracheostomised and mechanically ventilated, and airway responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh) aerosol was measured as the provocative concentration of ACh needed to increase pulmorary resistance by 100% (PC100). Mean -log PC100 was increased in rats exposed to OA but pretreated with diluent (2.75 +/- 0.06) compared to rats treated with ICAM-1 antibody (2.51 +/- 0.08;
PubMed ID
7913357 View in PubMed
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Effects of CGS 21680, a selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist, on allergic airways inflammation in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15397
Source
Eur J Pharmacol. 2002 Mar 8;438(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-2002
Author
John R Fozard
Karen M Ellis
Maria F Villela Dantas
Bruno Tigani
Lazzaro Mazzoni
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Novartis Pharma AG, WSJ-386.510, CH-4002, Basel, Switzerland. john_r.fozard@pharma.novartis.com
Source
Eur J Pharmacol. 2002 Mar 8;438(3):183-8
Date
Mar-8-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - pharmacology
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Budesonide - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Inflammation - pathology - prevention & control
Lung - blood supply - drug effects - pathology
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Phenethylamines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Receptor, Adenosine A2A
Receptors, Purinergic P1 - agonists
Triazines - pharmacology
Triazoles - pharmacology
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Abstract
We have investigated the effect of 2(4-((2-carboxymethyl)phenyl)ethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680), a potent and selective agonist at adenosine A2A receptors, on pulmonary inflammation induced by allergen challenge in the ovalbumin-sensitised, Brown Norway rat. Aerosol administration of ovalbumin (5 mg x ml(-1) for 60 min; calculated dose 0.4 mg x kg(-1)) induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid leukocyte numbers, protein content and myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase activities measured 24 h post challenge. CGS 21680 (10 and 100 microg x kg(-1) given intratracheally (i.t.) 30 min before and 3 h after allergen challenge) inhibited dose-dependently all the parameters of inflammation. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with the glucocorticosteroid, budesonide (0.1, 1 and 10 mg x kg(-1) given 3 h prior to ovalbumin challenge). CGS 21680 given i.t. reduced blood pressure in anaesthetised rats at similar doses to those at which anti-inflammatory effects were manifested. Both the anti-inflammatory and hypotensive responses to CGS 21680 were blocked by pretreatment with the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, 4-(2-(7-amino-2-(2-furyl)(1,2,4)triazolo(2,3-a(1,3,5)triazin-5-yl amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385), 3 mg x kg(-1) p.o., 1 h prior to the agonist. Thus, CGS 21680 manifests broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory activity in a model of allergic asthma in the Brown Norway rat through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. The striking similarity to budesonide, a clinically used anti-inflammatory agent, suggests that adenosine A2A receptor agonists may be useful alternatives to glucocorticosteroids in the treatment of asthma.
PubMed ID
11909610 View in PubMed
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House dust mite control measures for asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93280
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(2):CD001187
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Gøtzsche P C
Johansen H K
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, Dept. 3343, Nordic Cochrane Centre. Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, 2100. pcg@cochrane.dk
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(2):CD001187
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Dust
Environment, Controlled
Humans
Insecticides
Mites - immunology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches Nov 2007), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in people with asthma known to be sensitive to house dust mites. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors applied the trial inclusion criteria and evaluated the data. Trial authors were contacted to clarify information. MAIN RESULTS: Fifty-four trials (3002 patients) were included. Thirty-six trials assessed physical methods (26 mattress encasings), 10 chemical methods, and 8 a combination of chemical and physical methods. Despite the fact that many trials were of poor quality and would be expected to exaggerate the reported effect, we did not find an effect of the interventions. For the most frequently reported outcome, peak flow in the morning (1565 patients), the standardised mean difference was 0.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10 to 0.10). There were no statistically significant differences either in number of patients improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardised mean difference -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.07), or in medication usage (standardised mean difference -0.06, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.07). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Chemical and physical methods aimed at reducing exposure to house dust mite allergens cannot be recommended. It is doubtful whether further studies, similar to the ones in our review, are worthwhile. If other types of studies are considered, they should be methodologically rigorous and use other methods than those used so far, with careful monitoring of mite exposure and relevant clinical outcomes.
Notes
Comment In: J Fam Pract. 2008 Dec;57(12):789-9219080761
UpdateOf: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(4):CD00118715495009
PubMed ID
18425868 View in PubMed
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House dust mite control measures for asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15128
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(4):CD001187
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P C Gøtzsche
H K Johansen
L M Schmidt
M L Burr
Author Affiliation
Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Dept. 7112, Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, 2100.
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(4):CD001187
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Dust
Environment, Controlled
Humans
Insecticides
Mites - immunology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: Cochrane Airways Group trials register, and PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches June 2004), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in asthmatic people known to be sensitive to house dust mites. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers applied the trial inclusion criteria, assessed their quality and extracted the data independently. Study authors were contacted to clarify information. MAIN RESULTS: Forty-nine trials (2733 patients) were included; the number of patients has more than doubled since the last version of this review. Thirty-one trials assessed physical methods, ten assessed chemical methods, and eight a combination of chemical and physical methods. Despite the fact that many trials were of poor quality and would be expected to exaggerate the reported effect, we did not find an effect of the interventions. For the most frequently reported outcome, peak flow in the morning (1339 patients), the standardised mean difference was -0.02 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.13 to 0.08). There were no statistically significant differences either in number of patients improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardised mean difference -0.01, 95% CI -0.10 to 0.13), or in medication usage (standardised mean difference -0.05, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.09). REVIEWERS' CONCLUSIONS: Chemical and physical methods aimed at reducing exposure to house dust mite allergens cannot be recommended. It is doubtful whether further studies, similar to the ones in our meta-analysis, are worthwhile. If other types of studies are considered, they should be methodologically rigorous and use other methods than those used so far, with careful monitoring of mite exposure and relevant clinical outcomes.
Notes
UpdateOf: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(3):CD00118711686981
PubMed ID
15495009 View in PubMed
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House dust mite control measures for asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15447
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(3):CD001187
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P C Gøtzsche
H K Johansen
M L Burr
C. Hammarquist
Author Affiliation
The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, 2100. p.c.gotzsche@cochrane.dk
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(3):CD001187
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Dust - adverse effects
Environment, Controlled
Humans
Insecticides
Mites - immunology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review is to assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of mite-sensitive asthmatics, assessing chemical and physical methods separately and together. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register, checked reference lists of articles and hand-searched Respiration (1980 to 1996) and Clinical and Experimental Allergy (1980 to 1996). The Cochrane Library is searched every three months. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in asthmatic people known to be sensitive to house dust mites. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers applied the trial inclusion criteria, assessed their quality and extracted the data independently. Study authors were contacted to clarify information. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-nine trials (939 patients in the analyses) were included, with two trials awaiting assessment. Nine trials assessed chemical methods alone, 15 physical methods alone, and 5 a combination of chemical and physical methods. Overall, there was no statistically significant difference improvement of asthma (relative risk 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.31), asthma symptom scores (standardised mean difference -0.07, 95% confidence interval -0.35 to 0.22), medication usage (standardised mean difference -0.14, 95% confidence interval -0.43 to 0.15), or peak flow in the morning (standardised mean difference 0.04, 95% confidence interval -0.13 to 0.21). For chemical methods used alone, there was a statistically significantly adverse effect on symptoms (P = 0.03), whereas for physical methods used alone as evaluated in parallel group trials, there was a statistically significant beneficial effect (P = 0.02). However, because of the large number of significance tests we performed, two significant results would be expected to occur by chance. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Currently available evidence from controlled trials of chemical and physical approaches to reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of mite-sensitive asthmatics does not provide a secure basis for advice and policy. Further trials - one of them very large - are currently in progress. The additional evidence from these studies will help to clarify whether or not the substantial efforts required to implement strategies intended to reduce mites can be expected to yield beneficial effects of a magnitude that people with mite sensitive asthma consider worthwhile.
Notes
UpdateIn: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(4):CD00118715495009
UpdateOf: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00118710796618
PubMed ID
11686981 View in PubMed
Less detail

House dust mite control measures for asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15480
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(2):CD001187
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P C Gøtzsche
H K Johansen
C. Hammarquist
M L Burr
Author Affiliation
The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, 2100. p.c.gotzsche@cochrane.dk
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001;(2):CD001187
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Dust - adverse effects
Environment, Controlled
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Humans
Insecticides
Mites - immunology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of mite-sensitive asthmatics. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register, checked reference lists of articles and hand-searched Respiration (1980 to 1996) and Clinical and Experimental Allergy (1980 to 1996). The Cochrane Library is searched every three months. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in asthmatic people known to be sensitive to house dust mites. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers applied the trial inclusion criteria, assessed their quality and extracted the data independently. Study authors were contacted to clarify information. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-nine trials (939 patients in the analyses) were included, with two trials awaiting assessment. There was little difference in improvement of asthma between patients in experimental groups compared to control groups (relative risk 1.04, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) 0.83 to 1.31). Asthma symptom scores were also similar for the experimental and control groups (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.07, 95% CI -0.35 to 0.22), however there was significant heterogeneity between studies p=0.015. This appears to have been due, in part, to the parallel group studies of physical treatments. These three studies (107 patients) showed a significant reduction in symptoms; SMD -0.44 (95% CI -0.83, -0.06) with no heterogeneity between the trials. No significant difference was noted for medication usage (SMD -0.14, 95%CI -0.43 to 0.15). Peak flow in the morning showed no significant difference between the experimental and the control groups (SMD 0.04, 95%CI -0.13 to 0.21). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Current chemical methods aimed at reducing exposure to house dust mite allergens seem to be ineffective and cannot be recommended as prophylaxis for mite sensitive asthmatics. Physical reduction methods may reduce asthma symptoms, but results of larger and more rigorous studies are required before any recommendations can be made concerning this approach.
Notes
UpdateOf: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00118710796618
PubMed ID
11405979 View in PubMed
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[Immune mechanisms of broncho-pulmonary diseases in aluminium production workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162209
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2007;(4):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
L A Dueva
E S Tsidil'kovskaia
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2007;(4):11-8
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Antibodies - blood
Antibody formation
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control
Bronchitis, Chronic - immunology - prevention & control
Combined Modality Therapy
Dust
Female
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Lung Diseases - immunology - prevention & control
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - immunology - prevention & control
Organic Chemicals - therapeutic use
Russia
Sclerosis
Abstract
Complex clinical examination of aluminium production workers having broncho-pulmonary diseases revealed immunologic criteria of toxic dust bronchitis, diffuse pneumosclerosis and secondary infection-dependent bronchial asthma, caused by combination of occupational hazards. Contribution of allergic environmental factors was shown as they deplete immune reserves in the workers. The authors proved efficiency of contemporary immune modulator polyoxydonium, when included into the complex therapy.
PubMed ID
17663049 View in PubMed
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What is new since the last (1999) Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194639
Source
Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:5A-27A
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Boulet
T R Bai
A. Becker
D. Bérubé
R. Beveridge
D M Bowie
K R Chapman
J. Côté
D. Cockcroft
F M Ducharme
P. Ernst
J M FitzGerald
T. Kovesi
R V Hodder
P. O'Byrne
B. Rowe
M R Sears
F E Simons
S. Spier
Author Affiliation
Hôpital Laval, Sainte-Foy, Canada. lpboulet@med.ulaval.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:5A-27A
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Allergens
Animals
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - immunology - prevention & control - therapy
Canada
Emergency medical services
Glucocorticoids - therapeutic use
Humans
Leukotriene Antagonists - therapeutic use
Mites - immunology
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Steroids
Abstract
The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999) Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children's Asthma Management Project (CAMP) study, are discussed.
Notes
Comment In: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8(2):65-811320395
Comment In: Can Respir J. 2001 Sep-Oct;8(5):38211694919
PubMed ID
11360044 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.