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ß2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms, asthma and COPD: two large population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129736
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
M. Thomsen
B G Nordestgaard
A A Sethi
A. Tybjærg-Hansen
M. Dahl
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Incidence
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is an important regulator of airway smooth muscle tone. We tested the hypothesis that three functional polymorphisms in the ADRB2 gene (Thr164Ile, Gly16Arg and Gln27Glu) are associated with reduced lung function, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We first genotyped 8,971 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study for all three polymorphisms. To validate our findings, we genotyped an additional 53,777 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study for the Thr164Ile polymorphism. We identified 60,910 Thr164Ile noncarriers, 1,822 heterozygotes and 16 homozygotes. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Thr164Ile genotype was associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) % predicted (trend p = 0.01) and FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (p = 0.001): Thr164Ile heterozygotes had 3% and 2% reduced FEV(1) % pred and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively, compared with noncarriers. The odds ratio for COPD in Thr164Ile heterozygotes was 1.46 (95% CI 1.05-2.02). In the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Thr164 genotype associated with reduced FEV(1) % pred (p = 0.04) and FEV(1)/FVC (p
PubMed ID
22075484 View in PubMed
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30-year trends in asthma and the trends in relation to hospitalization and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297877
Source
Respir Med. 2018 09; 142:29-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Margit K Pelkonen
Irma-Leena K Notkola
Tiina K Laatikainen
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Medicine, Center for Medicine and Clinical Research, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Electronic address: Margit.Pelkonen@kuh.fi.
Source
Respir Med. 2018 09; 142:29-35
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
The present study examines how trends in the prevalence of asthma during the past three decades associate with hospitalization and mortality during the same period.
Altogether 54?320 subjects aged 25-74 years were examined in seven independent cross-sectional population surveys repeated every five years between 1982 and 2012 in Finland. The study protocol included a standardized questionnaire on self-reported asthma, smoking habits and other risk factors, and clinical measurements at the study site. Data on hospitalizations were obtained from the Care Register for Health Care, and data on mortality from the National Causes of Death register.
During the study, the prevalence of asthma increased - especially in women. In asthmatic compared with non-asthmatic subjects, hospitalization was significantly higher for all causes, respiratory causes, cardiovascular causes and lung cancer. In addition, particularly in asthmatic subjects, mean yearly hospital days in the 5-year periods after each survey diminished. In asthmatic subjects, the decrease in yearly all-cause hospital days was from 4.45 (between 1982 and 1987) to 1.11 (between 2012 and 2015) and in subjects without asthma the corresponding decrease was from 1.77 to 0.60 (p?
PubMed ID
30170798 View in PubMed
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Acetaminophen, some other drugs, some diseases and the risk of transitional cell carcinoma. A population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15935
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Steineck
B E Wiholm
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Age Factors
Analgesics - adverse effects
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - adverse effects
Aspirin - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrofurantoin - adverse effects
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetracyclines
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Urologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk of transitional cell carcinoma among subjects with an intake of acetaminophen, aspirin, some other drugs and with some intercurrent diseases. The source person-time ('study base') included subjects living in Stockholm in 1985-1987. The study included 325 subjects with a transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract and 393 controls randomly selected from the source person-time. Data were obtained by a postal questionnaire supplemented by a telephone interview. A relative risk (with a 95% confidence interval) of 1.6 (1.1-2.3) was obtained after an intake of acetaminophen, adjusted for age, aspirin, gender and smoking. Conversely, a 30% decrease in risk was obtained after an intake of aspirin. No details in the exposure substantiated the finding for acetaminophen. The inherent validity problems of observational studies, and the weak evidence in this and previous studies of the association between acetaminophen and transitional cell carcinoma, makes available epidemiological evidence insufficient to regulate the use of this commonly ingested analgesic. Increased risks were, in addition, found for tetracyclines, nitrofurantoin and a history of allergic asthma and a decreased risk found for rheumatic symptoms. The findings stress the nonepidemiological data concerning the potential carcinogenicity of acetaminophen and may be a foundation for future research of some other drugs and diseases.
PubMed ID
7576740 View in PubMed
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Acute asthma among adults presenting to the emergency department: the role of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183689
Source
Chest. 2003 Sep;124(3):803-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Edwin D Boudreaux
Stephen D Emond
Sunday Clark
Carlos A Camargo
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Cooper Hospital, One Cooper Plaza, Camden, NJ 08103-1489, USA. boudreaux-edwin@cooperhealth.edu
Source
Chest. 2003 Sep;124(3):803-12
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate racial/ethnic differences in acute asthma among adults presenting to the emergency department (ED), and to determine whether observed differences are attributable to socioeconomic status (SES).
Prospective cohort studies performed during 1996 to 1998 by the Multicenter Airway Research Collaboration. Using a standardized protocol, researchers provided 24-h coverage for a median duration of 2 weeks per year. Adults with acute asthma were interviewed in the ED and by telephone 2 weeks after hospital discharge.
Sixty-four North American EDs.
A total of 1,847 patients were enrolled into the study. Black and Hispanic asthma patients had a history of more hospitalizations than did whites (ever-hospitalized patients: black, 66%; Hispanic, 63%; white, 54%; p
PubMed ID
12970001 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Adenoidectomy during early life and the risk of asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182650
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Oct;14(5):358-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Petri S Mattila
Sari Hammarén-Malmi
Jussi Tarkkanen
Harri Saxen
Janne Pitkäniemi
Marjatta Karvonen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. petri.mattila@hus.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Oct;14(5):358-62
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Welfare
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Otitis Media with Effusion - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Respiratory Sounds
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of the study was to evaluate the risk of asthma in children who had undergone an adenoidectomy, an operation frequently performed on children with glue ear or recurrent otitis media. Two surveys were carried out, a nation-wide questionnaire returned by 483 individuals (survey A) and a survey of hospital discharge records involving 1616 children who had undergone an adenoidectomy and 161 control children who had undergone probing of the nasolacrimal duct due to congenital obstruction (survey B). The questionnaire (survey A) showed that an adenoidectomy before the age of 4 years was associated with asthma (OR 3.19, 95% CI 1.25; 8.13) and with allergy to animal dust (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.27; 4.95). In survey B, asthma diagnosis was retrieved from the national asthma register. It showed also that adenoidectomy at an early age was associated with an increased risk of asthma (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.99; 15.2). There was an association between asthma and adenoidectomy, even before adenoidectomy had actually been performed. The risk of asthma was highest among children who had had adenoidectomy because of recurrent otitis media. The observed association between an adenoidectomy and asthma may be explained by an underlying factor predisposing to both recurrent otitis media and asthma.
PubMed ID
14641605 View in PubMed
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Adolescent asthma after rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119180
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013 Jul;48(7):633-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Marja Ruotsalainen
Mari K Hyvärinen
Eija Piippo-Savolainen
Matti Korppi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013 Jul;48(7):633-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis, Viral - epidemiology - virology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Rhinovirus
Risk factors
Abstract
Asthma risk is increased after bronchiolitis in infancy. Recent studies have suggested that the risk may be dependent on the causative virus. The aim of the study was to evaluate the asthma risk in adolescence in subjects hospitalized for rhinovirus or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in infancy.
At the median age of 16.5 years, a questionnaire was sent to 96 study subjects hospitalized for bronchiolitis at
PubMed ID
23129516 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with asthma: predictors of quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89880
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Apr;65(4):860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Burkhart Patricia V
Svavarsdottir Erla Kolbrun
Rayens Mary Kay
Oakley Marsha G
Orlygsdottir Brynja
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, USA. pvburk2@email.uky.edu
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Apr;65(4):860-6
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health status
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Kentucky - epidemiology
Male
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIM: This paper is a report of a study to determine the demographic, personal, interpersonal and illness factors associated with asthma quality of life (QOL), as self-reported by adolescents from the United States of America (USA) and Iceland. BACKGROUND: Asthma affects 12% of children in the USA and an estimated 9% in Iceland. Limited research has addressed asthma QOL for adolescents. METHODS: This cross-sectional exploratory study included adolescents with asthma (n = 15 from the USA; n = 15 from Iceland), aged 13-17 years, primarily recruited from paediatric practices in central Kentucky, USA and Reykjavik, Iceland. Data were collected in 2006. Adolescents in the USA (47% male) had a mean age of 14.1 years (sd = 1.5); Icelandic adolescents (73% male) had a mean age of 15.1 years (sd = 1.4). Participants completed questionnaires measuring sociodemographic and asthma characteristics, degree of limitations due to asthma, self-rated health, depressive symptoms and asthma QOL. Multiple regression was used to determine predictors of asthma QOL. RESULTS: Gender was statistically significantly associated with QOL. The difference in QOL between adolescents in the USA and Iceland was not statistically significant. Statistically significant predictors of higher asthma QOL were a better rating of overall health (P
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1772-319602013
PubMed ID
19243461 View in PubMed
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Adult asthma after non-respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in infancy: subgroup analysis of the 20-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164046
Source
Pediatr Int. 2007 Apr;49(2):190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Eija Piippo-Savolainen
Matti Korppi
Kaj Korhonen
Sami Remes
Author Affiliation
The Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. eija.piippo-savolainen@kuh.fi
Source
Pediatr Int. 2007 Apr;49(2):190-5
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - virology
Bronchiolitis, Viral - complications
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - complications
Abstract
Recent studies have stressed the influence of other viruses than respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in the development of asthma in later childhood after bronchiolitis in infancy. However, the virus-specific prognosis until adulthood has remained obscure, due to lack of sufficiently long follow-up studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate adult respiratory morbidity after bronchiolitis in infancy, focused on cases not caused by RSV.
A total of 54 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis at age
PubMed ID
17445037 View in PubMed
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Adult asthma and traffic exposure at residential address, workplace address, and self-reported daily time outdoor in traffic: A two-stage case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139159
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:716
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anna Lindgren
Jonas Björk
Emilie Stroh
Kristina Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden. anna.lindgren@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:716
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation
Young Adult
Abstract
Most epidemiologic studies use traffic at residential address as a surrogate for total traffic exposure when investigating effects of traffic on respiratory health. This study used GIS (Geographical Information Systems) to estimate traffic exposure, not only on residential, but also on workplace address, in addition to survey questions on time spent in traffic during commuting or other daily activities.The aim was to investigate 1) if there is an association between traffic exposure and prevalence of adult asthma and asthma symptoms, and 2) if so, does this association become stronger using more complete traffic exposure information.
This study was conducted in two stages: A first cross-sectional survey in Southern Sweden 2004 (n = 24819, 18-80 years, response rate 59%) was followed by a case-control study in 2005 to obtain more detailed exposure and confounder information (n = 2856, asthmatics and controls (1:3), 86% response rate). In the first survey, only residential address was known. In the second survey, questions about workplace addresses and daily time spent in traffic were also included. Residential and workplace addresses were geocoded and linked with GIS to road data and dispersion modelled outdoor concentrations of NOx (annual mean, 250 × 250 m resolution).
Living within 50 m of a road (measured by GIS) with traffic intensity of >10 cars/minute (compared with no road within this distance) was associated with an increased prevalence of asthma, (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = (1.1-2.8), and with asthma symptoms last 12 months. No statistically significant effects were seen for traffic exposure at workplace address, daily time spent in traffic, or commuting time to work, after adjustment for confounders. A combined total exposure estimate did not give a stronger association with asthma prevalence or asthma symptoms.
Traffic exposure at close proximity to residential address showed association with asthma prevalence and asthma symptoms last 12 months, among adults in southern Sweden. The associations were not stronger when accounting for total traffic exposure. This could reflect exposure misclassfication at workplace address and for other daily time in traffic, but also that residential address remains the main determinant for traffic exposure among adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21092159 View in PubMed
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896 records – page 1 of 90.