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23 records – page 1 of 3.

[A course on pediatric allergology in Reykjavik: the biggest problem is underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthmatic symptoms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16149
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Mar 15;86(11):953-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1989

Asthma. Assessment and management in a pediatric hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221319
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Apr;39:793-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
B D Lyttle
A M Hollestelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Pulmonary, Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Apr;39:793-8
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Albuterol - therapeutic use
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medicine - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Audit
Medical History Taking
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy - utilization
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Random Allocation
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To evaluate the method used to assess and subsequently manage children with asthma, a retrospective chart review was carried out at the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario in London. Charts of 78 children diagnosed with asthma were randomly selected from emergency room daily records and inpatient files. Pharmacologic management of acute asthma proved adequate, but children with daily asthma symptoms likely would not have been identified or treated.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8495137 View in PubMed
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The asthma programme of Finland: an evaluation survey in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185016
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Jun;7(6):592-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Erhola
R. Mäkinen
K. Koskela
V. Bergman
T. Klaukka
M. Mäkelä
L. Tirkkonen
M. Kaila
Author Affiliation
Finnish Lung Health Association, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Jun;7(6):592-8
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Care Surveys - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - standards - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - standards - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
To evaluate the basic structures and processes of asthma care 6 years after the launch of the Finnish Asthma Programme. The evaluation will serve as the baseline for the implementation of the evidence-based guidelines for asthma published in 2000.
A descriptive type-2 evaluation (managerial monitoring of a policy implementation), based on operationalised statements of the Asthma Programme.
A co-ordinating doctor for asthma, usually a general practitioner (GP), was interviewed in 248 (91%) health centres; 83% of the health centres have at least one GP nominated as the local asthma co-ordinator and 94% have a nurse. Asthma education for the professionals had been organised in 71% of the health centres in the previous 2 years. First-line treatment consists of an inhaled corticosteroid. Guided self-management is used in 98% of the health centres, but its components were not clear to the doctors.
The basic structure of equipment and organisation for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma has been set up in the primary health care services.
PubMed ID
12797704 View in PubMed
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Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults: executive summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117969
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Nov-Dec;19(6):e81-8
Publication Type
Article

Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Management Continuum--2010 Consensus Summary for children six years of age and over, and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145199
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):15-24
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
M D Lougheed
C. Lemière
S D Dell
F M Ducharme
J Mark Fitzgerald
R. Leigh
C. Licskai
B H Rowe
D. Bowie
A. Becker
Louis-Philippe Boulet
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mdl@queensu.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):15-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Child
Humans
Young Adult
Abstract
To integrate new evidence into the Canadian Asthma Management Continuum diagram, encompassing both pediatric and adult asthma.
The Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Committee members, comprised of experts in pediatric and adult respirology, allergy and immunology, emergency medicine, general pediatrics, family medicine, pharmacoepidemiology and evidence-based medicine, updated the continuum diagram, based primarily on the 2008 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines, and performed a focused review of literature pertaining to key aspects of asthma diagnosis and management in children six years of age and over, and adults.
In patients six years of age and over, management of asthma begins with establishing an accurate diagnosis, typically by supplementing medical history with objective measures of lung function. All patients and caregivers should receive self-management education, including a written action plan. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) remain the first-line controller therapy for all ages. When asthma is not controlled with a low dose of ICS, the literature supports the addition of long-acting beta2-agonists in adults, while the preferred approach in children is to increase the dose of ICS. Leukotriene receptor antagonists are acceptable as second-line monotherapy and as an alternative add-on therapy in both age groups. Antiimmunoglobulin E therapy may be of benefit in adults, and in children 12 years of age and over with difficult to control allergic asthma, despite high-dose ICS and at least one other controller.
The foundation of asthma management is establishing an accurate diagnosis based on objective measures (eg, spirometry) in individuals six years of age and over. Emphasis is placed on the similarities and differences between pediatric and adult asthma management approaches to achieve asthma control.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20186367 View in PubMed
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[Contemporary diagnostic methods and treatment for occupational bronchial asthma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183983
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(6):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V V Kosarev
N A Mokina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(6):25-8
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Diagnostic Services - organization & administration
Humans
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Occupational Health Services - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
Occupational bronchial asthma remains rather prevalent condition developing due to industrial allergens both of organic and inorganic origin. Diagnostic tool is a complex approach including study of occupational and allergologic anamnesis, immune and allergy status, respiratory volumes. Diagnosis leads to first therapeutic step--elimination of contact with occupational allergen. Treatment of occupational asthma includes inhalation steroids, beta 2-agonists, cholinergic antagonists, methylxanthines. Objective of this treatment is maximal control of the disease with minimal therapy facilities--these are contemporary ideas of medical management for such occupational patients.
PubMed ID
12931394 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8(2):65-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
N L Jones
Source
Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8(2):65-8
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Humans
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Spirometry
Notes
Comment On: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:41A-5A11360047
Comment On: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:35A-40A11360046
Comment On: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:29A-34A11360045
Comment On: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:5A-27A11360044
PubMed ID
11320395 View in PubMed
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Management of acute asthma in Canada: an assessment of emergency physician behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208017
Source
J Emerg Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;15(4):547-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Grunfeld
R C Beveridge
J. Berkowitz
J M FitzGerald
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Emerg Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;15(4):547-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Emergency Medicine
Hospitalization
Humans
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Patient Education as Topic
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The study objective was to assess Canadian emergency physicians for their management preferences and their compliance with recently developed guidelines for treatment of acute asthma in adults. The design was a cross-sectional survey sent to members of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) and to the emergency department (ED) directors of all Canadian hospitals with more than 25 beds in November 1992. ED directors who had not responded were sent a second survey in January 1993. The response rates for the survey were 60.1% (362/602) for ED directors and 53.4% (302/586) for CAEP members. Respondents were more likely to be from larger hospitals and to have completed some training beyond general practice level (CCFP, CCFP-EM, ABEM, FRCPC). There were wide variations among respondents in the use of objective measurements of asthma severity (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1] and peak expiratory flow rates [PEFR]), dosing of bronchodilators, and utilization of systemic corticosteroids. Forty-six percent of respondents used the FEV1 "occasionally" (22.3%) or "never" (23.8%), and 26.7% used PEFR "occasionally" (15.8%) or "never" (10.9%) in asthma management. Ninety-seven percent used nebulized beta agonist "always" (71.3%) or "often" (25.6%), but only 48.5% used the metered dose inhaler (MDI) "always" (11%) or "often" (37.5%). More than a quarter of respondents (27.2%) used doses of beta agonists that were less than those recommended (> every 30-60 min). Oral corticosteroids were prescribed at discharge only "occasionally" (51.1%), "seldom" (18.9%), or "never" (6.5%) in 76.6% of physicians. Physicians with more training were more likely to assess and treat patients according to current asthma treatment guidelines. The survey shows that many Canadian emergency physicians did not follow published recommendations for the care of patients with acute asthma. This finding was especially so with regard to objective evaluation of airflow, aggressive use of beta-agonists, the use of corticosteroids, and in making appropriate arrangements for patient discharge and follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: J Emerg Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;15(4):533-49279711
PubMed ID
9279714 View in PubMed
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Medical coverage of winter Nordic sports: an overview from the field.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101925
Source
Curr Sports Med Rep. 2010 Sep-Oct;9(5):303-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lawrence W Gaul
Author Affiliation
Nordic Sports, United States Ski and Snowboard Association, Park City, UT, USA. larry_wg@comcast.net
Source
Curr Sports Med Rep. 2010 Sep-Oct;9(5):303-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - therapy
Athletes
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Doping in Sports - prevention & control - trends
Humans
Physician's Role
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - therapy
Seasons
Sports - physiology - trends
Travel - trends
Abstract
Traveling with sports teams requires flexibility and a wide range of knowledge, as well as problem-solving abilities. Dominating the medical types of problems in the Nordic sports are the respiratory illnesses, especially asthma and upper respiratory infections (URI). Additionally, the team physician must have an awareness of antidoping issues. This overview highlights many of the issues encountered traveling domestically as well as internationally with high-level Nordic teams. Helpful links are included to facilitate the care of all levels of athletes. Additionally, a few side issues such as altitude illness and minor trauma are mentioned.
PubMed ID
20827098 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.