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Agreement between parental and self-completed questionnaires about asthma in teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15076
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2005 Mar;16(2):176-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Linnéa Hedman
Berit Lindgren
Matthew Perzanowski
Eva Rönmark
Author Affiliation
The OLIN Studies, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2005 Mar;16(2):176-81
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cough - etiology
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Parents
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Abstract
In studies of asthma in children, a common method is for the parents to complete questionnaires about their child's asthma symptoms. With longitudinal studies of asthma, children reach an age when they can complete the questionnaire themselves. The aim of this paper was to compare the prevalence of asthma symptoms as well as the agreement between responses to an asthma questionnaire completed by teenagers and their parents. As a part of the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden Study (OLIN) pediatric study, where 3345, 13-14-yr-old children completed an asthma questionnaire, 294 (84%) randomly selected parents also completed the questionnaire, which included the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of wheeze in the last 12 months, ever asthma, or physician diagnosed asthma as reported by the parents compared with the teenagers. However, the teenagers reported a significantly higher prevalence of wheeze during or after exercise. The absolute agreement was generally very high while the level of agreement (kappa-value) was slightly lower. The highest results in both absolute agreement and kappa-value, were reached by the questions on diagnosis of asthma (98.9% and 0.93), use of asthma medicines (95.5% and 0.78), and whether the child ever had had asthma (97.2% and 0.86), respectively. In conclusion, the agreement between the parents' and the teenagers' responses to the asthma questionnaire was good. The change in methodology from parental to self-completion of the questionnaire did not affect the results in the study.
PubMed ID
15787877 View in PubMed
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Allergic conditions and risk of hematological malignancies in adults: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15117
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Nov 4;4:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004
Author
Karin C Söderberg
Lars Hagmar
Judith Schwartzbaum
Maria Feychting
Author Affiliation
The Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Karin.Soderberg@imm.ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Nov 4;4:51
Date
Nov-4-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Hodgkin Disease - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Leukemia - complications - epidemiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Risk
Self Disclosure
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Two contradictory hypotheses have been proposed to explain the relationship between allergic conditions and malignancies, the immune surveillance hypothesis and the antigenic stimulation hypothesis. The former advocates that allergic conditions may be protective against development of cancer, whereas the latter proposes an increased risk. This relationship has been studied in several case-control studies, but only in a few cohort studies. METHODS: The association between allergic conditions and risk of developing leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and myeloma was investigated in a cohort of 16,539 Swedish twins born 1886-1925. Prospectively collected, self-reported information about allergic conditions such as asthma, hay fever or eczema was obtained through questionnaires administered in 1967. The cohort was followed 1969-99 and cancer incidence was ascertained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. RESULTS: Hives and asthma tended to increase the risk of leukemia (relative risk [RR] = 2.1, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.0-4.5 and RR = 1.6, 95% CI 0.8-3.5, respectively). There was also an indication of an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with eczema during childhood (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.3). CONCLUSION: In contrast to most previous studies, our results do not indicate a protective effect of allergic conditions on the risk of developing hematological malignancies. Rather, they suggest that allergic conditions might increase the risk of some hematological malignancies.
PubMed ID
15527506 View in PubMed
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Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis doubles the risk for incident asthma--results from a population study in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134312
Source
Respir Med. 2011 Oct;105(10):1449-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
P. Pallasaho
M. Juusela
A. Lindqvist
A. Sovijärvi
B. Lundbäck
E. Rönmark
Author Affiliation
Division of Allergology, Skin and Allergy Hospital, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. paula.pallasaho@fimnet.fi
Source
Respir Med. 2011 Oct;105(10):1449-56
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the incidence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, and to assess allergic rhinoconjunctivitis as a risk factor for incident asthma, we performed a 11-year follow-up postal survey.
The original study population was a random population sample of 8000 inhabitants of Helsinki aged 20-69 years in 1996. Participants in the first postal questionnaire survey, 6062 subjects, were invited to this follow-up study, and provided 4302 (78%) answers out of 5484 traced subjects in 2007.
Cumulative incidence of asthma from 1996 to 2007 was 4.0% corresponding to an annual incidence rate of 3.7/1000/year. After exclusion of those with asthma medication or physician-diagnosed chronic bronchitis or COPD at baseline in 1996, the cumulative incidence decreased to 3.5% (incidence rate 3.2/1000/year), and further to 2.7% (2.5/1000/year) when also those reporting recurrent wheeze or shortness of breath during the last year in 1996 were omitted from the population at risk. Remission of asthma occurred in 43 subjects and was 16.9% over 11 years. Cumulative 11-year incidence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was 16.9% corresponding to 16.8/1000/year, and cumulative remission was 18.1%. Incidence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was significantly lower among those who had lived in the countryside or on a farm during the first 5 years of life, but this was not true for asthma. In multivariate analysis, farm living during the first 5 years of life was protective for the development of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, OR 0.75 (95%CI 0.57-0.99). Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was a significant independent risk factor for incident asthma, OR 2.15 (95%CI 1.54-3.02). In the cohort, the prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis increased from 38.0% in 1996 to 40.9% in 2007, physician-diagnosed asthma from 6.8% to 9.4%, while current smoking decreased from 31.3% to 23.3%.
Incidence of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was higher than in earlier studies, while asthma incidence remained on similar level, both being significantly higher in women. Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis doubled the risk for incident asthma.
PubMed ID
21600752 View in PubMed
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Association between allergies, asthma, and breast cancer risk among women in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116012
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 May;24(5):1053-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Elizabeth C Lowcock
Michelle Cotterchio
Noor Ahmad
Author Affiliation
Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Ave, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L7, Canada. beth.lowcock@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 May;24(5):1053-6
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Abstract
To investigate the association between allergies, asthma, and breast cancer risk in a large, population-based case-control study.
Breast cancer cases (n = 3,101) were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry and population controls (n = 3,471) through random digit dialing. Self-reported histories of allergies, hay fever, and asthma were collected by questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between breast cancer risk and history of allergy/hay fever and asthma, with 16 possible confounders examined. Analyses were stratified by menopausal status.
A history of allergies or hay fever was associated with a small reduction in breast cancer risk [age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.86, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.96] and did not differ by menopausal status. Asthma was not associated with breast cancer risk overall; however, among premenopausal women, asthma was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (AOR = 0.72, 95 % CI 0.54-0.97).
A history of allergies may be associated with a modest reduction in breast cancer risk. Asthma does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk overall; however, asthma may be associated with reduced breast cancer risk among premenopausal women.
PubMed ID
23443321 View in PubMed
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The association between asthma and type 1 diabetes: a paediatric case-cohort study in Finland, years 1981-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298640
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):409-416
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2018
Author
Johanna Metsälä
Annamari Lundqvist
Lauri J Virta
Minna Kaila
Mika Gissler
Suvi M Virtanen
Jaakko Nevalainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):409-416
Date
04-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The association between asthma and type 1 diabetes, two chronic, immune-mediated diseases, has been of longstanding interest, but the evidence is still conflicting. We examined this association in a large, nationwide case-cohort study among Finnish children, using a novel statistical approach.
Among the initial cohort of all children born between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 2008, those who were diagnosed with asthma (n?=?81 473) or type 1 diabetes (n?=?9541) up to age 16 years by the end of 2009 were identified from the Central Drug Register maintained by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. A 10% random sample from each initial birth year cohort was selected as a reference cohort (n?=?171 138). The association between asthma and type 1 diabetes was studied using a multistate modelling approach to estimate transition rates between healthy and disease states since birth. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to represent the change in the transition rate between the disease states.
After adjusting for sex and birth decade, previous diagnosis of asthma increased the risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes by 41% (95% CI: 1.28, 1.54), whereas previous diagnosis of type 1 diabetes decreased the risk of subsequent asthma by 18% (95% CI: 0.69, 0.98).
The findings of the present study imply that the association between the diseases is more complex than previously thought, and its direction depends on the sequential appearance of the diseases.
PubMed ID
29211844 View in PubMed
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Association of asthma and hay fever with irregular menstruation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15053
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
C. Svanes
F Gomez Real
T. Gislason
C. Jansson
R. Jögi
E. Norrman
L. Nyström
K. Torén
E. Omenaas
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway. cecilie.svanes@med.uib.no
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):445-50
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Menstruation Disturbances - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that asthmatic women are more likely to have abnormal sex hormone levels. A study was undertaken to determine whether asthma and allergy were associated with irregular menstruation in a general population, and the potential role of asthma medication for this association. METHODS: A total of 8588 women (response rate 77%) participated in an 8 year follow up postal questionnaire study of participants of the ECRHS stage I in Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Only non-pregnant women not taking exogenous sex hormones were included in the analyses (n = 6137). RESULTS: Irregular menstruation was associated with asthma (OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.11 to 2.13)), asthma symptoms (OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.86)), hay fever (OR 1.29 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.57)), and asthma preceded by hay fever (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.30 to 2.96)) among women aged 26-42 years. This was also observed in women not taking asthma medication (asthma symptoms: OR 1.44 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91); hay fever: OR 1.27 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.58); wheeze preceded by hay fever: OR 1.76 (95% CI 1.18 to 2.64)). Irregular menstruation was associated with new onset asthma in younger women (OR 1.58 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.42)) but not in women aged 42-54 years (OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.32 to 1.18)). The results were consistent across centres. CONCLUSIONS: Younger women with asthma and allergy were more likely to have irregular menstruation. This could not be attributed to current use of asthma medication. The association could possibly be explained by common underlying metabolic or developmental factors. The authors hypothesise that insulin resistance may play a role in asthma and allergy.
Notes
Comment In: Thorax. 2005 Oct;60(10):793-416192360
PubMed ID
15923242 View in PubMed
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Associations of maternal atopic diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes: a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266507
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;28(6):489-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Håvard Trønnes
Allen J Wilcox
Trond Markestad
Mette Christophersen Tollånes
Rolv Terje Lie
Dag Moster
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;28(6):489-97
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Cohort Studies
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - immunology
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Registries
Rhinitis, Allergic - epidemiology
Risk
Seasons
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal asthma has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Little is known about the influence of other atopic diseases on pregnancy outcomes. We assessed how various maternal atopic diseases might affect preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death.
By linking Norwegian national registries, we acquired information on maternal health, socio-demographic factors, pregnancy, birth, and neonatal outcome on all births in Norway from 1967 to 2003.
A total of 1?974?226 births were included. Of these, 1.8% had a record of maternal asthma, 3.4% of maternal atopic dermatitis, and 0.4% of maternal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Overall rates of preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death were 6.0%, 0.6%, and 0.5%, respectively. After adjustments for possible confounders, maternal asthma was associated with increased risk of preterm birth (relative risk (RR), 1.15, [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10, 1.21]). In contrast, maternal atopic dermatitis was associated with decreased risk of preterm birth (RR 0.90, [95% CI 0.86, 0.93]), stillbirth (RR 0.70, [95% CI 0.62, 0.79]), and neonatal death (RR 0.76, [95% CI 0.65, 0.90]). Similarly, maternal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was associated with decreased risk of preterm birth (RR 0.84, [95% CI 0.76, 0.94]) and stillbirth (RR 0.40, [95% CI 0.25, 0.66]).
We confirmed the previously reported association of maternal asthma with increased risk for preterm birth. Unexpectedly, maternal atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were associated with decreased risk of preterm birth and stillbirth. Mechanisms for these protective associations are unclear, and our findings require confirmation in further studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25359226 View in PubMed
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Asthma and allergic rhinitis in the same patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16222
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jan;38(1):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1983
Author
P A Pedersen
E R Weeke
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jan;38(1):25-9
Date
Jan-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - complications - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This study from Danish general practice gives figures about the simultaneous prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis and the order of onset among 7662 patients, who during 1 year consulted for one or both of these diseases. Twenty-eight percent of patients with asthma consulted because they also had allergic rhinitis, and 17% of patients with allergic rhinitis consulted because they also had asthma. Age- and sex-distributions are presented. In 25% of patients with both diseases the onset of both diseases occurred within the same year, while in 35% the onset of asthma occurred first and in 40% allergic rhinitis. Among patients with both diseases, who did not have onset of both within the same year, more than 75% of them had onset of one disease within 2 years of the other.
PubMed ID
6837893 View in PubMed
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Asthma and atopy in schoolchildren in a defined population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211373
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Aug;85(8):965-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
S T Remes
M. Korppi
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Aug;85(8):965-70
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Skin Tests
Abstract
We investigated the frequency of allergic disorders, the pattern of allergen sensitization and serum total IgE concentration in a population-based sample of schoolchildren screened on the basis of respiratory symptoms (N = 244). The children were classified on clinical grounds into three groups, asthma (N = 43), other symptoms from lower airways (OSLA; N = 34) and control children (N = 167). The frequency of allergic disorders (allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis or dermatitis) differed significantly between children with asthma (81%), children with OSLA (62%) and in control children (48%) (p
PubMed ID
8863880 View in PubMed
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Asthma and limitation of activities in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210660
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87(6):397-400
Publication Type
Article
Author
P A Hessel
T. Sliwkanich
D. Michaelchuk
H. White
T H Nguyen
Author Affiliation
Alberta Asthma Centre, Edmonton, pat.hessel@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87(6):397-400
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age of Onset
Alberta - epidemiology
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Abstract
A study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and impact of asthma in elementary school children in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. Questionnaires were distributed at all seven elementary schools and were completed by the parents. Of the 1,457 eligible students in grades one to six, questionnaires were returned for 1,083 (74%). A history of physician-diagnosed asthma was reported for 12.9% of the children: 16.0% of boys and 9.7% of girls. Currently, 9.9% of children had asthma: 11.6% of boys and 8.2% of girls. Compared to children without, those with asthma were more than 10 times as likely to have to limit their activities for a health reason (70.5% versus 6.6%), missed school more often for health reasons (32.7% versus 14.8% missed two or more days in the previous month), reported more "colds" in the previous year and were three times as likely to have had pneumonia. The prevalence of asthma is approximately twice as high as that found in children across Canada and underscores the need to determine risk factors for asthma in this population. The finding that 1 in 10 children had asthma emphasized the need for programs aimed at children with asthma.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 1997 Mar-Apr;88(2):138-409170697
PubMed ID
9009397 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.