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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution, eczema and asthma in Sør-Varanger. Is the high consumption of corticosteroid ointments caused by increased tendency for eczema?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16024
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993
Author
H G Sunde
K A Holtedahl
Author Affiliation
Kommunehelsetjenesten i Sør-Varanger, Bjørnevatn.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Date
Jan-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Drug Utilization
Eczema - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Ointments
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Many investigations suggest that a high degree of air-borne pollution increases the prevalence of diseases like asthma and eczema. Sør-Varanger Municipality in Finnmark County in the north of Norway receives much air-borne pollution from domestic industry and from the metallurgic industry on the Kola peninsula in North-Western Russia. We have investigated indirect parameters of morbidity caused by asthma and eczema by analyzing data on drug consumption and hospital admissions. In Sør-Varanger there is high consumption of corticosteroids for dermatological use. Consumption of anti-asthmatic drugs and number of admissions to hospital for asthma and eczema were no higher than expected. We suspect that air-borne pollution, particularly the heavy metal nickel, increases the prevalence and perhaps worsens the degree of eczema in Sør-Varanger.
PubMed ID
8430405 View in PubMed
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Maternal propensity for infections and risk of childhood asthma: a registry-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267090
Source
Lancet Respir Med. 2014 Aug;2(8):631-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Jakob Stokholm
Astrid Sevelsted
Klaus Bønnelykke
Hans Bisgaard
Source
Lancet Respir Med. 2014 Aug;2(8):631-7
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Adult
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Postnatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Preconception Care - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal use of antibiotics during pregnancy has been associated with the development of asthmatic disorders in the offspring. The human microbiome has been suggested to act as an intermediary in this process. To provide clarification on this theory, we studied the temporal relation between maternal use of antibiotics and the risk of childhood asthma.
According to national registries, during the observation period (1997-2010), 910,301 children were born in Denmark and were included in the analysis. From these registries, data for cases of childhood asthma were obtained based on hospital admissions, outpatient attendance at a hospital, or use of inhaled corticosteroids. The effect of timing of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of asthma in the offspring was studied by analysis of maternal antibiotic use in the 80 weeks before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and the 80 weeks after pregnancy. Results were adjusted for age and calendar year, birthweight, gestational age, sex, mode of delivery, parity, multiple births, season of birth, and several maternal factors (age, smoking during pregnancy, employment status, and asthma).
In this study, we replicated our previous finding that maternal use of antibiotics in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma: the adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) was 1·24 (95% CI 1·18-1·30) for inpatient admission, 1·22 (1·18-1·26) for outpatient attendance, and 1·18 (1·15-1·20) for inhaled corticosteroid use. A similar and independent association was also recorded for maternal antibiotic use in the 80 weeks before and after the pregnancy. A dose-related association occurred between the risk of childhood asthma and the number of maternal antibiotic treatments and was recorded separately for antibiotic treatment for respiratory tract infections and for other types of infections.
Maternal use of antibiotics has a dose-related association with the risk of asthma in the offspring, but this association is independent of the temporal relationship with the pregnancy period. This finding suggests that maternal antibiotic use is a surrogate marker of a mother's general propensity for infections as the underlying link between a mother's use of antibiotics and risk of asthma in the offspring.
The Danish Council for Strategic Research, The Lundbeck Foundation, The Pharmacy Foundation of 1991, the Danish Medical Research Council, and National Finance Act.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Respir Med. 2014 Aug;2(8):597-825066333
Comment In: Lancet Respir Med. 2014 Oct;2(10):e1625298059
Comment In: Lancet Respir Med. 2014 Oct;2(10):e1725298061
PubMed ID
25066330 View in PubMed
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Neonatal antibiotic treatment is a risk factor for early wheezing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87032
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):697-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Alm Bernt
Erdes Laslo
Möllborg Per
Pettersson Rolf
Norvenius S Gunnar
Aberg Nils
Wennergren Göran
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Göteborg University, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, SE-416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. bernt.alm@medfak.gu.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):697-702
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Probability
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The use of antibiotics in infancy and subsequent changes in the intestinal bacterial flora have been discussed as risk factors for the development of asthma. However, it has been difficult to exclude the possibility that antibiotics have been given in early episodes of wheezing. As a result, there has been a risk of reverse causation. To minimize the risk of reverse causation, we have focused on the effect of antibiotics that are already administered on the neonatal ward. METHODS: In a cohort study of infants born in western Sweden in 2003, we studied the development of wheezing. The families of the infants were randomly selected and sent a questionnaire at child ages 6 and 12 months. The response rate was 68.5% to the 6-month questionnaire and 68.9% to the 12-month questionnaire. RESULTS: At 12 months, 20.2% of infants had had 1 or more episodes of wheezing, and 5.3% had had 3 or more episodes. Inhaled corticosteroids had been taken by 4.1% of the infants. Independent risk factors for wheezing disorder treated with inhaled corticosteroids were neonatal antibiotic treatment, male gender, gestational age of
PubMed ID
18381533 View in PubMed
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