Skip header and navigation

Refine By

105 records – page 1 of 11.

[According to the study antibiotics are not a risk factor for childhood bronchial asthma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263395
Source
Praxis (Bern 1994). 2015 Mar 11;104(6):307
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2015

Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Mar;123(3):632-819111332
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):505-1716798793
Cites: Environ Health. 2009;8:4519781087
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 2011 Jan;46(1):1-1720963782
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Sep;14(3):669-7710543291
Cites: Allergy. 2000 Dec;55(12):1163-911117274
Cites: Environ Toxicol. 2001 Jun;16(3):269-7611409199
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Oct;74(8):574-811768046
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2003 Feb;24(2):160-912568822
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 Jul-Aug;11(5):343-815332136
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1985 Aug;132(2):261-74026051
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1986 May;133(5):834-423706894
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1988 Jan-Feb;43(1):22-73355241
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Mar;139(3):587-942923355
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Mar;139(3):595-6002923356
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1991;11(2):127-331758730
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Jan;147(1):118-248420404
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1993 Sep-Oct;48(5):328-358215597
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1993 Aug;47(4):282-68228762
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;49(2):111-88161240
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Jun;48(3):237-478051521
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Nov;150(5 Pt 1):1234-427952546
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jan 15;141(2):111-227817967
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Sep;103 Suppl 6:49-538549489
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 16;312(7032):661-58597731
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1996 May;104(5):500-58743437
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 15;144(6):570-818797517
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Mar;155(3):1042-99116984
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-529279238
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Mar;11(3):677-859596121
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1998 May;25(5):299-3039635930
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1354-619877490
Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Winter;10(3):9-21 (ENG); 9-22 (FRE)9926344
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Mar 13;353(9156):874-810093979
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Jun 1;171(11):1272-815764722
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Sep;55(6):425-3116140835
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6 Suppl):S12-416157728
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Oct;35(10):1279-8716238786
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Apr;117(4):653-919440507
PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant effect of respiratory irritation on pulmonary allergic sensitization: time and site dependency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15794
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1997 Jun;144(2):356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P D Siegel
N H Al-Humadi
E R Nelson
D M Lewis
A F Hubbs
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505, USA.
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1997 Jun;144(2):356-62
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - toxicity
Ammonia - toxicity
Animals
Asthma - chemically induced - immunology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Immunoglobulins - blood - drug effects
Irritants - toxicity
Lung - drug effects - immunology - pathology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - toxicity
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Time Factors
Abstract
It has been suggested that airway irritation, by acting as an adjuvant, as well as producing damage, may be an important factor related to asthma. The present study examined the window of time following acute upper and lower airway irritant exposure to determine the period of increased risk of immunological sensitization. Brown Norway rats were exposed to 87 ppm NO2 or 1000 ppm NH3 for 1 hr. A 30-min ovalbumin (OVA) exposure of 18.14 microg/liter air was given at various times based upon the time course of irritant associated inflammatory response (either immediately prior to or 1 or 7 days after the irritant exposure). OVA-only, NO2-only or NH3-only controls, and saline controls were also studied. Weekly booster exposures of OVA (or saline) were given. Circulating OVA-specific IgE, IgA, and IgG levels were quantified periodically during the 6 weeks of the study. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was also performed to examine the inflammatory response to allergic and irritant challenge. Significant increases in OVA-specific IgE, IgG, and IgA antibody titers were seen in rats given the sensitizing OVA exposure within 1 day of the NO2, but not NH3 exposures. Enhancement of cellular infiltrate in BAL was noted in groups given the sensitizing OVA exposure within 1 day of the NO2 or NH3. It is concluded that the inflammatory and immunological response to antigen exposure can be modified by the site of respiratory tract irritation and the relative times of irritant and antigen exposure.
PubMed ID
9194420 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agents causing occupational asthma in Finland in 1986-2002: cow epithelium bypassed by moulds from moisture-damaged buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171311
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Dec;35(12):1632-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
R. Piipari
H. Keskinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. Ritva.Piipari@ttl.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Dec;35(12):1632-7
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Animals
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology - microbiology
Cattle
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fungi
Humans
Humidity
Irritants - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - microbiology
Occupations
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Workplace
Abstract
Occupational asthma is an avoidable form of asthma. In Finland, the diagnosis of occupational asthma entitles substantial compensation to the employee. The diagnostics are based on symptoms, exposure assessment, allergologic investigations, follow-up of peak expiratory flow (PEF) at work and at home and, in many cases, specific challenge tests.
To study the causative agents of occupational asthma in Finland.
The causative agents and the numbers of new occupational asthma cases notified to the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD) during 1986-2002 are reported.
The number of occupational asthma cases increased from 1986 until 1995, after which a downward trend, stabilizing during the last few years, has been observed. The majority of the cases (59%) in the beginning of the period (1986-1990) were associated with agriculture, but the percentage has fallen thereafter (42% of the cases in 1998-2002) along with the fall in the total number of cases. Since 1995, indoor moulds from water-damaged buildings have caused an increasing number of cases and have become the most important causative agents (0.5% cases, in 1986-1990 and 18% of the cases in 1998-2002). Chemicals have caused 10-30% of the cases, a decreasing number since 1990. The most important chemicals causing occupational asthma have been diisocyanates and welding fumes, followed by hairdressing chemicals and formaldehyde.
The number of occupational asthma cases in Finland reached its height in the mid-1990s. The decrease in the number of total cases is because of the decrease in agriculture-associated cases, reflecting the number of employees in agriculture-associated occupations, which has greatly decreased since Finland joined the EU in 1995. An epidemic of mould-induced asthma, affecting mostly white-collar employees working in moisture-damaged buildings, has taken place since 1995.
PubMed ID
16393330 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air pollution, asthma and allergy--the importance of different types of particles]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15327
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2002
Author
Heidi Ormstad
Martinus Løvik
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljøimmunologi, Divisjon for miljømedisin, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen 0403 Oslo. heidi.ormstad@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Date
Aug-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - etiology
Dust - adverse effects
English Abstract
Heating - adverse effects
Humans
Motor Vehicles
Particle Size
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - etiology
Rubber - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Particulate air pollution has been much discussed in Norway during the last few years. Coarse particles from asphalt are likely to have quite different properties than the far smaller particles from diesel exhaust. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the basis of data from the literature and our own research, we discuss the health problem of different types of particles with a focus on allergy and respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Diesel exhaust particles have well-documented adverse effects in relation to allergic airway disease. They increase symptoms load in already allergic individuals and also seem to contribute to the increased prevalence of allergy. PM10 is today measured on the basis of weight, not on number. Diesel exhaust particles are much smaller than road surface particles; hence PM10 measurements reflect road surface dust pollution more than exhaust particles. INTERPRETATION: Focus should now be given to diesel exhaust particles in order to reduce the adverse health effects of particulate air pollution in Norwegian cities.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):176612362683
PubMed ID
12362688 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air pollution, eczema and asthma in Sør-Varanger. Is the high consumption of corticosteroid ointments caused by increased tendency for eczema?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16024
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993
Author
H G Sunde
K A Holtedahl
Author Affiliation
Kommunehelsetjenesten i Sør-Varanger, Bjørnevatn.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Date
Jan-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Drug Utilization
Eczema - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Ointments
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Many investigations suggest that a high degree of air-borne pollution increases the prevalence of diseases like asthma and eczema. Sør-Varanger Municipality in Finnmark County in the north of Norway receives much air-borne pollution from domestic industry and from the metallurgic industry on the Kola peninsula in North-Western Russia. We have investigated indirect parameters of morbidity caused by asthma and eczema by analyzing data on drug consumption and hospital admissions. In Sør-Varanger there is high consumption of corticosteroids for dermatological use. Consumption of anti-asthmatic drugs and number of admissions to hospital for asthma and eczema were no higher than expected. We suspect that air-borne pollution, particularly the heavy metal nickel, increases the prevalence and perhaps worsens the degree of eczema in Sør-Varanger.
PubMed ID
8430405 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air quality and the frequency of emergency room visits for asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215622
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1995 Mar;74(3):269-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
S. Kesten
J. Szalai
B. Dzyngel
Author Affiliation
Asthmas Center, Toronto Hospital, Canada.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1995 Mar;74(3):269-73
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants
Asthma - chemically induced - physiopathology
Canada
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Peroxides - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
Atmospheric pollution has been proposed as one of the possible factors responsible for increases in asthma mortality and morbidity.
We sought to examine whether we could demonstrate a relationship between emergency room visits for asthma and alterations in environmental conditions.
Over a 1-year period, the frequency of emergency room visits for asthma in a large urban hospital were documented and compared to outdoor concentrations of SO2, NO2, and ozone in addition to two overall measures of air quality (air pollution index and air quality index).
A total of 854 emergency room visits were noted with the highest number of visits occurring in May and between September and December. Significant variations in the frequency of visits as well as environmental conditions could be seen on a daily basis. Despite comparisons of results on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis, no significant relationships could be found between any of the pollution indices and emergency room visits. Staggering visits by 1 and 7 days, however, revealed a relationship between emergency room visits and air pollution index and air quality index. An association between emergency room visits and NO2 and ozone was seen when visits were staggered by 7 but not by 1 day.
We conclude the fluctuations in overall air quality are associated with increased frequency of emergency room visits but only when data are lagged by a predefined period.
PubMed ID
7889385 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic disease, immunoglobulins, exposure to mercury and dental amalgam in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15819
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):339-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
N. Holthuis
A. Schütz
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):339-42
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Eczema - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulins - analysis
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - blood
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High-dose exposure to inorganic mercury in man can influence the immune system and in rare cases cause immune-related disease. Some experimental animals also react with autoimmunity after low doses of inorganic mercury. Glomerulonephritis and an increased formation of immunoglobulin type E (IgE) are characteristic of these reactions. A recent study of 15-year-old adolescents demonstrated an association between immunoglobulin type A (IgA) and mercury concentration in plasma (P-Hg). There was also an association between allergic disease and IgA levels. The present study included 54 male and 23 female 19-year-old students who were recruited from a cohort that had been previously defined in a survey of allergic disease. Of the students, 39 (51%) had asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or eczema. Similar amalgam burden and P-Hg levels were observed in students with (n = 39) and without (n = 38) allergic disease (P = 0.48 and P = 0.98, respectively). As expected, IgE levels were significantly higher in the group with allergic disease (P = 0.006), but there was no association between P-Hg and IgE. The P-Hg levels were very low (median 1.50 nmol/l) and correlated significantly (r = 0.31) with the small number of amalgam surfaces (P = 0.007). Thirty-seven students had no amalgam fillings. P-Hg levels did not associate significantly with IgA, but did so with IgG2 (r = 0.33; P = 0.003). No conclusive correlation was observed between IgG2 and amalgam fillings. The findings of this study in 19-year-old subjects differ from earlier data obtained in a sample 4 years younger. The possibility of chance in the association between P-Hg levels and IgG2 must, however, be considered.
PubMed ID
9192218 View in PubMed
Less detail

105 records – page 1 of 11.