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Acetaminophen, aspirin and progression of advanced chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153050
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 Jun;24(6):1908-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Marie Evans
Carl Michael Fored
Rino Bellocco
Garrett Fitzmaurice
Jon P Fryzek
Joseph K McLaughlin
Olof Nyrén
Carl-Gustaf Elinder
Author Affiliation
Nephrology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. marie.evans@ki.se
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 Jun;24(6):1908-18
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Renal Replacement Therapy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Although many studies have investigated the possible association between analgesic use (acetaminophen and aspirin) and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the effect of analgesics on the progression of established CKD of any cause has not yet been investigated.
In this population-based Swedish cohort study, we investigated the decline over 5-7 years in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) among 801 patients with incident, advanced CKD (serum creatinine >3.4 mg/dL for men, >2.8 mg/dL for women for the first time) and with different analgesic exposures. Lifetime analgesic use and current regular use were ascertained through in-person interviews at inclusion while data on analgesic use during the follow-up was abstracted from the medical records at the end of the study period. A linear regression slope, based on their eGFR values during the follow-up, provided a summary of within-individual change. In the final multivariate analyses, a linear mixed effects model was implemented to assess the relation of analgesic use and change in eGFR over time.
The progression rate for regular users of acetaminophen was slower than that for non-regular users (regular users progressed 0.93 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year slower than non-regular users; 95% CI 0.03, 1.8). For regular users of aspirin, the progression rate was significantly slower than that for non-regular users (regular users progressed 0.80 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year slower than non-regular users; 95% CI 0.1, 1.5). Different levels of lifetime cumulative dose of acetaminophen and aspirin did not significantly affect the progression rate.
We suggest that single substance acetaminophen and aspirin may be safe to use by patients with diagnosed advanced CKD stage 4-5 without an adverse effect on the progression rate of the disease.
PubMed ID
19155536 View in PubMed
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[A management program for primary thrombocytopenia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64018
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3431-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
H. Knutsen
O. Bruserud
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Sentralsykehuset i Akershus, Nordbyhagen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3431-4
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Aspirin - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Hydroxyurea - administration & dosage
Interferon Type I, Recombinant - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic - diagnosis - drug therapy
Regional Medical Programs
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Thrombocythemia, Hemorrhagic - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Abstract
Essential thrombocythemia is a chronic myeloproliferative disease characterized by persistent thrombocytosis and an increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Most patients are asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis. In this article guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of this disorder are presented on behalf of the Norwegian Society of Hematology. On the basis of a literature search in international databases (Medline) and international medical journals, articles have been selected according to their clinical relevance. The risk of major thrombosis is higher in patients older than 60 years and highest among those with a previous occlusive event. In individual patients there is no clear relationship between platelet count and risk of thrombosis. Low-dose aspirin (75-100 mg/day) is recommended to all patients with platelet count
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 10;120(4):512-310833946
PubMed ID
10553341 View in PubMed
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Anticoagulant medication at time of needle biopsy for breast cancer in relation to risk of lymph node metastasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103076
Source
Int J Cancer. 2014 Jul 1;135(1):238-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2014
Author
Rickard Ljung
Roland Sennerstam
Fredrik Mattsson
Gert Auer
Jesper Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2014 Jul 1;135(1):238-41
Date
Jul-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Biopsy, Needle
Blood Coagulation - drug effects
Blood Platelets - drug effects - pathology
Breast Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - pathology
Early Detection of Cancer
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis - pathology - prevention & control
Mammography
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
Anticoagulant treatment might enhance the natural defense against tumor cell dissemination caused by diagnostic needle biopsy by counteracting thrombocyte coating of such cells. To clarify whether women using anticoagulant treatment at the time of biopsy have a lower occurrence of lymph node metastasis, we conducted a nationwide Swedish cohort study of 26,528 female incident breast cancer patients in 2006-2011. Point risk ratio (RR) of risk of lymph node metastasis among users of anticoagulant treatment adjusted for age, T-stage, socioeconomic factors, and concomitant medication was RR?=?0.94, (95% CI: 0.87-1.03), and lower in younger women (RR?=?0.80, 95% CI 0.50-1.29). Although nonsignificant, these associations may underestimate a true negative association since women using anticoagulant treatment are likely to have more concomitant diseases, lead an unhealthier lifestyle, and have lower participation in mammography screening. These findings provide some support for the hypothesis that anticoagulant medications might counteract breast cancer spread caused by needle biopsy.
PubMed ID
24346771 View in PubMed
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Antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized in Alaska with atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5166
Source
Alaska Med. 1998 Oct-Dec;40(4):79-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
M E Gordian
H D Mustin
Author Affiliation
PRO-West/Alaska, Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1998 Oct-Dec;40(4):79-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Aspirin - administration & dosage
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - drug therapy
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Data Collection
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - administration & dosage
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medicare
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
United States
Warfarin - administration & dosage
Abstract
Although warfarin therapy reduces the risk of stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the risk of hemorrhagic complications and other concerns may make clinicians reluctant to prescribe this treatment for elderly patients. Aspirin is a lower-risk alternative to warfarin but is also less effective. This study examines the use of antithrombotic therapy with warfarin or aspirin at hospital discharge among 182 Medicare beneficiaries 65 or older with chronic AF who were admitted to nine Alaska hospitals during 1996. Sixty-five percent of patients without contraindications were discharged on warfarin, and an additional 16% received aspirin. The rate of anticoagulation with warfarin was much higher among patients aged 65-74 (95%) than among those 75 or older (45%). The relatively low rate of warfarin use for very elderly patients may represent an opportunity to improve care. Although these patients have the highest risk of hemorrhagic complications, they also have the greatest potential to benefit from anticoagulation.
PubMed ID
10202404 View in PubMed
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Aspirin (75 mg/day) after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease: long-term effects on the risk for myocardial infarction, occurrence of severe angina and the need for revascularization. Research Group on Instability in Coronary Artery Disease in Southeast Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55199
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Dec;18(7):1587-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
L C Wallentin
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Dec;18(7):1587-93
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Angina, Unstable - drug therapy - epidemiology - radiography
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In this study, 796 men with unstable coronary artery disease (that is, unstable angina or non-Q wave myocardial infarction) were randomized to double-blind placebo-controlled treatment with aspirin (75 mg/day). The long-term efficacy was judged from the occurrence of myocardial infarction or death or severe angina necessitating referral to coronary angiography. The risk of myocardial infarction or death was reduced during aspirin treatment--after 1 year, the risk ratio was 0.52 (confidence interval 0.37 to 0.72). Severe angina necessitating referral to coronary angiography was less common during aspirin therapy--after 3 months, the risk ratio was 0.59 (0.42 to 0.84) and after 1 year 0.71 (0.56 to 0.91). The combined event rate of myocardial infarction or death or referral to coronary angiography was reduced; after 3 months, the risk ratio was 0.44 (0.30 to 0.66) and after 1 year 0.65 (0.54 to 0.79). The 75-mg aspirin dose was well tolerated and had a high level of patient compliance. Treatment with aspirin (75 mg/day) should be recommended to all men for greater than or equal to 3 months after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease. Long-term therapy should be considered if there are no contraindications or side effects.
Notes
Comment On: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Dec;18(7):1617-261960305
PubMed ID
1960301 View in PubMed
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Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in relation to Hodgkin lymphoma risk in northern Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98435
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Jan;19(1):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Ellen T Chang
Deirdre P Cronin-Fenton
Søren Friis
Henrik Hjalgrim
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Lars Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Northern California Cancer Center, 2201 Walnut Avenue, Suite 300, Fremont, CA 94538, USA. ellen@nccc.org
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Jan;19(1):59-64
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage
Aspirin - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There are few known modifiable risk factors for Hodgkin lymphoma, but the recent finding of an inverse association between routine regular-strength aspirin use and Hodgkin lymphoma risk suggests that aspirin may protect against Hodgkin lymphoma development. To further investigate this association using prospectively collected data, we conducted a population-based case-control study in northern Denmark. A total of 478 incident Hodgkin lymphoma cases were identified in nationwide health-care databases from 1991 to 2008. Ten population controls were matched to each case on age, sex, and county using risk-set sampling. Use of aspirin, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) from 1989 to 2007 was ascertained by linkage to a population-based prescription database. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for associations between medication use and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for ever use (>2 prescriptions) compared with never/rare use (2 prescriptions in the 1-2 years before the index date), short-term use ( or =25% of duration of use covered by prescription) of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors or other NSAIDs was associated with increased Hodgkin lymphoma risk possibly due to prodromal symptoms among cases. In conclusion, our results provide some evidence of a protective effect of low-dose aspirin, but not other NSAIDs, against Hodgkin lymphoma development.
PubMed ID
20056623 View in PubMed
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Aspirin compared with acetaminophen in the treatment of fever and other symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in adults: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single-dose, 6-hour dose-ranging study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83279
Source
Clin Ther. 2005 Jul;27(7):993-1003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Bachert Claus
Chuchalin Alexander G
Eisebitt Reinhard
Netayzhenko Vasiliy Z
Voelker Michael
Author Affiliation
University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium. claus.bachert@ugent.be
Source
Clin Ther. 2005 Jul;27(7):993-1003
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fever - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - virology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and acetaminophen (paracetamol) are frequently used to treat fever and other symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Both are available over the counter for use at the standard recommended doses of 500 and 1000 mg per single use. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the efficacy, safety profiles, and tolerability of aspirin 500 and 1000 mg and acetaminophen 500 and 1000 mg compared with placebo in adult patients with acute febrile URTI of suspected viral origin. METHODS: This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial conducted in Ukraine and Russia. Patients with URTI and acute fever of > or =38.5 degrees C received a single dose of aspirin 500 or 1000 mg, acetaminophen 500 or 1000 mg, or matching placebo. Oral body temperature was measured in the clinic at specified time points up to 6 hours after dosing. The intensity of other symptoms of URTI was rated by patients at baseline and at 2, 4, and 6 hours after dosing (scale from 0 = none to 10 = severe). The primary efficacy measure was the AUC for the change in orally measured body temperature from the time of treatment (baseline) to 4 hours after dosing. Secondary outcome measures included the change in body temperature from baseline to specified time points between 0.5 and 6 hours after dosing, the difference between baseline and the lowest measured body temperature, the time to the lowest measured body temperature, and the intensity of other symptoms of URTI (ie, headache, sinus sensitivity to percussion, sore throat, achiness, and feverish discomfort). Tolerability was monitored by recording of adverse events. RESULTS: Three hundred ninety-two patients were enrolled (78 in both aspirin groups, 79 in both acetaminophen groups, 78 in the placebo group). Demographic and baseline characteristics were comparable in the 5 groups; 51% of patients were male, with a mean age of 37.4 years and a mean body weight of 74.3 kg. The AUC values for the change in body temperature 0 to 4 hours after dosing were 3.18 (95% CI, 2.78-3.57) for aspirin 500 mg, 4.26 (95% CI, 3.84-4.68) for aspirin 1000 mg, 3.13 (95% CI, 2.77-3.49) for acetaminophen 500 mg, 4.11 (95% CI, 3.73-4.49) for acetaminophen 1000 mg, and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.38-1.13) for placebo. In terms of the primary efficacy variable, all active treatments were significantly superior to placebo (P
PubMed ID
16154478 View in PubMed
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Aspirin, hydroxychloroquine, and hepatic enzyme abnormalities with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228097
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1990 Nov;33(11):1611-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
J F Fries
G. Singh
L. Lenert
D E Furst
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305.
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 1990 Nov;33(11):1611-9
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Analysis of Variance
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - enzymology
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Canada
Drug Therapy, Combination
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxychloroquine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Liver - drug effects - enzymology
Methotrexate - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
United States
Abstract
Levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from 5 centers involved in the Arthritis, Rheumatism, and Aging Medical Information System were correlated with the use of specific antirheumatic medications. Elevated levels of SGOT and SGPT were most frequent in patients taking salicylates and methotrexate (MTX) and least frequent in patients taking hydroxychloroquine. The combination of MTX and salicylates greatly increased the frequency of abnormal liver enzyme values. In contrast, the addition of hydroxychloroquine to a regimen of either MTX or aspirin essentially eliminated the SGOT and SGPT abnormalities. Results from all 5 centers were consistent and remained so after adjustment for age, sex, and disease duration. Knowledge of these important drug interactions may permit continuation of MTX therapy in patients in whom the drug might otherwise be discontinued.
Notes
Comment In: Arthritis Rheum. 1992 Jan;35(1):126-81346249
PubMed ID
2242059 View in PubMed
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Aspirin intake and breast cancer survival - a nation-wide study using prospectively recorded data in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258824
Source
BMC Cancer. 2014;14:391
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Michelle D Holmes
Henrik Olsson
Yudi Pawitan
Johanna Holm
Cecilia Lundholm
Therese M-L Andersson
Hans-Olov Adami
Johan Askling
Karin Ekström Smedby
Source
BMC Cancer. 2014;14:391
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aspirin - administration & dosage
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Aspirin (ASA) use has been associated with improved breast cancer survival in several prospective studies.
We conducted a nested case-control study of ASA use after a breast cancer diagnosis among women using Swedish National Registries. We assessed prospectively recorded ASA exposure during several different time windows following cancer diagnosis using conditional logistic regression with breast cancer death as the main outcome. Within each six-month period of follow-up, we categorized dispensed ASA doses into three groups: 0, less than 1, and 1 or more daily doses.
We included 27,426 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 2005 and 2009; 1,661 died of breast cancer when followed until Dec 31, 2010. There was no association between ASA use and breast cancer death when exposure was assessed either shortly after diagnosis, or 3-12 months before the end of follow-up. Only during the period 0-6 months before the end of follow-up was ASA use at least daily compared with non-use associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer death: HR (95% CI)?=0.69 (0.56-0.86). However, in the same time-frame, those using ASA less than daily had an increased risk of breast cancer death: HR (95% CI)?=1.43 (1.09-1.87).
Contrary to other studies, we did not find that ASA use was associated with a lower risk of death from breast cancer, except when assessed short term with no delay to death/end of follow-up, which may reflect discontinuation of ASA during terminal illness.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24890520 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.