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Aging, culture, and memory for socially meaningful item-context associations: an East-West cross-cultural comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114673
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60703
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lixia Yang
Juan Li
Julia Spaniol
Lynn Hasher
Andrea J Wilkinson
Jing Yu
Yanan Niu
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. lixiay@psych.ryerson.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60703
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology
Association Learning - physiology
Canada
Culture
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Memory - physiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Photic Stimulation
Social Identification
Abstract
Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older) and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older). All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23593288 View in PubMed
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Asian ethnicity and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritic total knee arthroplasty population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152119
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2010 Apr;25(3):416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Rajiv Gandhi
Fahad Razak
Peggy Tso
J Roderick Davey
Nizar N Mahomed
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2010 Apr;25(3):416-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - surgery
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA). We asked whether the prevalence of MS varies across ethnicity among patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for end-stage OA. In our population of 1460 patients undergoing primary knee arthroplasty, MS was defined as body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Among the 1334 white patients, 114 (8.5%) had MS as compared with 3 of 36 (8.3%) blacks and 18 of 90 (20%) Asians (P = .006) Adjusted analysis showed that those of Asian ethnicity had a 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.8; P = .03) times greater odds of MS as compared with those of other ethnicity. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for OA, and Asians demonstrate a greater prevalence of MS as compared with whites and blacks in this population.
PubMed ID
19278817 View in PubMed
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Beyond SARS: ethnic community organization's role in public health -- a Toronto experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153820
Source
Promot Educ. 2008 Dec;15(4):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Weizhen Dong
Author Affiliation
PhD, University of Waterloo, Canada. weizhen@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2008 Dec;15(4):53-5
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
China - ethnology
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Disaster planning
Disease Outbreaks
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Health
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The SARS outbreak in Toronto was a public health crisis. It was particularly frightening to the Chinese-Canadians, because of the origin of the deadly disease. The Chinese-Canadian community organizations launched various activities to help the Chinese-Canadians as well as other Asian-Canadian communities to fight against SARS and its social side-effects. From launching the SARS Supporting Line, distributing health promotional material, disseminating SARS related information, paying tribute to frontline health workers, and promoting local business, to fundraising for SARS related research; they played an active role in easing the public's anxiety, especially for the Chinese-Canadians in the great Toronto area. The culturally diverse population brought problems as well as solutions. Ethnic groups have expertise in almost all areas, including people with leadership skills. The Toronto Chinese community's experience in combating SARS is a good example. The Chinese-Canadian community organizations' activities during the SARS outbreak demonstrate that ethnic minority organizations can play an important role in public health, especially in a public health crisis, and beyond.
PubMed ID
19066240 View in PubMed
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California's racial and ethnic minorities more adversely affected by asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78564
Source
Policy Brief UCLA Cent Health Policy Res. 2007 Feb;(PB2007-3):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Meng Ying-Ying
Babey Susan H
Hastert Theresa A
Brown E Richard
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, Los Angeles, California USA.
Source
Policy Brief UCLA Cent Health Policy Res. 2007 Feb;(PB2007-3):1-7
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - ethnology - therapy
California
Child
Cockroaches
Cost of Illness
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Hispanic Americans - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Minority Groups
Sick Leave
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract
In California, nearly 2.8 million adults and children (8%) had active asthma in 2003. Of Californians with active asthma, 890,000 are children (ages 0-17) and 1.8 million are adults (age 18 and above). The prevalence of active asthma varies by racial and ethnic group, with racial and ethnic minority groups affected more adversely by asthma. They are more likely to go to the emergency department for asthma care, miss more school and work days because of asthma, and have poorer health status. They are also more likely to lack access to health care and to live in conditions associated with asthma exacerbations. Among California children, the prevalence of active asthma varies by racial and ethnic groups-with the highest prevalence among African Americans (17%) and American Indians/Alaska Natives (17%), followed by whites (10%), Latinos (7%) and Asians (7%; Exhibit 1). Among adults, American Indians/Alaska Natives have the highest prevalence of active asthma (13%), followed by African Americans (10%), whites (9%), Asians (5%) and Latinos (5%). The National data similarly show that both African Americans and American Indians have higher current asthma prevalence rates than non- Hispanic whites.
PubMed ID
17338094 View in PubMed
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A comparison of Chinese and non-Chinese Canadian patients hospitalized with heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105738
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Darwin F Yeung
Nicole K Van Dyke
Laura C Maclagan
Gordon W Moe
Baiju R Shah
Maria Chiu
Douglas S Lee
Dennis T Ko
Ching Lau
Jack V Tu
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, 2075 Bayview Avenue G250, Toronto ON, Canada. tu@ices.on.ca.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:114
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - ethnology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Ontario - ethnology
Abstract
Canadians of Chinese descent, represent one of the fastest growing visible minority groups in Canada, (as well as the second largest), but relatively little is known about the clinical features of heart failure (HF) in Chinese-Canadian versus non-Chinese Canadian patients.
We conducted a population-based analysis of urban patients hospitalized in Ontario, Canada for the first time with a most responsible diagnosis of HF between April 1, 1995 and March 31, 2008. Among the 99,278 patients, 1,339 (1.3%) were classified as Chinese using a previously validated list of Chinese surnames. Through linkage to other administrative databases, we compared the clinical characteristics, pharmacological management, and outcomes of Chinese versus non-Chinese HF patients.
Ischemic heart disease was identified as the possible etiology of HF in a greater proportion of non-Chinese patients (47.7% vs. 35.3%; p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24325765 View in PubMed
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Comparisons of catastrophizing, pain attitudes, and cold-pressor pain experience between Chinese and European Canadian young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143703
Source
J Pain. 2010 Nov;11(11):1187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Annie Y Hsieh
Dean A Tripp
Li-Jun Ji
Michael J L Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 4ah8@queensu.ca
Source
J Pain. 2010 Nov;11(11):1187-94
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology
Attitude - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Catastrophization - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - etiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Pain Measurement - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Experimental pain research indicates ethnic differences in pain experience. Most of the cross-cultural pain research studied African Americans and Hispanics with little data available for Asian groups. This study examined differences in pain catastrophizing, pain attitudes, and pain responses between Chinese and European Canadian young adults. Prior to completing a cold-pressor (CP) task, 80 Chinese and 80 European Canadian undergraduate students were administered measures of pain catastrophizing and pain attitudes, including stoicism and cautiousness. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain intensity were measured during the CP task. The Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire was administered immediately postimmersion to measure sensory and affective pain. While there was no group difference in pain threshold and pain intensity, Chinese participants displayed lower pain tolerance and reported higher SF-MPQ-Affective than European Canadians. Regarding psychological variables, there was no difference in stoicism and cautiousness between groups, but Chinese participants reported greater pain catastrophizing. Mediational analysis indicated that pain catastrophizing mediated the group differences in SF-MPQ-Affective score. The implications of the findings and future research were discussed.
The study found ethnic differences in cold-pressor responses, in which Chinese undergraduates reported higher levels of pain compared to their Euro-Canadian counterparts. The finding that pain catastrophizing mediated the ethnic difference in SF-MPQ-Affective scores indicated the importance of examining the role of catastrophizing in pain reports from Chinese and Euro-Canadian patients.
PubMed ID
20452836 View in PubMed
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CONTRIBUTION OF CEREBRAL VASCULAR ANOMALIES IN HEMORRHAGIC STROKE STRUCTURE IN DIFFERENT RACIAL GROUPS OF YAKUTIA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270935
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):604-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
S A Chugunova
T Y Nikolaeva
A. Semenov
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):604-7
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cerebral Hemorrhage - epidemiology - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Sex Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Hemorrhagic stroke (HS) has higher incidence in Asian population compared to Caucasian. The reason for this phenomenon is not clearly understood.
To investigate the contribution of cerebral vascular anomalies in hemorrhagic stroke structurein different racial groups of Yakutia.
The study group included 1078 consecutively hospitalized patients with acute HS. A comparative analysis of demographic data and frequency of CVA, which were identified as a cause of HS, was carried out between the group of indigenous patients of Asian race and the group of Caucasian patients.
The proportion of hemorrhage due to rupture of cerebralarterial aneurysms (CAA) in the hospital HS structure was higher in Asians, compared to Caucasians (p = 0.001; OR = 1.7; 95% CL: 1.2-2.4). No difference in the arteriovenous malformations' (AVM) frequency was found between groups (p = 0.345), as well as in age and gender distribution (p = 0.052 and p = 0.759, respectively). The CAA frequency was higher among female patients compared to male in both racial groups (p
PubMed ID
26887148 View in PubMed
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Craniofacial profile in Asian and white subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174536
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):504-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
B. Lam
M S M Ip
E. Tench
C F Ryan
Author Affiliation
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
Source
Thorax. 2005 Jun;60(6):504-10
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
British Columbia - ethnology
Cephalometry - standards
Craniology
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Face - pathology
Female
Hong Kong - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oropharynx
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Skull - pathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - ethnology - pathology
Abstract
Clinical detection of structural narrowing of the upper airway may facilitate early recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). To determine whether the craniofacial profile predicts the presence of OSA, the upper airway and craniofacial structure of 239 consecutive patients (164 Asian and 75 white subjects) referred to two sleep centres (Hong Kong and Vancouver) were prospectively examined for suspected sleep disordered breathing.
All subjects underwent a history and physical examination with measurements of anthropometric parameters and craniofacial structure including neck circumference, thyromental distance, thyromental angle, and Mallampati oropharyngeal score. OSA was defined as an apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of > or = 5/hour on full overnight polysomnography.
Discriminant function analysis indicated that the Mallampati score (F = 0.70), thyromental angle (F = 0.60), neck circumference (F = 0.54), body mass index (F = 0.53), and age (F = 0.53) were the best predictors of OSA. After controlling for ethnicity, body mass index and neck circumference, patients with OSA were older, had larger thyromental angles, and higher Mallampati scores than non-apnoeic subjects. These variables remained significantly different between OSA patients and controls across a range of cut-off values of AHI from 5 to 30/hour.
A crowded posterior oropharynx and a steep thyromental plane predict OSA across two different ethnic groups and varying degrees of obesity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15923252 View in PubMed
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Cultural differences in self- and other-evaluations and well-being: a study of European and Asian Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127498
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012 Apr;102(4):856-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Hyunji Kim
Ulrich Schimmack
Shigehiro Oishi
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga.
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012 Apr;102(4):856-73
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality - physiology
Personality Inventory
Self Concept
Self Report
Self-Assessment
Sexual Partners - psychology
Social Perception
Young Adult
Abstract
Anusic, Schimmack, Pinkus, and Lockwood (2009) developed the halo-alpha-beta (HAB) model to separate halo variance from variance due to valid personality traits and other sources of measurement error in self-ratings of personality. The authors used a twin-HAB model of self-ratings and ratings of a partner (friend or dating partner) to test several hypotheses about culture, evaluative biases in self- and other-perceptions, and well-being. Participants were friends or dating partners who reported on their own and their partner's personality and well-being (N = 906 students). European Canadians had higher general evaluative biases (GEB) than Asian Canadians. There were no cultural differences in self-enhancement or other-enhancement. GEB significantly predicted self-ratings of life satisfaction, but not informant ratings of well-being. GEB fully mediated the effect of culture on self-ratings of life satisfaction. The results suggest that North American culture encourages positive biases in self- and other-perceptions. These biases also influence self-ratings of life satisfaction but have a much weaker effect on informant ratings of life satisfaction. The implications of these findings for cultural differences in well-being are discussed.
PubMed ID
22288531 View in PubMed
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Culturally appropriate vegetables and economic development. A contextual analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125094
Source
Appetite. 2012 Aug;59(1):148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Bamidele Adekunle
Glen Filson
Sridharan Sethuratnam
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, 50 Stone Road East, University of Guelph, Canada N1G 2W1. badekunl@uoguelph.ca
Source
Appetite. 2012 Aug;59(1):148-54
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Crops, Agricultural - economics - supply & distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Economic development
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - ethnology
Questionnaires
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
This paper examines the implications of the demand for ethno-cultural vegetables (ECV) by South-Asians, the largest cultural group in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), on their potential for Ontario agricultural economic development and significant consumer health benefits. A conceptual framework is presented to explain the relationship among factors such as change in demographics, demand for locally produced ECV and both the potential agricultural and health benefits. Analysis of cross-sectional data collected in 2009 also indicates that the respondents have certain characteristics that are pertinent to understanding why they shop in particular stores and their perceptions about what constitutes quality. In sum, household size and percentage spent on vegetables predict their expenditure on ECV, an indication that South-Asians resident in the GTA will continue to demand their ECV. It is thus a niche market that farmers can explore if its potential economic value to them is clarified and the government can provide sufficient support by increasing awareness and creating appropriate economic incentives for farmers willing to grow these vegetables.
PubMed ID
22516843 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.