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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect experienced by aging chinese in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130694
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Daniel W L Lai
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. dlai@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elder Abuse - ethnology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Social Environment
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The traditional values of Chinese culture promote care and respect toward older adults. While it appears to be ironic to discuss issues of abuse and neglect in the Chinese culture, research findings in Chinese societies do indicate the occurrences of such problems. However, little research on the abuse and neglect of older Chinese in Western societies has been available. This study aims to examine the incidence of abuse and neglect and the associated correlates based on data collected from a random sample of 2,272 aging Chinese 55 years and older in seven Canadian cities. The findings show that 4.5% of the participants reported experiencing at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect within the past year. The most common forms of neglect and abuse experienced by the aging Chinese include being scolded, yelled at, treated impolitely all the time, and ridiculed. Close family members such as spouses and sons are those that most commonly maltreat older Chinese. Those who were more likely to report at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect were older adults living with others; they tended to have no education, more access barriers, more chronic illnesses, less favorable mental health, and a higher level of identification with Chinese cultural values. The findings implied that the face value of respect and care received by older people in Chinese culture should not be taken for granted. Culturally appropriate precautionary steps are needed for prevention and early problem identification.
PubMed ID
21978291 View in PubMed
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Adopting a child with cleft lip and palate: a study of parents' experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118377
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2013 Feb;47(1):30-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Emma Hansson
Jenny Ostman
Magnus Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. emma.hansson@med.lu.se
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2013 Feb;47(1):30-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adoption - ethnology - psychology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Cleft Lip - ethnology - surgery
Cleft Palate - ethnology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Emotions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Adoption of Chinese children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) has become increasingly more common in Sweden. The aim of this study was to examine parents' experience when adopting a child with CLP. Since 2008, 34 adopted children with CLP have been treated in our department. A questionnaire was sent to 33 of the families and 30 of them answered (91%). The parents had queued from 1 month to 8 years before they were offered a child. Eighteen families reported that they received information on CLP from the adoption agency and 87% contacted the department of plastic surgery for additional information. In 15 cases (45%) previously unknown medical conditions or birth defects other than CLP were discovered in Sweden. Most parents (67%) had been informed before the adoption that their child could be a carrier of resistant bacteria, but not all had received enough information to grasp what it implies to be a carrier. The great majority of the families did not feel that the early hospitalisation for the first operation had a negative impact on the attachment between them and their adopted child. They thought that the aesthetic and functional results of the operations were "better than expected". Seventeen families stated that people react to the cleft and four of them think that the reactions are a problem. Presumptive adoptive parents should be informed that the child might have unsuspected medical conditions, resistant bacteria, what carriage implies, and that needed treatment and long-term results are not predictable.
PubMed ID
23216342 View in PubMed
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Agency and facial emotion judgment in context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115479
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013 Jun;39(6):763-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Kenichi Ito
Takahiko Masuda
Liman Man Wai Li
Author Affiliation
Institute on Asian Consumer Insight, Singapore. kito@ntu.edu.sg
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2013 Jun;39(6):763-76
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Emotions
Environment
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Facial Expression
Humans
Judgment
Abstract
Past research showed that East Asians' belief in holism was expressed as their tendencies to include background facial emotions into the evaluation of target faces more than North Americans. However, this pattern can be interpreted as North Americans' tendency to downplay background facial emotions due to their conceptualization of facial emotion as volitional expression of internal states. Examining this alternative explanation, we investigated whether different types of contextual information produce varying degrees of effect on one's face evaluation across cultures. In three studies, European Canadians and East Asians rated the intensity of target facial emotions surrounded with either affectively salient landscape sceneries or background facial emotions. The results showed that, although affectively salient landscapes influenced the judgment of both cultural groups, only European Canadians downplayed the background facial emotions. The role of agency as differently conceptualized across cultures and multilayered systems of cultural meanings are discussed.
PubMed ID
23504599 View in PubMed
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Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) associated with GJB2 single mutation IVS1+1G>A in the Yakut population isolate in Eastern Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268546
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e100848
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nikolay A Barashkov
Fedor M Teryutin
Vera G Pshennikova
Aisen V Solovyev
Leonid A Klarov
Natalya A Solovyeva
Andrei A Kozhevnikov
Lena M Vasilyeva
Elvira E Fedotova
Maria V Pak
Sargylana N Lekhanova
Elena V Zakharova
Kyunney E Savvinova
Nyurgun N Gotovtsev
Adyum M Rafailo
Nikolay V Luginov
Anatoliy N Alexeev
Olga L Posukh
Lilya U Dzhemileva
Elza K Khusnutdinova
Sardana A Fedorova
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e100848
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Connexins - chemistry - genetics - physiology
DNA Mutational Analysis
Founder Effect
Hearing Loss - genetics
Humans
Mutation
Siberia
Abstract
Age-Related Hearing Impairment (ARHI) is one of the frequent sensory disorders registered in 50% of individuals over 80 years. ARHI is a multifactorial disorder due to environmental and poor-known genetic components. In this study, we present the data on age-related hearing impairment of 48 heterozygous carriers of mutation IVS1+1G>A (GJB2 gene) and 97 subjects with GJB2 genotype wt/wt in the Republic of Sakha/Yakutia (Eastern Siberia, Russia). This subarctic territory was found as the region with the most extensive accumulation of mutation IVS1+1G>A in the world as a result of founder effect in the unique Yakut population isolate. The GJB2 gene resequencing and detailed audiological analysis in the frequency range 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 kHz were performed in all examined subjects that allowed to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations between the presence of single mutation IVS1+1G>A and hearing of subjects from examined groups. We revealed the linear correlation between increase of average hearing thresholds at speech frequencies (PTA0.5,1.0,2.0,4.0 kHz) and age of individuals with GJB2 genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (rs?=?0.499, p?=?0.006860 for males and rs?=?0.427, p?=?0.000277 for females). Moreover, the average hearing thresholds on high frequency (8.0 kHz) in individuals with genotype IVS1+1G>A/wt (both sexes) were significantly worse than in individuals with genotype wt/wt (pA/wt was estimated to be ~40 years (rs?=?0.504, p?=?0.003). These findings demonstrate that the single IVS1+1G>A mutation (GJB2) is associated with age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) of the IVS1+1G>A carriers in the Yakuts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24959830 View in PubMed
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Aging, culture, and memory for socially meaningful item-context associations: an East-West cross-cultural comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114673
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60703
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lixia Yang
Juan Li
Julia Spaniol
Lynn Hasher
Andrea J Wilkinson
Jing Yu
Yanan Niu
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. lixiay@psych.ryerson.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60703
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology
Association Learning - physiology
Canada
Culture
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Memory - physiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Photic Stimulation
Social Identification
Abstract
Research suggests that people in Eastern interdependent cultures process information more holistically and attend more to contextual information than do people in Western independent cultures. The current study examined the effects of culture and age on memory for socially meaningful item-context associations in 71 Canadians of Western European descent (35 young and 36 older) and 72 native Chinese citizens (36 young and 36 older). All participants completed two blocks of context memory tasks. During encoding, participants rated pictures of familiar objects. In one block, objects were rated either for their meaningfulness in the independent living context or their typicality in daily life. In the other block, objects were rated for their meaningfulness in the context of fostering relationships with others or for their typicality in daily life. The encoding in each block was followed by a recognition test in which participants identified pictures and their associated contexts. The results showed that Chinese outperformed Canadians in context memory, though both culture groups showed similar age-related deficits in item and context memory. The results suggest that Chinese are at an advantage in memory for socially meaningful item-context associations, an advantage that continues from young adulthood into old age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23593288 View in PubMed
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Altered health status and quality of life in South Asians with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131706
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kevin R Bainey
Colleen M Norris
Milan Gupta
Danielle Southern
Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
Michelle M Graham
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
People of South Asian (SA) ancestry are susceptible to coronary artery disease (CAD). Although studies suggest that SA with CAD has a worse prognosis compared with Europeans, it is unknown whether corresponding differences in functional status and quality-of-life (QOL) measures exist. Accordingly, we compared symptoms, function, and QOL in SA and European Canadians with CAD using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ).
Using the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease, an outcomes registry that captures patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada, we identified 635 SA and 18,934 European patients with angiographic CAD from January 1995 to December 2006 who reported health status outcomes using the SAQ at 1 year after the index catheterization. To obtain comparable clinical variables among SA and Europeans, we used a propensity score-matching technique.
One-year adjusted mean (SD) scores were significantly lower in SA compared with European Canadians for most SAQ domains: exertional capacity (75 [23] vs 80 [23], P = .011), anginal stability (77 [28] vs 77 [27], P = .627), anginal frequency (86 [23] vs 88 [20], P
PubMed ID
21884867 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive medication adherence and mortality according to ethnicity: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256451
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Aug;30(8):925-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Qing Liu
Hude Quan
Guanmin Chen
Hong Qian
Nadia Khan
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Statistic, School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Aug;30(8):925-31
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Hemiplegia - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - ethnology - mortality
Income
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Paraplegia - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Few studies have evaluated adherence to antihypertensive medication in Chinese and South Asian populations and little is known about the long-term outcome. Our objectives were to compare adherence to antihypertensive medications and assess the association of adherence and long-term mortality in Chinese, South Asian, and white patients with newly diagnosed hypertension.
We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with hypertension who were new users of antihypertensive medications (1997-2005) using administrative data and a province-wide prescription database from British Columbia, Canada. Antihypertensive medication adherence within 1 year from the date of the first antihypertensive drug prescription was assessed using the 'proportion of days covered' metric. Proportion of days covered = 80% indicated optimal adherence. Patients were followed for up to 10 years for mortality.
There were 16,471 (11.1%) Chinese, 6099 (4.1%) South Asian, and 126,081 (84.8%) white patients who were prescribed antihypertensive medications. Compared with white patients, Chinese (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.72) and South Asian patients (odds ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.40) were less likely to be optimally adherent to antihypertensive medications. Optimal adherence was associated with reduced mortality in white patients (risk-adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.89; 95% CI, 0.85-0.93) but not associated with mortality in Chinese (aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.83-1.17) and South Asian patients (aHR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.84-1.44).
Chinese and South Asian patients with newly diagnosed hypertension were significantly less likely to adhere to antihypertensive medications than their white counterparts. However, optimal adherence in Chinese and South Asian patients was not associated with mortality.
PubMed ID
25064583 View in PubMed
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Asian ethnicity and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritic total knee arthroplasty population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152119
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2010 Apr;25(3):416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Rajiv Gandhi
Fahad Razak
Peggy Tso
J Roderick Davey
Nizar N Mahomed
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2010 Apr;25(3):416-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - surgery
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA). We asked whether the prevalence of MS varies across ethnicity among patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for end-stage OA. In our population of 1460 patients undergoing primary knee arthroplasty, MS was defined as body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Among the 1334 white patients, 114 (8.5%) had MS as compared with 3 of 36 (8.3%) blacks and 18 of 90 (20%) Asians (P = .006) Adjusted analysis showed that those of Asian ethnicity had a 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.8; P = .03) times greater odds of MS as compared with those of other ethnicity. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for OA, and Asians demonstrate a greater prevalence of MS as compared with whites and blacks in this population.
PubMed ID
19278817 View in PubMed
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205 records – page 1 of 21.