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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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ABH secretion polymorphism in Icelanders, Aland Islanders, Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi and Greenland Eskimos: a review and new data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237022
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1986 May-Jun;13(3):273-85
Publication Type
Article
Author
A W Eriksson
K. Partanen
R R Frants
J C Pronk
P J Kostense
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1986 May-Jun;13(3):273-85
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland
Greenland
Humans
Iceland
Inuits
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Saliva - immunology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The secretion of the ABH antigens in saliva was tested in indigenous individuals of several populations: Icelanders in Reykjavik and Husavik (northeastern Iceland), Aland Islanders, Finno-Ugrians (Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi) and Eskimos (Augpilagtok, northwestern Greenland). The frequencies of ABH non-secretors among the Icelanders (28-36%) were among the highest ever noted in Europeans. Among Alanders and Swedes on the Finnish mainland the frequency (around 20%) was comparable to Swedish values but considerably higher than among Finns (13-14%). The values among northeastern Finns and Komi (about 9%) were intermediate between values among Lapps (below 5%) and Scandinavians (15-26%), excluding Icelanders (28-41%). The average frequency of non-secretors among Lapps in Finland (2.2 +/- 0.5%) was the lowest observed among white populations. Like many other arctic populations of the Mongolian race, the Greenland Eskimos had a very low frequency of non-secretors. It is probable that the non-secretor allele ABH*se was absent from the ancient Lapps and Greenland Eskimos but introduced by invading populations. It is concluded that the ABH*se allele frequencies vary much more among northern European populations than hitherto appreciated. Recent studies indicate that the non-secretor status of the ABH blood group substances in mucous body fluids is associated with pathological conditions of the mucous membranes of the embryologically related digestive and respiratory systems, particularly with duodenal ulcer and gastric (pre)malignancies but probably also with pulmonary dysfunction. In view of these disadvantages of the ABH non-secretor status the high frequency of ABH*se in Icelanders is a paradoxical phenomenon. The frequency of ABH non-secretors among the founders (Vikings) of Iceland may have been considerably higher than among the present populations in northwestern Europe. The increase in northwestern direction of the ABH*se allele frequencies supports this hypothesis; the dilution effect has not been as strong in Iceland as on the European continent.
PubMed ID
3752918 View in PubMed
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Absence of the atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme in Saskatchewan Cree Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221601
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
L E Dyck
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - physiopathology
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - genetics
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Flushing - etiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Frequency
Hair - enzymology
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Isoelectric Focusing
Isoenzymes - genetics
Mitochondria - enzymology
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Skin Tests
Abstract
Three methods were employed to assess whether human volunteers (Caucasian, Asian or Cree Indian) possessed the typical or atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme. These methods were: (1) questioning individuals about facial flushing responses following alcohol consumption; (2) application of the ethanol skin patch test, and (3) direct analysis using isoelectric focusing and activity staining of ALDH activity in hair root samples. The results from the three methods were in good agreement and revealed that only the typical ALDH2 isozyme was expressed in Saskatchewan Cree Indians. In agreement with previous reports, the typical ALDH2 was expressed in the Caucasian group of subjects, while both the typical and atypical forms were expressed in the Asian subjects.
PubMed ID
8359813 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect experienced by aging chinese in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130694
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Daniel W L Lai
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. dlai@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elder Abuse - ethnology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Social Environment
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The traditional values of Chinese culture promote care and respect toward older adults. While it appears to be ironic to discuss issues of abuse and neglect in the Chinese culture, research findings in Chinese societies do indicate the occurrences of such problems. However, little research on the abuse and neglect of older Chinese in Western societies has been available. This study aims to examine the incidence of abuse and neglect and the associated correlates based on data collected from a random sample of 2,272 aging Chinese 55 years and older in seven Canadian cities. The findings show that 4.5% of the participants reported experiencing at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect within the past year. The most common forms of neglect and abuse experienced by the aging Chinese include being scolded, yelled at, treated impolitely all the time, and ridiculed. Close family members such as spouses and sons are those that most commonly maltreat older Chinese. Those who were more likely to report at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect were older adults living with others; they tended to have no education, more access barriers, more chronic illnesses, less favorable mental health, and a higher level of identification with Chinese cultural values. The findings implied that the face value of respect and care received by older people in Chinese culture should not be taken for granted. Culturally appropriate precautionary steps are needed for prevention and early problem identification.
PubMed ID
21978291 View in PubMed
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Access to cardiac rehabilitation among South-Asian patients by referral method: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143716
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Keerat Grewal
Yvonne W Leung
Parissa Safai
Donna E Stewart
Sonia Anand
Milan Gupta
Cynthia Parsons
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, ON. keerat.grewal@utoronto.ca
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - ethnology - rehabilitation
Asia, Western - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Automation
Continuity of Patient Care
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
People of South-Asian origin have an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is effective, South Asians are among the least likely people to participate in these programs. Automatic referral increases CR use and may reduce access inequalities. This study qualitatively explored whether CR referral knowledge and access varied among South-Asian patients. Participants were South-Asian cardiac patients receiving treatment at hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Each hospital refers to CR via one offour methods: automatically through paper or electronically, through discussion with allied health professionals (liaison referral), or through referral at the physician's discretion. Data were collected via interviews and analyzed using interpretive-descriptive analysis. Four themes emerged: the importance of predischarge CR discussions with healthcare providers, limited knowledge of CR, ease of the referral process for facilitators of CR attendance, and participants'needs for personal autonomy regarding their decision to attend CR. Liaison referral was perceived to be the most suitable referral method for participants. It facilitated communication between patients and providers, ensuring improved understanding of CR. Automatic referral may not be as well suited to this population because of reduced patient-provider communication.
PubMed ID
20450019 View in PubMed
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Active tuberculosis in Indochinese refugees in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240335
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Jul 1;131(1):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1984
Author
D A Enarson
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Jul 1;131(1):39-42
Date
Jul-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Refugees
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of active tuberculosis in 8692 Indochinese refugees admitted to British Columbia between 1979 and 1981 was reviewed. In the first 3 months after entry into the province the rate was extremely high--estimated at 1890/100 000 (126 times the provincial average). A large proportion of these cases were of primary or minimal pulmonary tuberculosis. However, although the proportion of cases of minimal pulmonary tuberculosis was twice the provincial average, the proportion of these cases that were confirmed by culture was only one third the provincial average; this suggests some overdiagnosis in this period. In the subsequent 21 months of residence the incidence of active tuberculosis was also high, at 353/100 000, which was more than 20 times the provincial average. The distribution of cases by severity was closer to the provincial distribution in this period, but advanced disease accounted for a far smaller proportion of cases in both periods than it did in 1980 in the entire province.
Notes
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Jan;119(1):11-8420429
Cites: Eur J Respir Dis. 1980 Jun;61(3):139-427439278
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Mar 18;249(11):1455-606827722
PubMed ID
6733647 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory tract infections and mannose-binding lectin insufficiency during early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6751
Source
JAMA. 2001 Mar 14;285(10):1316-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2001
Author
A. Koch
M. Melbye
P. Sørensen
P. Homøe
H O Madsen
K. Mølbak
C H Hansen
L H Andersen
G W Hahn
P. Garred
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. ako@ssi.dk
Source
JAMA. 2001 Mar 14;285(10):1316-21
Date
Mar-14-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Carrier Proteins - blood - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genotype
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Inuits - genetics
Male
Mannose-Binding Lectins
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hospital-based studies have found that increased susceptibility to certain infections is associated with low serum levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) due to MBL variant alleles. However, the contribution of MBL insufficiency to incidence of common childhood infections at a population level is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of MBL insufficiency on risk for acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in unselected children younger than 2 years. DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based, prospective, cohort study conducted in Sisimiut, Greenland. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred fifty-two children younger than 2 years who were followed up weekly between August 1996 and August 1998 for morbidity surveillance. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Risk of ARI, based on medical history and clinical examination, compared by MBL genotype, determined from blood samples based on presence of structural and promoter alleles. RESULTS: A 2.08-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-3.06) increased relative risk (RR) of ARI was found in MBL-insufficient children (n = 13) compared with MBL-sufficient children (n = 239; P
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2001 Mar 14;285(10):1348-911255392
PubMed ID
11255386 View in PubMed
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[Adaptive changes in the microcirculation of the conjunctival blood vessels in different Chukchi tribes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5435
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 1984 Nov-Dec;(6):58-60
Publication Type
Article

Additive effects of the major risk alleles of IRF5 and STAT4 in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90739
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Nordmark G.
Kristjansdottir G.
Theander E.
Eriksson P.
Brun J G
Wang C.
Padyukov L.
Truedsson L.
Alm G.
Eloranta M-L
Jonsson R.
Rönnblom L.
Syvänen A-C
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnel.Nordmark@medsci.uu.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Interferon Regulatory Factors - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Risk factors
STAT4 Transcription Factor - genetics - immunology
Sjogren's Syndrome - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Primary Sj?gren's syndrome (SS) shares many features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we investigated the association of the three major polymorphisms in IRF5 and STAT4 found to be associated with SLE, in patients from Sweden and Norway with primary SS. These polymorphisms are a 5-bp CGGGG indel in the promoter of IRF5, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10488631 downstream of IRF5 and the STAT4 SNP rs7582694, which tags the major risk haplotype of STAT4. We observed strong signals for association between all three polymorphisms and primary SS, with odds ratios (ORs) >1.4 and P-values
PubMed ID
19092842 View in PubMed
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613 records – page 1 of 62.