Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Acculturation and sexual function in Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171478
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Lori A Brotto
Heather M Chik
Andrew G Ryder
Boris B Gorzalka
Brooke N Seal
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gyneacology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Lori.Brotto@vch.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2005 Dec;34(6):613-26
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Cultural effects on sexuality are pervasive and potentially of great clinical importance, but have not yet received sustained empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of acculturation on sexual permissiveness and sexual function, with a particular focus on arousal in Asian women living in Canada. We also compared questionnaire responses between Asian and Euro-Canadian groups in hopes of investigating whether acculturation captured unique information not predicted by ethnic group affiliation. Euro-Canadian (n = 173) and Asian (n = 176) female university students completed a battery of questionnaires in private. Euro-Canadian women had significantly more sexual knowledge and experiences, more liberal attitudes, and higher rates of desire, arousal, sexual receptivity, and sexual pleasure. Anxiety from anticipated sexual activity was significantly higher in Asian women, but the groups did not differ significantly on relationship satisfaction or problems with sexual function. Acculturation to Western culture, as well as maintained affiliation with traditional Asian heritage, were both significantly and independently related to sexual attitudes above and beyond length of residency in Canada, and beyond ethnic group comparisons. Overall, these data suggest that measurement of acculturation may capture information about an individual's unique acculturation pattern that is not evident when focusing solely on ethnic group comparisons or length of residency, and that such findings may be important in facilitating the assessment, classification, and treatment of sexual difficulties in Asian women.
PubMed ID
16362246 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beliefs related to breast health practices: the perceptions of South Asian women living in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202909
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Dec;47(12):2075-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
J L Bottorff
J L Johnson
R. Bhagat
S. Grewal
L G Balneaves
H. Clarke
B A Hilton
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Dec;47(12):2075-85
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Asian Americans - psychology
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Culture
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Mammography - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Abstract
Breast cancer is becoming a major concern for many South Asian women. Clinical observations of women from a South Asian community living in Canada revealed an under use of early detection strategies. The purpose of this qualitative ethnoscience study was to examine breast health practices from the perspective of South Asian women to provide a foundation for the development of culturally suitable breast health services for this group. Open-ended interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 50 South Asian women over the age of 30 who had not been diagnosed with breast cancer. Adequate representation of the main religious groups (i.e. Sikh, Hindu, Muslim and Christian) was ensured through sampling techniques. Analysis of translated interviews involved identification of themes and the development of a taxonomy to represent relationships among emerging cultural themes and domains. Four central domains of beliefs related to breast health practices were identified: beliefs about a woman's calling, beliefs about cancer, beliefs about taking care of your breasts and beliefs about accessing services. These beliefs hold important implications for how health promotion strategies should be structured and offered, In particular, attention must be paid to the language that is used to talk about breast cancer, the importance of the role of the family in women's health decisions and traditions related to using narratives to share information and advice.
PubMed ID
10075248 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ethnic and cultural determinants of the perceptions of female dental students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244234
Source
J Dent Educ. 1981 Sep;45(9):576-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
M L Mesa
M. Clark
G. Austin
M. Barden
Source
J Dent Educ. 1981 Sep;45(9):576-80
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans - psychology
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude
Canada - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Ethnic Groups - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Motivation
Self Concept
Students, Dental - psychology
United States - ethnology
Women - psychology
Abstract
A survey of women dental students enrolled in all American and Canadian dental schools during the 1977-78 academic year was conducted to determine their backgrounds, current status, motivation regarding dentistry as a career, perception of the dental school environment, preferences in dental education, and future plans. The data were analyzed on the basis of ethnic or racial derivation to delineate differences in the perceptions of female dental students of various ethnic groups. Recognizing the nature of such differences may prove beneficial to dental educators, who must determine the specific problems faced by female students of various ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
6943175 View in PubMed
Less detail

Meaning making in middle childhood: an exploration of the meaning of ethnic identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125198
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2012 Apr;18(2):99-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Leoandra Onnie Rogers
Kristina M Zosuls
May Ling Halim
Diane Ruble
Diane Hughes
Andrew Fuligni
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA. orogers@nyu.edu
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2012 Apr;18(2):99-108
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - psychology
Age Factors
Asian Americans - psychology
Child
Child Psychology
Dominican Republic - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
New York City
Russia - ethnology
Social Identification
Abstract
Social identity, including identification with one's ethnic group, is an important aspect of social development. However, little is known about the subjective meaning associated with social group memberships, particularly during middle childhood. Using second- and fourth-graders responses to an open-ended question, we explored the meaning of ethnic identity with a sample of Chinese, Dominican, Russian, White, and Black American children. Analyses revealed that middle childhood is an active period for meaning making as children described the ethnic identity to include ideas such as language, physical appearance, pride, relative social position, and culture. While there were few differences in the ethnic identity meaning responses of second- and fourth-grade children, the meaning of ethnic identity varied considerably across the ethnic groups underscoring how the unique features and experiences of different ethnic groups shapes the subjective meaning of ethnic identity. These findings align with prior research on the meaning of ethnic identity among adults and adolescents and offer insight for future research regarding the conceptualization and measurement of the meaning of social group membership.
PubMed ID
22506814 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mental health issues for Asian Americans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201782
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1999 Jun;50(6):774-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
K M Lin
F. Cheung
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Research Center on the Psychobiology of Ethnicity, Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance 90502, USA. linkeh@harbor2.humc.edu
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1999 Jun;50(6):774-80
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health
Complementary Therapies
Culture
Family - psychology
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychotherapy
Somatoform Disorders - ethnology
Terminology as Topic
United States
Abstract
One of fastest-growing population groups in recent decades, Asian Americans represent a vastly diversified and rich mixture of cultures, languages, beliefs, and practices, many of which differ widely from those of European Americans. As immigrants, Asian Americans have experienced and continue to experience various emotional and behavioral problems. However, they tend to underuse existing services except those that are culturally appropriate and linguistically compatible. Misdiagnosis frequently occurs, and the existence of culture-bound syndromes points to a lack of precise correspondence between indigenous labels and established diagnostic categories. Due to Asian traditions of viewing the body and mind as unitary rather than dualistic, patients tend to focus more on physical discomforts than emotional symptoms, leading to an overrepresentation of somatic complaints. Traditional practices and healing methods are frequently used to alleviate distress both before and after patients and their family members approach the conventional mental health care system. Help seeking typically is a family venture. Asian patients respond well to highly structured therapeutic interventions such as those used in behavioral, cognitive, and interpersonal models. When applying pharmacotherapy, clinicians should pay attention to Asians' unique responses to psychotropics, especially in regard to dosage requirements and side effects. Research in this area as well as on other important issues is in the early stage of development.
PubMed ID
10375146 View in PubMed
Less detail

Overt and subtle racial discrimination and mental health: preliminary findings for Korean immigrants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163263
Source
Am J Public Health. 2007 Jul;97(7):1269-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Samuel Noh
Violet Kaspar
K A S Wickrama
Author Affiliation
Culture, Community and Health Studies Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. samuel_noh@camh.net
Source
Am J Public Health. 2007 Jul;97(7):1269-74
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Asian Americans - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Korea - ethnology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Mental health
Ontario - epidemiology
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Abstract
We examined differential effects of overt and subtle forms of racial discrimination on 2 dimensions of mental health-positive affect and depressive symptoms, and explored the mediating roles of emotional arousal and cognitive appraisal.
Cross-sectional survey data were collected through face-to-face interviews with a sample (N=180) of adult Korean immigrants living in Toronto, Ontario. Maximum likelihood estimates of path coefficients were obtained using structural equation models.
Perceived racial discrimination was associated with both the erosion of positive affect and depressive symptoms. Overt discrimination was associated with the erosion of positive affect, and subtle discrimination was associated with depressive symptoms. Effects of subtle discrimination on depressive symptoms were mediated through cognitive appraisal.
The results emphasize the salience of subtle discrimination for the mental health of Asian immigrants. Experiences of overt racial bias seemed to be of little importance for the levels of depressive symptoms among those in our sample, although the experience of blatant discrimination tended to reduce positive mood.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 May;94(5):809-1415117705
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Feb;93(2):232-812554575
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 1992 Sep;180(9):573-71522406
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1999 Sep;40(3):193-20710513144
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Dec;94(12):2118-2415569963
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Dec;94(12):2125-3115569964
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Feb;95(2):238-4015671457
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):496-50115727983
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Oct;61(7):1576-9616005789
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Jun;43(2):143-5112096696
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Jun;43(2):207-2212096700
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Jun;43(2):236-4612096702
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Feb;93(2):194-912554569
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 Feb;93(2):200-812554570
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 1989 Mar;177(3):121-312918295
PubMed ID
17538066 View in PubMed
Less detail

The phenomenon of somatization among community Chinese Americans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177064
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Dec;39(12):967-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Winnie W S Mak
Nolan W S Zane
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N. T. Hong Kong. wwsmak@psy.cuhk.edu.hk
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Dec;39(12):967-74
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Asian Americans - psychology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Female
Humans
Los Angeles
Male
Middle Aged
Social Support
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
The phenomenon of somatization was explored in relation to the experiences of acculturation, stress, support, and distress.
A representative community sample of 1,747 Chinese Americans (aged 18-65 years), selected by a multi-stage household sampling design, in the Los Angeles County was interviewed to tap their psychiatric diagnoses, symptomatology, level of acculturation, stress, and support.
Across all indices, Chinese Americans' level of somatic symptoms, impairment related to somatization, and percentage of meeting the Somatic Symptom Index 5/5 (SSI 5/5) criterion were comparable to those found in other populations. Length of residence in the U. S. and acculturation were not related to somatization. Regression analyses showed that anxiety, depression, gender, age, education, stressors, and support were significantly related to somatization, ps
PubMed ID
15583904 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predictors of clinical breast examination among South Asian immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179134
Source
J Immigr Health. 2004 Jul;6(3):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Farah Ahmad
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Program, University Health Network, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. farah.ahmad@uhn.on.ca
Source
J Immigr Health. 2004 Jul;6(3):119-26
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Breast Self-Examination - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Communication Barriers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Prevention - standards
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Women's health
Abstract
To determine predictors of clinical breast examination (CBE) among South Asian immigrant women residing in Toronto, Canada. A cross-sectional self-administered survey with women patients visiting family physician group practices. Fifty-four women participated in the study (response rate 77%). Twenty women (38.5%) "ever had" CBE. Compared to women who never had CBE, women who had CBE were statistically older, had lived more years in Canada, had better knowledge of breast cancer, had lower perceived barriers to CBE, and were more likely to have ever had a periodic health exam. No significant differences were found between the two groups for education, employment, English language abilities, perceived health, and perceived benefits of CBE. A direct logistic regression with five predictor variables, significant at a univariate level, was statistically reliable, chi(2) (5, n=51) = 34.7, p
PubMed ID
15269515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychosocial predictors of diet and acculturation in Chinese American and Chinese Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189371
Source
Ethn Health. 2002 Feb;7(1):21-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Jessie Satia-Abouta
Ruth E Patterson
Alan R Kristal
Chong Teh
Shin-Ping Tu
Author Affiliation
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Cancer Prevention Research Program, Seattle, USA. jabouta@unc.edu
Source
Ethn Health. 2002 Feb;7(1):21-39
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Social Class
Washington
Abstract
To examine the influence of diet-related psychosocial constructs on the dietary practices of Chinese populations living in North America.
Data are from a cross-sectional survey of 244 women of Chinese ethnicity living in Seattle, WA, USA and Vancouver, BC, Canada. Using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and PRECEDE/PROCEED as our model, we collected information on diet-related psychosocial (predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing) factors; consumption of foods reflecting Western and Chinese dietary practices; and past and current consumption of fruits, vegetables and fat.
Participants generally believed that there were strong relationships between diet and health, but only about a quarter were aware of nutrition information from the government. Food cost, availability, and convenience did not appear to be major concerns among these participants. Respondents' older relatives and spouses tended to prefer a Chinese diet and also had a strong influence on the household diet. Associations of the psychosocial factors with demographic characteristics, adoption of Western dietary practices, and consumption of fruits and vegetables were informative. For example, older, less educated respondents considered it very important to eat a low fat, high fruit and vegetable diet; while younger, more educated participants who were employed outside the home did not think the Chinese diet is healthier than a typical Western diet (all p
PubMed ID
12119064 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.