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211 records – page 1 of 22.

Absence of the atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme in Saskatchewan Cree Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221601
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
L E Dyck
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - physiopathology
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - genetics
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Flushing - etiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Frequency
Hair - enzymology
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Isoelectric Focusing
Isoenzymes - genetics
Mitochondria - enzymology
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Skin Tests
Abstract
Three methods were employed to assess whether human volunteers (Caucasian, Asian or Cree Indian) possessed the typical or atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme. These methods were: (1) questioning individuals about facial flushing responses following alcohol consumption; (2) application of the ethanol skin patch test, and (3) direct analysis using isoelectric focusing and activity staining of ALDH activity in hair root samples. The results from the three methods were in good agreement and revealed that only the typical ALDH2 isozyme was expressed in Saskatchewan Cree Indians. In agreement with previous reports, the typical ALDH2 was expressed in the Caucasian group of subjects, while both the typical and atypical forms were expressed in the Asian subjects.
PubMed ID
8359813 View in PubMed
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Access to healthcare and alternative health-seeking strategies among undocumented migrants in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132993
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:560
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Dan Biswas
Maria Kristiansen
Allan Krasnik
Marie Norredam
Author Affiliation
Danish Research Centre for Migration, Ethnicity and Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark. dabi@sund.ku.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:560
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Denmark
Emergency Nursing
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Transients and Migrants
Young Adult
Abstract
As in many European countries, undocumented migrants in Denmark have restricted access to healthcare. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse undocumented migrants' experiences of access to healthcare, use of alternative health-seeking strategies; and ER nurses' experiences in encounters with undocumented migrants.
Qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and observations. The participants included ten undocumented South Asian migrants and eight ER nurses.
Undocumented migrants reported difficulties accessing healthcare. The barriers to healthcare were: limited medical rights, arbitrariness in healthcare professionals' attitudes, fear of being reported to the police, poor language skills, lack of network with Danish citizens, lack of knowledge about the healthcare system and lack of knowledge about informal networks of healthcare professionals. These barriers induced alternative health-seeking strategies, such as self-medication, contacting doctors in home countries and borrowing health insurance cards from Danish citizens. ER nurses expressed willingness to treat all patients regardless of their migratory status, but also reported challenges in the encounters with undocumented migrants. The challenges for ER nurses were: language barriers, issues of false identification, insecurities about the correct standard procedures and not always being able to provide appropriate care.
Undocumented migrants face formal and informal barriers to the Danish healthcare system, which lead to alternative health-seeking strategies that may have adverse effects on their health. This study shows the need for policies and guidelines, which in accordance with international human rights law, ensure access to healthcare for undocumented migrants and give clarity to healthcare professionals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21752296 View in PubMed
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Acculturation status and hypertension among Asian immigrants in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190204
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Jun;56(6):455-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002

Accuracy of actuarial procedures for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk may vary across ethnicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30268
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):107-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Niklas Långström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 23000, S-104 35 Stockholm, Sweden. niklas.langstrom@cns.ki.se
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):107-20
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Analysis of Variance
Asia - ethnology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence - prevention & control
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about whether the accuracy of tools for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk holds across ethnic minority offenders. I investigated the predictive validity across ethnicity for the RRASOR and the Static-99 actuarial risk assessment procedures in a national cohort of all adult male sex offenders released from prison in Sweden 1993-1997. Subjects ordered out of Sweden upon release from prison were excluded and remaining subjects (N = 1303) divided into three subgroups based on citizenship. Eighty-three percent of the subjects were of Nordic ethnicity, and non-Nordic citizens were either of non-Nordic European (n = 49, hereafter called European) or African Asian descent (n = 128). The two tools were equally accurate among Nordic and European sexual offenders for the prediction of any sexual and any violent nonsexual recidivism. In contrast, neither measure could differentiate African Asian sexual or violent recidivists from nonrecidivists. Compared to European offenders, AfricanAsian offenders had more often sexually victimized a nonrelative or stranger, had higher Static-99 scores, were younger, more often single, and more often homeless. The results require replication, but suggest that the promising predictive validity seen with some risk assessment tools may not generalize across offender ethnicity or migration status. More speculatively, different risk factors or causal chains might be involved in the development or persistence of offending among minority or immigrant sexual abusers.
PubMed ID
15208896 View in PubMed
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[Adoption of foreign children in Denmark. Health conditions in 83 families. I. Adopted children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40409
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Jul 5;144(27):2033-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-5-1982

Advances in the dental search for Native American origins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241352
Source
Acta Anthropogenet. 1984;8(1-2):23-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
C G Turner
Source
Acta Anthropogenet. 1984;8(1-2):23-78
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Anthropology, Physical
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Biological Evolution
Humans
Indians, North American
Indians, South American
Paleodontology
Population Dynamics
Tooth - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The Sinodont dental morphology pattern of NE Asia is today more complex and was so by 20,000 years ago, than the simplified Sundadonty of SE Asia-Oceania, and the very simplified pattern that evolved greater than 20,000 B.P. All Native Americans are Sinodonts. Intra--and inter-hemispheric statistical analyses of 28 dental traits in greater than 6000 N & S American and greater than 1100 NE Asian crania reveal three temporally stable American sub-patterns, suggesting prior evolution in Sino-Siberia. The hypothesized biocultural associations and migration episodes are: (1) "Upper Cave" Sinodonts with the generalized Chinese Microlithic Tradition reach the Arctic steppe via the Lena basin to become Paleo--and most later Indians. (2) Smaller-game-hunting Siberian Diuktaians cross to Alaska at forest-forming terminal land bridge times to become Paleo-Arctic and subsequent Na-Dene-speaking NW forest Indians. (3) Lower Amur basin-N Japan blade-makingfolk evolve a coastal culture on the way to the land bridge's SE terminus at Anangula-Umnak where the oldest skeletons of the dentally distinctive but variable Aleut-Eskimos have been found.
PubMed ID
6085675 View in PubMed
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Age at onset of multiple sclerosis may be influenced by place of residence during childhood rather than ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170585
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Kennedy
P. O'Connor
A D Sadovnick
M. Perara
I. Yee
B. Banwell
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. L5M 4A7, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) most commonly affects individuals of Northern European descent who live in countries at high latitude. The relative contributions of ancestry, country of birth and residence as determinants of MS risk have been studied in adult MS, but have not been explored in the pediatric MS population. In this study, we compare the demographics of pediatric- and adult-onset MS patients cared for in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, a multicultural region. The country of birth, residence during childhood, and ancestry were compared for 44 children and 573 adults. Our results demonstrate that although both the pediatric and adult cohorts were essentially born and raised in the same region of Ontario, Canada, children with MS were more likely to report Caribbean, Asian or Middle Eastern ancestry, and were less likely to have European heritage compared with individuals with adult-onset MS. The difference in ancestry between the pediatric and adult MS cohorts can be explained by two hypotheses: (1) individuals raised in a region of high MS prevalence, but whose ancestors originate from regions in which MS is rare, have an earlier age of MS onset, and (2) the place of residence during childhood, irrespective of ancestry, determines lifetime MS risk -- a fact that will be reflected in a change in the demographics of the adult MS cohort in our region as Canadian-raised children of recent immigrants reach the typical age of adult-onset MS.
PubMed ID
16493204 View in PubMed
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[Age determination by teeth in suspected misinformation about the age of adopted children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40143
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Apr 27;80(17):1810-2, 17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1983

American Indian prehistory as written in the mitochondrial DNA: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223740
Source
Hum Biol. 1992 Jun;64(3):403-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
D C Wallace
A. Torroni
Author Affiliation
Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322.
Source
Hum Biol. 1992 Jun;64(3):403-16
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia - ethnology
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Emigration and Immigration - history
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Variation
Haplotypes - genetics
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, Central American - genetics - history
Indians, North American - genetics - history
Indians, South American - genetics - history
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Abstract
Native Americans have been divided into three linguistic groups: the reasonably well-defined Eskaleut and Nadene of northern North America and the highly heterogeneous Amerind of North, Central, and South America. The heterogeneity of the Amerinds has been proposed to be the result of either multiple independent migrations or a single ancient migration with extensive in situ radiation. To investigate the origin and interrelationship of the American Indians, we examined the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in 87 Amerinds (Pima, Maya, and Ticuna of North, Central, and South America, respectively), 80 Nadene (Dogrib and Tlingit of northwest North America and Navajo of the southwest North America), and 153 Asians from 7 diverse populations. American Indian mtDNAs were found to be directly descended from five founding Asian mtDNAs and to cluster into four lineages, each characterized by a different rare Asian mtDNA marker. Lineage A is defined by a HaeIII site gain at np 663, lineage B by a 9-bp deletion between the COII and tRNA(Lys) genes, lineage C by a HincII site loss at np 13259, and lineage D by an AluI site loss at np 5176. The North, Central, and South America Amerinds were found to harbor all four lineages, demonstrating that the Amerinds originated from a common ancestral genetic stock. The genetic variation of three of the four Amerind lineages (A, C, and D) was similar with a mean value of 0.084%, whereas the sequence variation in the fourth lineage (B) was much lower, raising the possibility of an independent arrival. By contrast, the Nadene mtDNAs were predominantly from lineage A, with 27% of them having a Nadene-specific RsaI site loss at np 16329. The accumulated Nadene variation was only 0.021%. These results demonstrate that the Amerind mtDNAs arose from one or maybe two Asian migrations that were distinct from the migration of the Nadene and that the Amerind populations are about four times older than the Nadene.
Notes
Comment In: Hum Biol. 1992 Jun;64(3):271-91607180
PubMed ID
1351474 View in PubMed
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Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203013
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Mar;64(3):817-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
T M Karafet
S L Zegura
O. Posukh
L. Osipova
A. Bergen
J. Long
D. Goldman
W. Klitz
S. Harihara
P. de Knijff
V. Wiebe
R C Griffiths
A R Templeton
M F Hammer
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Evolution, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Mar;64(3):817-31
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Founder Effect
Gene Frequency
Genetics, Population
Haplotypes
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Linguistics
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Genetic
Population Dynamics
Y Chromosome - genetics
Abstract
Haplotypes constructed from Y-chromosome markers were used to trace the origins of Native Americans. Our sample consisted of 2,198 males from 60 global populations, including 19 Native American and 15 indigenous North Asian groups. A set of 12 biallelic polymorphisms gave rise to 14 unique Y-chromosome haplotypes that were unevenly distributed among the populations. Combining multiallelic variation at two Y-linked microsatellites (DYS19 and DXYS156Y) with the unique haplotypes results in a total of 95 combination haplotypes. Contra previous findings based on Y- chromosome data, our new results suggest the possibility of more than one Native American paternal founder haplotype. We postulate that, of the nine unique haplotypes found in Native Americans, haplotypes 1C and 1F are the best candidates for major New World founder haplotypes, whereas haplotypes 1B, 1I, and 1U may either be founder haplotypes and/or have arrived in the New World via recent admixture. Two of the other four haplotypes (YAP+ haplotypes 4 and 5) are probably present because of post-Columbian admixture, whereas haplotype 1G may have originated in the New World, and the Old World source of the final New World haplotype (1D) remains unresolved. The contrasting distribution patterns of the two major candidate founder haplotypes in Asia and the New World, as well as the results of a nested cladistic analysis, suggest the possibility of more than one paternal migration from the general region of Lake Baikal to the Americas.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10053017 View in PubMed
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211 records – page 1 of 22.