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Access to cardiac rehabilitation among South-Asian patients by referral method: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143716
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Keerat Grewal
Yvonne W Leung
Parissa Safai
Donna E Stewart
Sonia Anand
Milan Gupta
Cynthia Parsons
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, ON. keerat.grewal@utoronto.ca
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - ethnology - rehabilitation
Asia, Western - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Automation
Continuity of Patient Care
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
People of South-Asian origin have an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is effective, South Asians are among the least likely people to participate in these programs. Automatic referral increases CR use and may reduce access inequalities. This study qualitatively explored whether CR referral knowledge and access varied among South-Asian patients. Participants were South-Asian cardiac patients receiving treatment at hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Each hospital refers to CR via one offour methods: automatically through paper or electronically, through discussion with allied health professionals (liaison referral), or through referral at the physician's discretion. Data were collected via interviews and analyzed using interpretive-descriptive analysis. Four themes emerged: the importance of predischarge CR discussions with healthcare providers, limited knowledge of CR, ease of the referral process for facilitators of CR attendance, and participants'needs for personal autonomy regarding their decision to attend CR. Liaison referral was perceived to be the most suitable referral method for participants. It facilitated communication between patients and providers, ensuring improved understanding of CR. Automatic referral may not be as well suited to this population because of reduced patient-provider communication.
PubMed ID
20450019 View in PubMed
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Forensic medical examination of refugees who claim to have been tortured.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74891
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2005 Jun;26(2):125-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Peter Mygind Leth
Jytte Banner
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. pleth@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2005 Jun;26(2):125-30
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia, Western - ethnology
Cicatrix - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Ecchymosis - pathology
Foot Injuries - pathology
Forensic Medicine
Hematoma - pathology
Humans
Joints - injuries
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology
Peripheral Nerves - injuries
Physical Examination
Prisoners - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Skin - injuries - pathology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Tooth Injuries - pathology
Torture - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Walking - physiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
The United Nations Convention against torture prohibits repatriation of refugees if there is reason to believe they will be tortured on return to their country. A history of torture is therefore an important factor in making a case for asylum. In this study, the results of the medical examinations of 59 torture victims investigated at the Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark, 1996-2002, are presented and discussed. Variables including age, sex, education, health, torture methods, condition of confinement, torture aftereffects, and findings at the forensic examination were registered in a database (Paradox) and analyzed. In 70%, aftereffects of torture could be documented. These included scars after fixation, burns, incisions, or flogging. Symptoms and signs from joints, muscles, and nerves were common in victims who had been suspended. Many of the victims of phalanga had painful feet and signs of walking impairment. A majority of the victims suffered from posttraumatic stress syndrome. An independent medical report offers an opportunity to evaluate and elaborate the story told by the victim and should be used in disputed cases. We have a duty to protect refugees against torture.
PubMed ID
15894844 View in PubMed
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Housing and living arrangements of Western Asian immigrant seniors in Edmonton, Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159052
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(3):185-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Cheuk Fan Ng
Herbert C Northcott
Sharon McIrvin Abu-Laban
Author Affiliation
Centre for Psychology, Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB. cheukn@athabascau.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2007;26(3):185-94
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Asia, Western - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Housing for the Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Humans
India - ethnology
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian population is aging and becoming more ethnically diverse. This paper focuses on South Asian immigrant seniors and examines differences in housing and living arrangements among seniors who immigrated at different life stages. We interviewed a convenience sample of 161 immigrant seniors of South Asian descent in Edmonton, Alberta, to assess type of living arrangement, type of housing and dwelling density (measured in persons per room), activity in the neighbourhood, and means of transportation. Overall, those seniors who came to Canada before the end of mid-life were more likely than those who came at an older age to drive a car and, if married, to live in a one- or two-generation family. Women were more likely than men to be widowed, have poorer English-language skills, or live with a three-generation family if unmarried, and less likely to drive a car. Most respondents were satisfied with their living arrangements, housing, and perceived safety at home and in their neighbourhood. Theoretical implications are discussed.
PubMed ID
18238725 View in PubMed
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Indo-Canadian beliefs regarding organ donation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172258
Source
Prog Transplant. 2005 Sep;15(3):233-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Anita E Molzahn
Rosalie Starzomski
Michael McDonald
Chloe O'Loughlin
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Prog Transplant. 2005 Sep;15(3):233-9
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia, Western - ethnology
Attitude to Death - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Decision Making
Emigration and Immigration
Family - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Social Values
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Waiting Lists
Abstract
There is concern that a disproportionately high number of people of South Asian origin await transplantation in Canada. The donation rate is low in this population, and it is difficult to obtain good tissue matches.
To explore the values and beliefs regarding organ donation among Indo-Canadian people living in British Columbia.
A naturalistic qualitative study was designed. Individual interviews and focus groups were held to collect data pertaining to beliefs regarding organ donation.
Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada.
A total of 40 Indo-Canadian persons participated; a wide range of ages, religions, and backgrounds were represented.
The major themes that emerged from the data related to context (including family/community, religion, trust in the healthcare system, and knowledge about organ donation); and values and beliefs (including intergenerational considerations, death and dying, and the organ donation process). Participants noted that people from their community were reluctant to discuss death and relatedissues such as organ donation. Although there was recognition of the importance of individual decision making pertaining to organ donation, the participants believed that family and community members also should be involved.
Beliefs varied considerably among participants, and one should not make assumptions about the beliefs of any one individual based primarily on that individual's membership in an ethnocultural community.
PubMed ID
16252629 View in PubMed
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The influence of family on immigrant South Asian women's health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171942
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2005 Aug;11(3):242-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Sukhdev Grewal
Joan L Bottorff
B Ann Hilton
Author Affiliation
Langara College, Canada. sgrewal@langara.bc.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2005 Aug;11(3):242-63
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia, Western - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
British Columbia
Culture
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Social Support
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Women's health
Work
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of family members on immigrant South Asian women's health and health-seeking behavior. This qualitative study was part of a larger study that examined the health-seeking practices of immigrant South Asian women living in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. Using ethnographic methods, data were collected through face-to-face interviews with women who had lived in Canada for 10 months to 31 years. Analysis of translated and transcribed data revealed that women made decisions about their health in consultation with family members. Overall, family members were perceived to be supportive and provided direct and indirect assistance to women in ways that influenced their health. Expected roles and responsibilities often had detrimental influences on women's health. Health care for immigrant South Asian women needs to take into account women's relationships with family members and the influence of family on women's health.
PubMed ID
16287827 View in PubMed
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Othering and being othered in the context of health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180509
Source
Health Commun. 2004;16(2):255-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Joy L Johnson
Joan L Bottorff
Annette J Browne
Sukhdev Grewal
B Ann Hilton
Heather Clarke
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Canada. johnson@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Health Commun. 2004;16(2):255-71
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa, Eastern - ethnology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia, Western - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - classification - ethnology
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
British Columbia
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Fiji - ethnology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prejudice
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Identification
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Othering is a process that identifies those that are thought to be different from oneself or the mainstream, and it can reinforce and reproduce positions of domination and subordination. Although there are theoretical and conceptual treatments of othering in the literature, researchers lack sufficient examples of othering practices that influence the interactions between patients and health care providers. The purpose of this study was to explore the interactions between health care providers and South Asian immigrant women to describe othering practices and their effects. Ethnographic methods were used involving in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. The analysis entailed identifying uses of othering and exploring the dynamics through which this process took place. Women shared stories of how discriminatory treatment was experienced. The interviews with health care professionals provided examples of how views of South Asian women shaped the way health care services were provided. Three forms of othering were found in informants' descriptions of their problematic health care encounters: essentializing explanations, culturalist explanations, and racializing explanations. Women's stories illustrated ways of coping and managing othering experiences. The analysis also revealed how individual interactions are influenced by the social and institutional contexts that create conditions for othering practices. To foster safe and effective health care interactions, those in power must continue to unmask othering practices and transform health care environments to support truly equitable health care.
PubMed ID
15090288 View in PubMed
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South Asian migrant women and HIV/STIs: knowledge, attitudes and practices and the role of sexual power.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148596
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jan;16(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Anita J Gagnon
Lisa Merry
Jacqueline Bocking
Ellen Rosenberg
Jacqueline Oxman-Martinez
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, and Women's Health Mission, McGill University Health Centre, 3506 University Street, Montréal, Canada. anita.gagnon@mcgill.ca
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jan;16(1):10-5
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Asia, Western - ethnology
Decision Making
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Power (Psychology)
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control - transmission
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
Differences in relationship power dynamics or migration factors may affect knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in resettling Migrant women. A sample of 122 women and men born in India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan or Bangladesh and residing in Montreal completed questionnaires on HIV/STI KAP and decision-making power Within sexual relationships. Knowledge gaps and stigmatizing attitudes were found. STI/HIV information available in one's language and other educational strategies that consider women's Power may improve KAP among South Asian migrant women.
PubMed ID
19747873 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.