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[4 new species of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Central Asia, Siberia and the Far East]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50863
Source
Parazitologiia. 2000 May-Jun;34(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Iankovskii
Source
Parazitologiia. 2000 May-Jun;34(3):241-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asia, Central
English Abstract
Female
Larva - anatomy & histology - classification
Male
Nymph - anatomy & histology - classification
Pupa - anatomy & histology - classification
Siberia
Simuliidae - anatomy & histology - classification
Abstract
Four new species of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) are described. Helodon rezidentsii Yankovsky, sp. n., Khabarovsk Territory, differs from all known species of the genus with morphology of eyes consisting only of microommatidii in male; from related species H. kamtshaticus (Rubzov, 1940) with large triangular posteromedial lobes of branches of genital fork in female; with number of rays of primary fan of premandibles (20-22, when in H. kamtshaticus 30-32) in larva. Helodon submulticaulis Yankovsky, sp. n., Transbaikalia, differs from related species H. multicaulis (Popov, 1968) with number of rays of primary fan of mandibles (36-40, when in H. multicaulis 26-28), narrow anterior branches of anal sclerite, number of rows of hooks in posterior attachment organ (88-92, when in H. multicaulis 78-80) in larva; with morphology of respiratory organ, consisting of 5-8 lobes bearing 40-60 tune filaments (in H. multicaulis 3-4 lobes bearing more than 150 filaments) in pupa. Sch. samarkandica Yankovsky, sp. n., Uzbekistan, differs from related species Sch. pseudopusilla Rubzov, 1956 with 3 (not 2 as in Sch. pseudopusilla) hooks in parameres, bifurcated lateral branches of X sternite, long projection of gonostyles in male. Schoenbaueria ivdelensis Yankovsky, sp. n., Middle Ural, differs from related species Sch. rangiferina (Rubzov, 1956) with prolonged gonostyles bearing narrow projection in male; with number of rays of secondary fan of premandibles (20-28, when in Sch. rangiferina 44-48), deep ventral groove of cephalic capsule, number of rows of hooks in posterior attachment organ (80-82, when in Sch. rangiferina 70-72) in larva; with morphology of respiratory organ (very long stems of 2 and 3 pairs of filaments) in pupa.
PubMed ID
10920845 View in PubMed
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The 1999 National Caring Awards. Young adult awardees--Craig Kielburger, Concord, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198759
Source
Caring. 1999 Dec;18(12):36-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999

Absence of the Asian-specific region V mitochondrial marker in Native Beringians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224068
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
G F Shields
K. Hecker
M I Voevoda
J K Reed
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Asia, Central - ethnology
Base Sequence
Chromosome Deletion
DNA Probes - diagnostic use
DNA, Mitochondrial - analysis - genetics
Far East - ethnology
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
The Asian-specific 9-bp deletion between the genes for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II and lysine transfer RNA has been used to trace aboriginal human movements out of Southeast Asia and into portions of the South Pacific. Although it has been used to estimate the number of independent lineages that occur in the New World, it has not been studied in native peoples of the Beringian region. Thus, we have used PCR to amplify and compare the lengths of DNA segments surrounding this deletion in native peoples of Beringia and the adjacent regions, as well as natives of the Altai Mountains of Southwestern Siberia. Of the 176 individuals analyzed here, the deletion was found in only 3 of 25 individuals from the Ust-Kan region of the Altai Mountains. We comment on the distribution of this marker and on potential relationships between Beringians and other Native American groups in which this marker has been surveyed. One Chukchi possessed three copies of the 9-bp sequence, which suggests (1) that the number of copies of this sequence in humans may be more variable than had been believed and (2) that a mechanism of replication based on tandem duplication may be a potential explanation for the origin of this length mutation in humans.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1550120 View in PubMed
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Absence of the atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme in Saskatchewan Cree Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221601
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
L E Dyck
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - physiopathology
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - genetics
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Flushing - etiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Frequency
Hair - enzymology
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Isoelectric Focusing
Isoenzymes - genetics
Mitochondria - enzymology
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Skin Tests
Abstract
Three methods were employed to assess whether human volunteers (Caucasian, Asian or Cree Indian) possessed the typical or atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme. These methods were: (1) questioning individuals about facial flushing responses following alcohol consumption; (2) application of the ethanol skin patch test, and (3) direct analysis using isoelectric focusing and activity staining of ALDH activity in hair root samples. The results from the three methods were in good agreement and revealed that only the typical ALDH2 isozyme was expressed in Saskatchewan Cree Indians. In agreement with previous reports, the typical ALDH2 was expressed in the Caucasian group of subjects, while both the typical and atypical forms were expressed in the Asian subjects.
PubMed ID
8359813 View in PubMed
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Abstract profiles of structural stability point to universal tendencies, family-specific factors, and ancient connections between languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120224
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dan Dediu
Stephen C Levinson
Author Affiliation
Language and Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Dan.Dediu@mpi.nl
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Asia
Australia
Bayes Theorem
Cultural Evolution - history
Europe
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Language - history
Linguistics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the "stability profiles" of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world.
Notes
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Erratum In: PLoS One.2012;7(10). doi: 10.1371/annotation/ceff8775-a4e3-45cb-b6c9-dd62d9179d59
PubMed ID
23028843 View in PubMed
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Access and coverage of needle and syringe programmes (NSP) in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84779
Source
Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Aceijas Carmen
Hickman Matthew
Donoghoe Martin C
Burrows Dave
Stuikyte Raminta
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Drugs and Health Behaviour (CRDHB), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Department of Public Health and Policy, London, UK.
Source
Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1244-50
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia, Central - epidemiology
Demography
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hepatitis C - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Needle-Exchange Programs - economics - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate access, activity and coverage of needle and syringe programmes (NSP) in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. METHODS: Two data sets ('regional' and 'high-coverage sites') were used to estimate NSP provision (availability/number of sites), NSP utilization (syringes distributed/year), needle and syringe distribution (needles/syringes distributed/IDU/year), IDU reached (number/percentage of IDU contacted/year), regular reach (five or more contacts/month) and syringe coverage (percentage of injections/IDU/year administrable with new injecting equipment). RESULTS: Regional data set: results from 213 sites in 25 countries suggested that Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and Ukraine had > 10 NSP during 2001/2. Czech Republic, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Russia, Slovakia and Ukraine had >or= 10,000 IDU in contact with NSP. Ten countries reached >or= 10% of the estimated IDU population. The 25 countries distributed approximately 17 million syringes/needles. Eight countries distributed > 0.5 million syringes/year. Syringe coverage (assuming 400 injections/IDU/year) was 15% in Macedonia. Overall syringe coverage was 1.2% and when assuming 700 injections/IDU/year it decreased to 0.7%. Syringe coverage for the IDU population in contact with NSP was 60% in Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova and Tajikistan. Overall syringe coverage for the population in contact with NSP was 9.8%. High-coverage data set: Soligorsk, Pskov and Sumy's NSP reached 92.3%, 92.2% and 73.3% of their estimated IDU population, respectively (regular reach: 0.2%, 1.8% and 22.7%). The distribution levels were 47.2, 51.7 and 94.2 syringes/IDU/year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The evidence suggests suboptimal levels of NSP implementation, programme activity and coverage. This paper provides a baseline for development of indicators that could be used to monitor NSP. Strategies to increase coverage that may go beyond NSP are urgently required, as is research into understanding how NSP can contribute to better syringe coverage among IDU.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2007 Aug;102(8):1179-8017624968
PubMed ID
17565564 View in PubMed
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Access to cardiac rehabilitation among South-Asian patients by referral method: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143716
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Keerat Grewal
Yvonne W Leung
Parissa Safai
Donna E Stewart
Sonia Anand
Milan Gupta
Cynthia Parsons
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, ON. keerat.grewal@utoronto.ca
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;35(3):106-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - ethnology - rehabilitation
Asia, Western - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Automation
Continuity of Patient Care
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
People of South-Asian origin have an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is effective, South Asians are among the least likely people to participate in these programs. Automatic referral increases CR use and may reduce access inequalities. This study qualitatively explored whether CR referral knowledge and access varied among South-Asian patients. Participants were South-Asian cardiac patients receiving treatment at hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Each hospital refers to CR via one offour methods: automatically through paper or electronically, through discussion with allied health professionals (liaison referral), or through referral at the physician's discretion. Data were collected via interviews and analyzed using interpretive-descriptive analysis. Four themes emerged: the importance of predischarge CR discussions with healthcare providers, limited knowledge of CR, ease of the referral process for facilitators of CR attendance, and participants'needs for personal autonomy regarding their decision to attend CR. Liaison referral was perceived to be the most suitable referral method for participants. It facilitated communication between patients and providers, ensuring improved understanding of CR. Automatic referral may not be as well suited to this population because of reduced patient-provider communication.
PubMed ID
20450019 View in PubMed
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Access to healthcare and alternative health-seeking strategies among undocumented migrants in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132993
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:560
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Dan Biswas
Maria Kristiansen
Allan Krasnik
Marie Norredam
Author Affiliation
Danish Research Centre for Migration, Ethnicity and Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark. dabi@sund.ku.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:560
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Denmark
Emergency Nursing
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Transients and Migrants
Young Adult
Abstract
As in many European countries, undocumented migrants in Denmark have restricted access to healthcare. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse undocumented migrants' experiences of access to healthcare, use of alternative health-seeking strategies; and ER nurses' experiences in encounters with undocumented migrants.
Qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and observations. The participants included ten undocumented South Asian migrants and eight ER nurses.
Undocumented migrants reported difficulties accessing healthcare. The barriers to healthcare were: limited medical rights, arbitrariness in healthcare professionals' attitudes, fear of being reported to the police, poor language skills, lack of network with Danish citizens, lack of knowledge about the healthcare system and lack of knowledge about informal networks of healthcare professionals. These barriers induced alternative health-seeking strategies, such as self-medication, contacting doctors in home countries and borrowing health insurance cards from Danish citizens. ER nurses expressed willingness to treat all patients regardless of their migratory status, but also reported challenges in the encounters with undocumented migrants. The challenges for ER nurses were: language barriers, issues of false identification, insecurities about the correct standard procedures and not always being able to provide appropriate care.
Undocumented migrants face formal and informal barriers to the Danish healthcare system, which lead to alternative health-seeking strategies that may have adverse effects on their health. This study shows the need for policies and guidelines, which in accordance with international human rights law, ensure access to healthcare for undocumented migrants and give clarity to healthcare professionals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21752296 View in PubMed
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Acculturation status and hypertension among Asian immigrants in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190204
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Jun;56(6):455-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002

Accuracy of actuarial procedures for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk may vary across ethnicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30268
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):107-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Niklas Långström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 23000, S-104 35 Stockholm, Sweden. niklas.langstrom@cns.ki.se
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Apr;16(2):107-20
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Analysis of Variance
Asia - ethnology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence - prevention & control
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about whether the accuracy of tools for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk holds across ethnic minority offenders. I investigated the predictive validity across ethnicity for the RRASOR and the Static-99 actuarial risk assessment procedures in a national cohort of all adult male sex offenders released from prison in Sweden 1993-1997. Subjects ordered out of Sweden upon release from prison were excluded and remaining subjects (N = 1303) divided into three subgroups based on citizenship. Eighty-three percent of the subjects were of Nordic ethnicity, and non-Nordic citizens were either of non-Nordic European (n = 49, hereafter called European) or African Asian descent (n = 128). The two tools were equally accurate among Nordic and European sexual offenders for the prediction of any sexual and any violent nonsexual recidivism. In contrast, neither measure could differentiate African Asian sexual or violent recidivists from nonrecidivists. Compared to European offenders, AfricanAsian offenders had more often sexually victimized a nonrelative or stranger, had higher Static-99 scores, were younger, more often single, and more often homeless. The results require replication, but suggest that the promising predictive validity seen with some risk assessment tools may not generalize across offender ethnicity or migration status. More speculatively, different risk factors or causal chains might be involved in the development or persistence of offending among minority or immigrant sexual abusers.
PubMed ID
15208896 View in PubMed
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595 records – page 1 of 60.