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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: mortality 1976-88.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219707
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
J C McDonald
F D Liddell
A. Dufresne
A D McDonald
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Serpentine
Asbestosis - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of some 11,000 men born 1891-1920 and employed for at least one month in the chrysotile mines and mills of Quebec, was established in 1966 and has been followed ever since. Of the 5351 men surviving into 1976, only 16 could not be traced; 2508 were still alive in 1989, and 2827 had died; by the end of 1992 a further 698 were known to have died, giving an overall mortality of almost 80%. This paper presents the results of analysis of mortality for the period 1976 to 1988 inclusive, obtained by the subject-years method, with Quebec mortality for reference. In many respects the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) 20 years or more after first employment were similar to those for the period 1951-75--namely, all causes 1.07 (1951-75, 1.09); heart disease 1.02 (1.04); cerebrovascular disease 1.06 (1.07); external causes 1.17 (1.17). The SMR for lung cancer, however, rose from 1.25 to 1.39 and deaths from mesothelioma increased from eight (10 before review) to 25; deaths from respiratory tuberculosis fell from 57 to five. Among men whose exposure by age 55 was at least 300 million particles per cubic foot x years (mpcf.y), the SMR (all causes) was elevated in the two main mining regions, Asbestos and Thetford Mines, and for the small factory in Asbestos; so were the SMRs for lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and respiratory disease other than pneumoconiosis. Except for lung cancer, however, there was little convincing evidence of gradients over four classes of exposure, divided at 30, 100, and 300 mpcf.y. Over seven narrower categories of exposure up to 300 mpcf.y the SMR for lung cancer fluctuated around 1.27 with no indication of trend, but increased steeply above that level. Mortality form pneumoconiosis was strongly related to exposure, and the trend for mesothelioma was not dissimilar. Mortality generally was related systematically to cigarette smoking habit, recorded in life from 99% of survivors into 1976; smokers of 20 or more cigarettes a day had the highest SMRs not only for lung cancer but also for all causes, cancer of the stomach, pancreas, and larynx, and ischaemic heart disease. For lung cancer SMRs increased fivefold with smoking, but the increase with dust exposure was comparatively slight for non-smokers, lower again for ex-smokers, and negligible for smokers of at least 20 cigarettes a day; thus the asbestos-smoking interaction was less than multiplicative. Of the 33 deaths from mesothelioma in the cohort to date, 28 were in miners and millers and five were in employees of a small asbestos products factory where commercial amphiboles had also been used. Preliminary analysis also suggest that the risk of mesothelioma was higher in the mines and mills at Thetford Mines than in those at Asbestos. More detailed studies of these differences and of exposure-response relations for lung cancer are under way.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 Feb;37(1):11-247370189
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1982 Jan;45(1):124-357059455
Cites: Biometrics. 1983 Mar;39(1):173-846871346
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Jun;44(6):396-4013606968
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1979;330:91-116294225
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1992 Aug;49(8):566-751325180
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1971 Jun;22(6):677-865574010
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1972 Mar;24(3):189-975059627
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1991 Aug;48(8):543-71878311
PubMed ID
8280638 View in PubMed
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Absence of radiographic asbestosis and the risk of lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers: Extended follow-up of a cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141822
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Nov;53(11):1065-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Murray M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Nov;53(11):1065-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - toxicity
Asbestosis - mortality - radiography
Canada - epidemiology
Construction Materials - toxicity
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Risk
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
It has been a matter of controversy whether there is an increased risk of lung cancer among asbestos-exposed workers without radiographic asbestosis. A previous study of lung cancer risk among asbestos-cement workers has been updated with an additional 12 years of follow-up.
Subjects had received radiographic examination at 20 and 25 years from first exposure to asbestos. Radiographs were interpreted by a single National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified B-reader using the 1971 International Labor Office (ILO) Classification of the pneumoconioses as reference standard. Asbestosis was defined as an ILO coding of 1/0 or higher. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated using the general population of Ontario as reference.
Among asbestos-cement workers without radiographic asbestosis at 20 years latency the lung cancer SMR was 3.84 (2.24-6.14). Among workers without asbestosis when examined at 25 years latency the SMR was 3.69 (1.59-7.26).
Workers from an Ontario asbestos-cement factory who did not have radiographic asbestosis at 20 or 25 years from first exposure to asbestos continued to have an increased risk of death from lung cancer during an additional 12 years of follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Jun;54(6):495-6; author reply 497-821328422
PubMed ID
20672325 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative survey of radiologic abnormalities of workers in chrysotile asbestos, talc and non-mineral products industries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251482
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc. 1976;51(1 Pt 2):621-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976

[All mesothelioma cases in cancer registries are going to be studied]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27908
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Dec 3;72(49):4818
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-1975
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Dec 3;72(49):4818
Date
Dec-3-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos
Mesothelioma - chemically induced
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Occupational Medicine
Registries
Sweden
PubMed ID
1195924 View in PubMed
Less detail

Almost half of women with malignant mesothelioma were exposed to asbestos at home through their husbands or sons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262972
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Maja Dahl Langhoff
Maren Brøndberg Kragh-Thomsen
Sharleny Stanislaus
Ulla Møller Weinreich
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4902
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Pleural Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Spouses
Survival Rate
Abstract
Women often develop malignant mesothelioma (MM) without occupational asbestos exposure. Northern Jutland has a high prevalence of MM due to previously high occupational exposures to asbestos. The aim of this study was to elucidate a possible domestic exposure to asbestos through first-degree relatives in women who develop MM.
This was a retrospective study in women with MM of the pleura. A total of 30 women were diagnosed with and treated for MM in Northern Jutland from 1996 to 2012. In all, 24 women were included. Demographic data, subtype of MM, time from first hospital contact to diagnosis, survival and information on occupational and domestic exposure to asbestos were obtained from hospital records.
A total of 12.5% of the study population were primarily exposed to asbestos. 46% had domestic exposure to asbestos through their husbands or sons. The median age of the study population was 66.5 years. In all, 75% suffered from the epitheloid subtype, 12.5% from the biphasic and 8.4% from the sarcomatoid subtype. Time from first hospital contact to diagnosis was one month and the median survival time was 12 months. The 1- and 5- year-survival were 58% and 0%, respectively.
Nearly 50% of the women affected by MM have been domestically exposed to asbestos through first-degree relatives.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25186542 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambient air concentration of asbestos fibres, dust content and mortality: the case of Asbestos, Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242395
Source
Ecol Dis. 1983;2(4):343-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
B. Singh
J P Thouez
Source
Ecol Dis. 1983;2(4):343-51
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Asbestos - adverse effects - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec
Risk
Abstract
Ambient air concentrations of asbestos fibres were measured during the period 20 June to 12 August, 1980 at three locations; Danville, Asbestos and Wottenville in the eastern townships of Quebec. Measurements were made with low-volume samplers and measurement periods ranged from 3 to 13 days. Fibre counts were made by means of electron microscopy. Our results indicate that overall fibre concentrations are related to atmospheric stability and to the direction of the prevailing wind with respect to the source of emission. Fibre concentrations are then related to total dust content of the ambient air for the town of Asbestos. Spatial variations of mortality are in turn related to the variations in the concentration of ambient air dust particles.
PubMed ID
6681164 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of mortality patterns and workers' compensation awards among asbestos insulation workers in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231845
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Service, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(5):523-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Humans
Insurance Claim Review
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Ontario
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
Mortality and workers' compensation patterns were studied among 1,064 Ontario asbestos insulation workers. A proportional mortality analysis of 153 asbestos worker deaths found increased mortality from malignant diseases (65 deaths observed; 35.1 expected), cancers of the lungs and pleura (32 deaths observed; 11.5 expected), peritoneal mesothelioma (4 deaths), and respiratory diseases (14 deaths observed; 7.9 expected). Despite the publicity given to asbestos-associated diseases, dependents of many men potentially eligible for workers compensation awards have not received pensions because claims were not filed. These findings suggest that much occupationally related disease is not being recognized in Ontario.
PubMed ID
2531545 View in PubMed
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457 records – page 1 of 46.