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183 records – page 1 of 19.

"886-84-like" tick-borne encephalitis virus strains: Intraspecific status elucidated by comparative genomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310363
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2019 08; 10(5):1168-1172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2019
Author
Renat V Adelshin
Elena A Sidorova
Artem N Bondaryuk
Anna G Trukhina
Dmitry Yu Sherbakov
Richard Allen White Iii
Evgeny I Andaev
Sergey V Balakhonov
Author Affiliation
Irkutsk Anti-Plague Research Institute of Siberia and Far East, Trilisser 78, 664047, Irkutsk, Russia; Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk, Russia. Electronic address: adelshin@gmail.com.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2019 08; 10(5):1168-1172
Date
08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - classification - genetics
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Genome, Viral
Genomics
Genotype
Incidence
Ixodes - virology
Rodent Diseases - epidemiology - virology
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) can cause severe meningitis, encephalitis, and meningoencephalitis. TBEV represents a pathogen of high zoonotic potential and an emerging global threat. There are three known subtypes of TBEV: Far-Eastern, Siberian and European. Since 2001 there have been suggestions that two new subtypes may be distinguished: "178-79" and "886-84". These assumptions are based on the results of the envelope gene fragment sequencing (Zlobin et al., 2001; Kovalev and Mukhacheva, 2017) and genotype-specific probes molecular hybridization (Demina et al., 2010). There is only one full-genome sequence of "178-79" strain and two identical ones of "886-84" strain can be found in GenBank. For clarification of the intraspecific position of the "886-84-like" strains group we completely sequenced six previously unknown "886-84-like" strains isolated in Eastern Siberia. As a result of applying different bioinformatics approaches, we can confirm that "886-84-like" strains group is a distinct subtype of TBEV.
PubMed ID
31253516 View in PubMed
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[A case of the tick (Ixodidae) hiperinvasion of the tundra vole in magadan environs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289887
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):45-50
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Author
N E Dokuchaev
Source
Parazitologiia. 2017 Jan-Feb; 51(1):45-50
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - parasitology
Fatal Outcome
Ixodes - pathogenicity - physiology
Male
Siberia
Tick Infestations - parasitology - pathology
Tundra
Abstract
A case of tundra vole death as a result its hyperinvasion by ticks Ixodes angustus on the northern periphery of the Asiatic range of the parasite is given.
PubMed ID
29401575 View in PubMed
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[A case of tularemia infection on Wrangel Island].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235630
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987
Author
R A Savel'eva
I S Meshcheriakova
L S Kamennova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Date
Feb-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Arvicolinae
Disease Vectors
Humans
Male
Siberia
Tularemia - pathology - transmission
PubMed ID
3554848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of 137Cesium and 90Strontium from abiotic and biotic sources in rodents at Chornobyl, Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61733
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2001 Sep;20(9):1927-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
R K Chesser
B E Rodgers
J K Wickliffe
S. Gaschak
I. Chizhevsky
C J Phillips
R J Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens 30602, USA. rchesser@ttu.edu
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2001 Sep;20(9):1927-35
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Animals
Animals, Wild
Arvicolinae
Cesium radioisotopes - pharmacokinetics
Diet
Environmental monitoring
Female
Male
Mice
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - pharmacokinetics
Strontium Radioisotopes - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Trees
Ukraine
Abstract
Bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and laboratory strains of house mice (Mus musculus BALB and C57BL) were relocated into enclosures in a highly contaminated area of the Red Forest near the Chornobyl (Ukraine) Reactor 4 to evaluate the uptake rates of 137Cs and 90Sr from abiotic sources. Mice were provided with uncontaminated food supplies, ensuring that uptake of radionuclides was through soil ingestion, inhalation, or water. Mice were sampled before introduction and were reanalyzed every 10 d for 137Cs uptake. Levels of 90Sr were assessed in subsamples from the native populations and in experimental animals at the termination of the study. Uptake rates in house mice were greater than those in voles for both 137Cs and 90Sr. Daily uptake rates in house mice were estimated at 2.72 x 10(12) unstable atoms per gram (whole body) for 137Cs and 4.04 x 10(10) unstable atoms per gram for 90Sr. Comparable rates in voles were 2.26 x 10(11) unstable atoms per gram for 137Cs and 1.94 x 10(10) unstable atoms per gram for 90Sr. By comparing values from voles in the enclosures to those from wild voles caught within 50 m of the enclosures, it was estimated that only 8.5% of 137Cs was incorporated from abiotic sources, leaving 91.5% being incorporated by uptake from biotic materials. The fraction of 90Sr uptake from abiotic sources was at least 66.7% (and was probably much higher). Accumulated whole-body doses during the enclosure periods were estimated as 174 mGy from intramuscular 137Cs and 68 mGy by skeletal 90Sr in house mice over 40 d and 98 mGy from 137Cs and 19 mGy from 90Sr in voles over 30 d. Thus, uptake of radionuclides from abiotic materials in the Red Forest at Chornobyl is an important source of internal contamination.
PubMed ID
11521818 View in PubMed
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[Activation of natural tularemia foci of the field-meadow and steppe types on the territory of Tula Province 1977-1978].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243441
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Mar;(3):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
Z A Levacheva
A G Lobkovskii
V V Tikhonenko
M A Belova
M P Dolotova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Mar;(3):36-40
Date
Mar-1982
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthropod Vectors
Arvicolinae - microbiology
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Geography
Humans
Rural Population
Russia
Ticks - microbiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Urban Population
Abstract
Natural tularemia foci of the meadow and steppe type are extremely stable and become active in those years when the most favourable living conditions for rodents appear. For the first time during the last 30 years a great increase in the number of common voles, accompanied by widely spread epizooty covering the whole territory of the Tula region, was observed. House mice, common field mice, harvest mice and black rats were also involved in this epizooty and 235 tularemia patients with all clinical forms of the disease were registered, the pulmonary form of the disease being prevalent. The cases of the disease were observed among both urban and rural population. In spite of a high morbidity rate, no cases of group infection were registered in domestic conditions and among agricultural workers due to the existence of the numerous immune layer among the population. The formation of this layer resulted from planned vaccinal prophylaxis covering, on the average, 86.3% of the rural population of the region.
PubMed ID
6211008 View in PubMed
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Adler hantavirus, a new genetic variant of Tula virus identified in Major's pine voles (Microtus majori) sampled in southern European Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265932
Source
Infect Genet Evol. 2015 Jan;29:156-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Evgeniy A Tkachenko
Peter T Witkowski
Lukas Radosa
Tamara K Dzagurova
Nataliya M Okulova
Yulia V Yunicheva
Ludmila Vasilenko
Vyacheslav G Morozov
Gennadiy A Malkin
Detlev H Krüger
Boris Klempa
Source
Infect Genet Evol. 2015 Jan;29:156-63
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - classification - virology
Black Sea
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Evolution, Molecular
Genetic Variation
Hantavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Phylogeny
Phylogeography
RNA, Viral - analysis
Russia
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Abstract
Although at least 30 novel hantaviruses have been recently discovered in novel hosts such as shrews, moles and even bats, hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) are primarily known as rodent-borne human pathogens. Here we report on identification of a novel hantavirus variant associated with a rodent host, Major's pine vole (Microtus majori). Altogether 36 hantavirus PCR-positive Major's pine voles were identified in the Krasnodar region of southern European Russia within the years 2008-2011. Initial partial L-segment sequence analysis revealed novel hantavirus sequences. Moreover, we found a single common vole (Microtusarvalis) infected with Tula virus (TULV). Complete S- and M-segment coding sequences were determined from 11 Major's pine voles originating from 8 trapping sites and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The data obtained show that Major's pine vole is a newly recognized hantavirus reservoir host. The newfound virus, provisionally called Adler hantavirus (ADLV), is closely related to TULV. Based on amino acid differences to TULV (5.6-8.2% for nucleocapsid protein, 9.4-9.5% for glycoprotein precursor) we propose to consider ADLV as a genotype of TULV. Occurrence of ADLV and TULV in the same region suggests that ADLV is not only a geographical variant of TULV but a host-specific genotype. High intra-cluster nucleotide sequence variability (up to 18%) and geographic clustering indicate long-term presence of the virus in this region.
PubMed ID
25433134 View in PubMed
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Age and sex differences in numerical responses, dietary shifts, and total responses of a generalist predator to population dynamics of main prey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307084
Source
Oecologia. 2020 Mar; 192(3):699-711
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Giulia Masoero
Toni Laaksonen
Chiara Morosinotto
Erkki Korpimäki
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20014, Turku, Finland. giulia.masoero@gmail.com.
Source
Oecologia. 2020 Mar; 192(3):699-711
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Female
Finland
Horses
Male
Population Dynamics
Predatory Behavior
Strigiformes
Abstract
Fluctuations in the abundance of main prey species might shape animal communities, by inducing numerical responses and dietary shifts in predators. Whether numerical responses and dietary shifts differ among individuals of different age and sex has so far gained little attention. These differences could affect how much predators consume main and alternative prey, thus causing variation in predation pressure on main and alternative prey species. We studied the effect of fluctuating main prey abundance (voles) in autumn on the age and sex composition of a food-hoarding population of Eurasian pygmy owls Glaucidium passerinum (327 individuals), and on the species composition of their food stores in western Finland during 2003-2017 (629 food stores). Numbers of yearlings (
Notes
ErratumIn: Oecologia. 2021 Feb;195(2):557-558 PMID 33387009
PubMed ID
32008080 View in PubMed
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Age-related effects of chronic hantavirus infection on female host fecundity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273935
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2015 Sep;84(5):1264-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Eva R Kallio
Heikki Helle
Esa Koskela
Tapio Mappes
Olli Vapalahti
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2015 Sep;84(5):1264-72
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Arvicolinae
Female
Fertility
Finland
Hantavirus Infections - physiopathology - veterinary
Puumala virus - physiology
Reproduction
Rodent Diseases - physiopathology
Seasons
Abstract
1. Pathogens often cause detrimental effects to their hosts and, consequently, may influence host population dynamics that may, in turn, feed back to pathogen transmission dynamics. Understanding fitness effects of pathogens upon animal host populations can help to predict the risks that zoonotic pathogens pose to humans. 2. Here we determine whether chronic infection by Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) affects important fitness-related traits, namely the probability of breeding, reproductive effort and mother and offspring condition, in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). Using 9 years empirical data in a PUUV endemic area in Central Finland, we found differences between reproductive characteristics of PUUV-infected and uninfected female bank voles. 3. Young infected females had a significantly higher, and old individuals lower, likelihood of reproducing than uninfected animals during the middle of the breeding season. The implication is that PUUV infection may have long-term deleterious effects that are observed at old age, while in young individuals, the infection may enhance breeding probability by directing resources towards current breeding. 4. Moreover, PUUV infection was related with the mother's body condition. Infected mothers were in poorer condition than uninfected mothers in the early breeding season, but were in better condition than uninfected mothers during the middle of the breeding season. Offspring body condition was positively associated with mother's body condition, which, in turn, was related to the PUUV infection status of the mother. 5. Our findings indicate that chronic infection may affect the reproduction of female hosts, but the effect is dependent on the host age. The effect of chronic hantavirus infection was small and density-independent and hence unlikely to contribute to the cyclic population dynamics of the host. However, the effects on a female's reproductive output might affect the abundance of young susceptible individuals in the population and hence influence the transmission and persistence of the pathogen. Although experimental and long-term capture-mark-recapture studies are required to further clarify the fitness effects of hantavirus infection and their consequences for pathogen dynamics, this study shows that the infection may have complex effects that are dependent on the age of the individual and the time of the breeding season.
PubMed ID
25965086 View in PubMed
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Alteration of neuro-dopamine and steroid hormone homeostasis in wild Bank voles in relation to tissue concentrations of PFAS at a Nordic skiing area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304054
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Feb 20; 756:143745
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-20-2021
Author
Randi Grønnestad
Daniel Schlenk
Åse Krøkje
Veerle L B Jaspers
Bjørn Munro Jenssen
Scott Coffin
Luísa Becker Bertotto
Marissa Giroux
Jan L Lyche
Augustine Arukwe
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: randi.gronnestad@ntnu.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2021 Feb 20; 756:143745
Date
Feb-20-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Dopamine
Fluorocarbons
Homeostasis
Hormones
Norway
Skiing
Steroids
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are contaminants that are applied in a wide range of consumer products, including ski products. The present study investigated the neuro-dopamine (DA) and cellular steroid hormone homeostasis of wild Bank voles (Myodes glareolus) from a skiing area in Norway (Trondheim), in relation to tissue concentrations of PFAS. We found a positive association between brain DA concentrations and the concentration of several PFAS, while there was a negative association between PFAS and dopamine receptor 1 (dr1) mRNA. The ratio between DA and its metabolites (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid: DOPAC and homovanillic acid: HVA) showed a negative association between DOPAC/DA and several PFAS, suggesting that PFAS altered the metabolism of DA via monoamine oxidase (Mao). This assumption is supported by an observed negative association between mao mRNA and PFAS. Previous studies have shown that DA homeostasis can indirectly regulate cellular estrogen (E2) and testosterone (T) biosynthesis. We found no association between DA and steroid hormone levels, while there was a negative association between some PFAS and T concentrations, suggesting that PFAS might affect T through other mechanisms. The results from the current study indicate that PFAS may alter neuro-DA and steroid hormone homeostasis in Bank voles, with potential consequences on reproduction and general health.
PubMed ID
33250251 View in PubMed
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Alteration of testicular response to long photoperiod by transient exposure to short photoperiod in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6829
Source
J Reprod Fertil. 1997 Mar;109(2):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
B A Gower
T R Nagy
M H Stetson
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark 19716, USA.
Source
J Reprod Fertil. 1997 Mar;109(2):257-62
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn - growth & development - physiology
Arvicolinae - growth & development - physiology
Body Weight
Male
Organ Size
Photoperiod
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Seminal Vesicles - anatomy & histology
Sexual Maturation - physiology
Testis - anatomy & histology - growth & development - physiology
Abstract
The reproductive response of collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus) to photoperiod is unique for rodents. Whereas most reproductively photoresponsive rodents show maximal gonadal growth when exposed to long photoperiod (long day), collared lemmings show delayed maturation when born and maintained under this condition. However, transfer of lemmings from short photoperiod (short day) to long day results in maximal gonadal growth, indicating that the response to long day depends upon photoperiod history. We hypothesized that the slowing of maturation observed in animals born and maintained on long day reflects an inability to respond fully to long day, resulting from the absence of previous exposure to short day. To determine whether young lemmings born in long day are capable of being stimulated by long day, we exposed them at weaning (19 days of age) to 1, 6 or 10 weeks of short day, and then challenged them with a second exposure to long day. Relative to animals transferred permanently to short day at weaning, lemmings exposed to 6 weeks of short day showed accelerated gonadal growth after both 5 and 10 weeks of subsequent exposure to long day, and those exposed to 10 weeks of short day had larger testes after 6 weeks of long day. Thus, during transient exposure to short day, the animals acquired sensitivity to the stimulatory effects of long day. The responses of body mass, bifid claw width and pelage colour to the photoperiod manipulations did not parallel that of the gonads, indicating independent regulation of somatic and reproductive parameters. The unique way in which the reproductive system of collared lemmings responds to photoperiod may reflect evolution in an environment where the production of offspring during periods of unchanging long day (for example, the Arctic summer) is not selectively advantageous.
PubMed ID
9155735 View in PubMed
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183 records – page 1 of 19.