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[Chromosomal differences in moose (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Alces alces L.)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61926
Source
Genetika. 1997 Jul;33(7):974-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
G G Boeskorov
Source
Genetika. 1997 Jul;33(7):974-8
Date
Jul-1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artiodactyla - genetics
Chromosomes
English Abstract
Karyotyping
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Earlier studies on differences in moose (Alces alces) chromosome sets concerned only European (Scandinavia, Finland, the Volga region, and western Siberia) and American (the United States and Canada) forms. The first group had a 68-chromosome set, and the second group, a 70-chromosome set. These differences were considered interspecies chromosomal polymorphism. However, the chromosome number in A. alces living in eastern and northeastern Siberia remains unknown, although these data are important for elucidation of the geographical variation of karyotypes of moose from genus Alces. Four moose from different regions of Sakha were studied. It was found that their karyotypes contained 70 chromosomes; i.e., they were similar to the American form. These data indicate a strong differentiation within the species. Two chromosomal forms can be distinguished: the European one (2n = 68) living in Europe and western Siberia and the American one (2n = 70) living in North America, the Far East, and eastern Siberia. The existence of two forms is confirmed by data on their morphology, sound signals, electrophoretic mobility of proteins, and differences in nutrition. These results indicate that long-term isolation of European and American moose led to the high divergence between these two forms; therefore, they can be considered different species.
PubMed ID
9378292 View in PubMed
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Coevolution and biogeography among Nematodirinae (Nematoda: Trichostrongylina) Lagomorpha and Artiodactyla (Mammalia): exploring determinants of history and structure for the northern fauna across the holarctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95787
Source
J Parasitol. 2005 Apr;91(2):358-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Hoberg Eric P
Author Affiliation
U.S. National Parasite Collection and the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, BARC East No. 1180, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, Maryland 20705-2350, USA. ehoberg@anri.barc.usda.gov
Source
J Parasitol. 2005 Apr;91(2):358-69
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Artiodactyla - parasitology
Evolution
Geography
Lagomorpha - parasitology
Phylogeny
Strongylida - anatomy & histology - classification - physiology
Strongylida Infections - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Abstract
Nematodes of the subfamily Nematodirinae are characteristic components of a Holarctic fauna. The topology of a generic-level phylogenetic hypothesis, patterns of diversity, and geographic distributions for respective nematode taxa in conjunction with data for host occurrence are consistent with primary distributions determined across Beringia for species of Murielus, Rauschia, Nematodirus, and Nematodirella. Ancestral hosts are represented by Lagomorpha, with evidence for a minimum of 1 host-switching-event and subsequent radiation in the Artiodactyla. Diversification may reflect vicariance of respective faunas along with episodic or cyclical range expansion and isolation across Beringia during the late Tertiary and Quaternary. Secondarily, species of Nematodirus attained a distribution in the Neotropical region with minimal diversification of an endemic fauna represented by Nematodirus molini among tayassuids, Nematodirus lamae among camelids and Nematodirus urichi in cervids during the Pleistocene. Nematodirines are a core component of an Arctic-Boreal fauna of zooparasitic nematodes (defined by latitude and altitude) adapted to transmission in extreme environments characterized by seasonally low temperatures and varying degrees of desiccation. The history and distribution of this fauna is examined in the context of biotic and abiotic determinants for geographic colonization and host switching with an exploration of predicted responses of complex host-parasite systems to ecological perturbation under a regime of global climate change.
PubMed ID
15986612 View in PubMed
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Costs of gestation in an Arctic ruminant: copper reserves in muskoxen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4486
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2003 Jan;134(1):157-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Emmajean P Rombach
Perry S Barboza
John E Blake
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska, P.O. Box 757000, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7000, USA. fsept@uaf.edu
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2003 Jan;134(1):157-68
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artiodactyla - physiology
Ceruloplasmin - metabolism
Copper - metabolism
Female
Fetus - metabolism
Gestational Age
Gluconates - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Injections, Subcutaneous
Liver - metabolism
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Metallothionein - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Animal - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The transfer of trace minerals between mother and fetus may be critical for survival of young ruminants especially among species at high latitudes, which gestate during a long winter and grow through a brief summer. We examined the distribution of copper and metalloproteins (ceruloplasmin and metallothionein) in muskoxen and their fetuses, three times during gestation. Hepatic levels of copper were high in mothers (179 microg g(-1) whole tissue) and did not change through gestation, whereas fetuses accumulated large reserves of Cu (>300 microg g(-1)), likely stored in proteins such as metallothionein, during the last third of gestation. The effect of fetal Cu demands on the pregnant female was tested by supplementation of Cu by subcutaneous injections of Cu gluconate (30 mg Cu/week) during pregnancy. Maternal copper supplementation did not significantly increase hepatic Cu in newborns (412 microg g(-1) for supplemented vs. 303 microg g(-1) for unsupplemented neonates), probably because the diet was already adequate in copper (14 microg g(-1) dry matter). Ceruloplasmin activity declined in pregnant muskoxen that had not received injections of Cu and suggested increased systemic demands for copper during late gestation. Supplies of Cu to the fetus could be limited either by low levels of Cu in the maternal liver, or in the maternal diet during late winter when fetal gains in mass and liver Cu are greatest.
PubMed ID
12524028 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology and diagnosis of echinococcosis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111351
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Mar 11;96(10):600-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1967
Author
G A Webster
T W Cameron
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Mar 11;96(10):600-7
Date
Mar-11-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artiodactyla
Canada
Carnivora
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Echinococcosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
TWO SPECIES OF ECHINOCOCCUS OCCUR IN CANADA: (1) E. multilocularis and (2) E. granulosus. E. multilocularis, originating in the Arctic, is spreading southwards and has reached Saskatchewan and the Dakotas. The original hosts are foxes but dogs and cats are alternatives. The larvae occur in field mice as multilocular microcysts containing numerous protoscolices, but in man the cysts are alveolar and sterile and resemble both in histology and growth a cholangiocellular carcinoma of the liver with metastases. Signs and symptoms are chronic and poorly defined. Diagnosis is difficult. Test antigens are not yet satisfactory. E. granulosus has a sylvatic cycle, the adult tapeworms living in wolves and dogs, while the larvae occur only in Cervidae and man. The cysts occur almost exclusively in the lungs as unilocular, macrocystic, relatively benign tumours, although abnormal complications can occur. The Casoni intradermal sensitivity test, its technique and interpretation are discussed.
Notes
Cites: Science. 1964 Sep 4;145(3636):106614172624
Cites: Ann Surg. 1963 Apr;157:548-5914000097
Cites: Science. 1965 Nov 5;150(3697):7635891703
PubMed ID
6066987 View in PubMed
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Fallout radionuclides in Alaskan food chains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1027
Source
American Journal of Veterinary Research. 1966 Jan; 27(116): 359-366.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966
Author
Hanson, W.C.
Author Affiliation
Battelle
Source
American Journal of Veterinary Research. 1966 Jan; 27(116): 359-366.
Date
1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Anaktuvuk Pass
Little Diomede
Kotzebue
Barrow
Point Hope
Diet, traditional
Food chain
Iodine-131
Strontium-90
Cesium-137
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Alaska
Animals
Artiodactyla - metabolism
Cesium isotopes
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Inuits
Isotopes
Lichens
Meat
Seasons
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 827.
PubMed ID
5950163 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indicators of success for smart law enforcement in protected areas: A case study for Russian Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) reserves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277218
Source
Integr Zool. 2016 Jan;11(1):2-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Michiel H H Hötte
Igor A Kolodin
Sergei L Bereznuk
Jonathan C Slaght
Linda L Kerley
Svetlana V Soutyrina
Galina P Salkina
Olga Y Zaumyslova
Emma J Stokes
Dale G Miquelle
Source
Integr Zool. 2016 Jan;11(1):2-15
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artiodactyla
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Endangered Species
Law Enforcement - methods
Predatory Behavior
Russia
Tigers
Abstract
Although considerable conservation resources have been committed to develop and use law enforcement monitoring and management tools such as SMART, measures of success are ill-defined and, to date, few reports detail results post-implementation. Here, we present 4 case studies from protected areas with Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) in Russia, in which indicators of success were defined and evaluated at each. The ultimate goal was an increase in tiger numbers to 1 individual/100 km(2) at each site. We predicted that improvements in law enforcement effectiveness would be followed by increases in prey numbers and, subsequently, tiger numbers. We used short-term and long-term indicators of success, including: (i) patrol team effort and effectiveness; (ii) catch per unit effort indicators (to measure reductions in threats); and (iii) changes in target species numbers. In addition to implementing a monitoring system, we focused on improving law enforcement management using an adaptive management process. Over 4 years, we noted clear increases in patrol effort and a partial reduction in threats. Although we did not detect clear trends in ungulate numbers, tiger populations remained stable or increased, suggesting that poaching of tigers may be more limiting than prey depletion. Increased effectiveness is needed before a clear reduction in threats can be noted, and more time is needed before detecting responses in target populations. Nonetheless, delineation of concrete goals and indicators of success provide a means of evaluating progress and weaknesses. Such monitoring should be a central component of law enforcement strategies for protected areas.
PubMed ID
26458501 View in PubMed
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Moose milk and hair element levels and relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5018
Source
J Wildl Dis. 1976 Apr;12(2):202-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1976
Author
A W Franzmann
A. Flynn
P D Arneson
Source
J Wildl Dis. 1976 Apr;12(2):202-7
Date
Apr-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - analysis
Animals
Artiodactyla - metabolism
Cadmium - analysis
Calcium - analysis
Cattle
Comparative Study
Copper - analysis
Female
Hair - analysis
Iron - analysis
Lead - analysis
Magnesium - analysis
Male
Milk - analysis
Potassium - analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Selenium - analysis
Sodium - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Milk was collected from 21 Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) at the Kenai Moose Research Center (MRC), Soldotna, Alaska nad analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy for Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn. Hair samples were collected from 100 moose at the MRC to correspond with the lactation period and serve as a metabolic indicator of mineral elements stored in tissue. Published analyses of bovine milk were compared to moose milk; Al, Fe, Se and Zn were higher in moose milk by factors of 1.6 to 290. Elements potentially influenced by nutrition and those determined genetically were also considered. Elements in moose milk and hair values were compared, since mineral element levels in hair potentially reflect the availability and intake of these elements. Calcium and Mg were the only values in hair lower than the values in milk (factors of 4.2 and 1.5 respectively). Moose, as well as domestic cattle, apparently are subjected to lactation stress by the genetically determined levels of Ca and Mg in milk.
PubMed ID
933310 View in PubMed
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Natural levels of lead-210, polonium-210 and radium-226 in humans and biota of the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102982
Source
Nature. 1966 Jun 11;210(5041):1094-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966 Jun 11

23 records – page 1 of 3.