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Adding attenuation corrected images in myocardial perfusion imaging reduces the need for a rest study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115070
Source
BMC Med Imaging. 2013;13:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Elin Trägårdh
Sven Valind
Lars Edenbrandt
Author Affiliation
Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Entrance 44, 205 05 Malmö, Sweden. elin.tragardh@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Med Imaging. 2013;13:14
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Artifacts
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radionuclide imaging
Exercise Test - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Image Enhancement - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Perfusion Imaging - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Rest
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology and the Society of Nuclear Medicine conclude that incorporation of attenuation corrected (AC) images in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) will improve diagnostic accuracy. The aim was to investigate the value of adding AC stress-only images for the decision whether a rest study is necessary or not.
1,261 patients admitted to (99m)Tc MPS were studied. The stress studies were interpreted by two physicians who judged each study as "no rest study necessary" or "rest study necessary", by evaluating NC stress-only and NC + AC stress-only images. When there was disagreement between the two physicians, a third physician evaluated the studies. Thus, agreement between 2 out of 3 physicians was evaluated.
The physicians assessed 214 more NC + AC images than NC images as "no rest study necessary" (17% of the study population). The number of no-rest-study-required was significantly higher for NC + AC studies compared to NC studies (859 vs 645 cases (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23547878 View in PubMed
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Clinical utility of ultra high pitch dual source thoracic CT imaging of acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department: are we one step closer towards a non-gated triple rule out?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113301
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2013 Oct;82(10):1793-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Daniel J Hou
David K Tso
Chris Davison
Joao Inacio
Luck J Louis
Savvakis Nicolaou
Anja J Reimann
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 W 10th Avenue, Vancouver BC V5Z 4E3 Canada. danieljameshou@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2013 Oct;82(10):1793-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiography - statistics & numerical data
Artifacts
British Columbia - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - radiography
Radiation Dosage
Radiography, Dual-Energy Scanned Projection - statistics & numerical data
Radiography, Thoracic - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and the radiation dose of an ultra high pitch CT scan for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism and visualization of cardiac structures in comparison to our institution's standard pulmonary embolism protocol.
The study cohort consisted of 115 consecutive patients, 57 underwent CT pulmonary angiography on a dual source 128 slice scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition FLASH) via an ultra high pitch mode (Pitch 2.8) while 58 were scanned on a dual source 64 slice scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source) with standard pitch (Pitch 0.9). Qualitative image assessment was determined by two blinded radiologists with 3 and 15 years' experience in chest and cardiac CT. Quantitative image assessment was determined by the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Effective radiation dose was calculated via the product of the dose length product.
For the ultra high pitch protocol, 14% (8/57) were positive for pulmonary embolus compared to 13.7% (8/58) for the standard pitch group. 98.2% of the ultra high pitch scans were diagnostic for pulmonary embolus vs. 94.8% of the standard protocol. Visualization of cardiac structures was significantly improved with the ultra high pitch protocol (p
PubMed ID
23743054 View in PubMed
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Subject movement during multislice interleaved MR acquisitions: prevalence and potential effect on MRI-derived brain pathology measurements and multicenter clinical trials of therapeutics for multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124440
Source
J Magn Reson Imaging. 2012 Aug;36(2):332-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Elias L Gedamu
Abraham Gedamu
Author Affiliation
McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. elias.gedamu@mcgill.ca
Source
J Magn Reson Imaging. 2012 Aug;36(2):332-43
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Artifacts
Brain - pathology
Canada - epidemiology
Clinical Trials as Topic
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Movement
Multiple Sclerosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To show the prevalence of inter-packet motion in clinical trial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and the effect of inter-packet motion on MRI-derived brain pathology measurements.
We present a method to detect and quantify inter-packet motion, apply it to 2384 MRIs to determine the prevalence of inter-packet motion in clinical trial data, and show the effect of inter-packet motion on measuring multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion volumes.
Experiments with simulated data showed that the detection procedure was accurate at measuring the amount of movement between packets and quantifying the amount of missing data. Application to clinical trial data demonstrated that a large number of MRIs had missing data due to inter-packet motion; 20% of the images had greater than 10% of the data missing and 10% of the images had greater than 15% of the data missing. These levels corresponded to thresholds where lesions were difficult to visually identify or disappeared completely. Lesion volume measurement errors ranged from 1.3 ± 0.5% to 9.9 ± 6.3%.
Inter-packet motion can introduce substantial errors to MRI-derived brain pathology measurements. The prevalence of inter-packet motion is substantial in MS clinical trial data. Automated detection procedures should be implemented to increase the fidelity of MRI-derived measurements.
PubMed ID
22581754 View in PubMed
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