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Arthroplasty implant registries over the past five decades: Development, current, and future impact.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300373
Source
J Orthop Res. 2018 09; 36(9):2319-2330
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
09-2018
Author
Henrik Malchau
Göran Garellick
Daniel Berry
William H Harris
Otto Robertson
Johan Kärrlholm
David Lewallen
Charles R Bragdon
Lars Lidgren
Peter Herberts
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Molndal, Sweden.
Source
J Orthop Res. 2018 09; 36(9):2319-2330
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Elbow - methods - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - methods - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Shoulder - methods - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Elbow Prosthesis
Evidence-Based Medicine
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
International Cooperation
Knee Prosthesis
Orthopedics
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Shoulder Prosthesis
Societies, Medical
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Local, regional, and national registries have played an important role in the development of hip and knee arthroplasty and the treatment of patients with various maladies of these joints. Four arthroplasty registries stand out as leading forces behind the drive to popularize the use of registries and pursue the concept of evidence based medicine. The Mayo registry, started by Mark Coventry, is recognized as the oldest continuing registry for arthroplasty. The Harris Registry at Massachusetts General Hospital, along with the Mayo Registry, has greatly contributed to the advancement of arthroplasty surgery and have served an important role of identifying poorly performing implants and techniques in the United States. The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Registry is the oldest national registry dedicated to joint arthroplasty and along with the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Registry have established the infrastructure, analysis and reporting mechanisms, and leadership that has enabled other countries to subsequently develop national registries around the world. As more countries have adopted the concept of national registries, a new area of research is possible by pooling the resources of large registries as is now occurring with the Nordic countries. Several international organizations have been formed to promote future collaboration and develop international standards. The process of globalization of registries is a result of continued efforts over the past 50 years in improving and disseminating the knowledge gained from the early registries. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:2319-2330, 2018.
PubMed ID
29663575 View in PubMed
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Endstage arthritis following tibia plateau fractures: average 10-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127725
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Apr;55(2):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Ramin Mehin
Peter O'Brien
Henry Broekhuyse
Piotr Blachut
Pierre Guy
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre, Abbotsford, BC. rmehin@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Apr;55(2):87-94
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty - methods
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia
Causality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation, Internal - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Intra-Articular Fractures - epidemiology - radiography - surgery
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - radiography - surgery
Osteotomy - methods
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Tibial Fractures - epidemiology - radiography - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with tibial plateau fractures are believed to have an increased risk for posttraumatic arthritis that may require reconstructive surgery. The incidence of this problem is, however, unknown. We sought to determine the average 10-year incidence of posttraumatic arthritis necessitating reconstructive surgery following tibia plateau fractures.
We used data from our orthopedic trauma database to identify patients with operatively treated tibia plateau fractures. Their cases were cross-referenced with the data from our province's administrative health database and tracked overtime for the performance of reconstructive knee surgery. The average follow-up was 10 years.
There were 311 tibial plateau fractures treated at our institution between 1987 and 1994. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for the primary outcome of endstage arthritis was 96%. Analysis of the secondary outcome measure, specifically surgeries for what was thought to be "minor arthritis," revealed a 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival of 87%.
Our findings may be used to counsel patients who require surgical treatment of tibia plateau fractures about the long-term risk of requiring reconstructive knee surgery for endstage arthritis in the knee.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22269220 View in PubMed
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Failure mechanisms after unicompartmental and tricompartmental primary knee replacement with cement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78612
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007 Mar;89(3):519-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Furnes O.
Espehaug B.
Lie S A
Vollset S E
Engesaeter L B
Havelin L I
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. ove.furnes@haukeland.no
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007 Mar;89(3):519-25
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Bone Cements
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Knee Prosthesis
Middle Aged
Norway
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Failure
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Concern exists regarding the durability of unicompartmental knee replacements. The purpose of the present study was to compare the early failure rates and failure mechanisms of primary cemented unicompartmental knee replacements with those of primary cemented tricompartmental total knee replacements. METHODS: The rates of failure of primary cemented unicompartmental knee replacements (n = 2288) and tricompartmental total knee replacements (n = 3032) as reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register from January 1994 through December 2004 were compared with use of Kaplan-Meier estimated survival rates and Cox multiple regression. RESULTS: The ten-year survival probability was 80.1% (95% confidence interval, 76.0% to 84.2%) for unicompartmental knee replacements, compared with 92.0% (95% confidence interval, 90.4 to 93.6%) for total knee replacements, with a relative risk of revision of 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 2.5) (p
PubMed ID
17332100 View in PubMed
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High tibial osteotomy in Sweden, 1998-2007: a population-based study of the use and rate of revision to knee arthroplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124512
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Jun;83(3):244-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Annette W-Dahl
Otto Robertsson
L Stefan Lohmander
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. annette.w-dahl@med.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Jun;83(3):244-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - surgery
Osteotomy - methods
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Tibia - surgery
Abstract
Most studies on high tibial osteotomies (HTOs) have been hospital-based and have included a limited number of patients. We evaluated the use and outcome-expressed as rate of revision to knee arthroplasty-of HTO performed in Sweden with 9 million inhabitants, 1998-2007.
3, 161 HTO procedures on patients 30 years or older (69% men) who were operated on for knee osteoarthritis in Sweden, 1998-2007, were identified through the inpatient and outpatient care registers of the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Pertinent data were verified through surgical records. Conversions of HTO to knee arthroplasty before 2010 were identified through the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). The 10-year survival was determined using revision to an arthroplasty as the endpoint.
The number of HTOs decreased by one third between 1998 and 2007, from 388 operations a year to 257 a year. Most of the HTOs were performed with open wedge osteotomy using external fixation. The cumulative revision rate at 10 years was 30% (95% CI: 28-32). The risk of revision increased with increasing age and was higher in women than in men (RR = 1.3, CI: 1.1-1.5).
If being without an artificial joint implant is considered to be beneficial, then HTO is an excellent alternative to knee arthroplasty in younger and/or physically active patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis.
Notes
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Feb;75(2):196-2018423180
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1990 Apr;61(2):128-302360428
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1994 Aug;65(4):375-867976280
Cites: Knee. 2004 Dec;11(6):439-4415581761
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2006 Feb;14(2):190-516275143
Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2006 Feb;14(2):149-5216010584
Cites: Int Orthop. 2006 Oct;30(5):403-816688454
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Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2008 Jan;128(1):111-517828411
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 May;90(5):592-618450624
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Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):90-420175656
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Cites: Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2011 Jan;19(1):122-720821190
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:4621320313
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1999 Oct;(367):18-2710546594
Cites: J Knee Surg. 2003 Jan;16(1):21-612568262
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Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2003 Feb 5;4:112570876
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Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Dec;75(12):1844-528258558
PubMed ID
22574818 View in PubMed
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The patella in total knee arthroplasty: resurfacing or nonresurfacing of patella.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194671
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2001;9 Suppl 1:S21-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Lindstrand
O. Robertsson
S. Lewold
S. Toksvig-Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, 22185 Lund, Sweden. Anders.LIndstrand@ort.lu.se
Source
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2001;9 Suppl 1:S21-3
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - adverse effects
Male
Patella - surgery
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Data from the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Registry were analyzed to compare bi- and tricompartmental knee arthroplasties carried out in patients operated on for arthrosis in 1990-1996. Of the 16,607 primary arthroplasties that were carried out there were 5,139 with patellar replacement in the primary procedure and 10,928 without. By April 1998, 280 revisions were performed, 250 of these cases were analyzed in this study. Patella-related complications were commonly the reason for early revision: in 99 of the 168 knees with a primary bicompartmental procedure and in 36 of the 82 knees with a primary tricompartmental procedure. This presentation merely analyzes the extent of patellar problems in knee arthroplasty, as a detailed analysis of the causes of this common problem is not possible using data from a national multicenter study.
PubMed ID
11354863 View in PubMed
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Risk of total knee arthroplasty after operatively treated tibial plateau fracture: a matched-population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105278
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):144-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2014
Author
David Wasserstein
Patrick Henry
J Michael Paterson
Hans J Kreder
Richard Jenkinson
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, MG-314, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada. E-mail address for D. Wasserstein: david.wasserstein@mail.utoronto.ca.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014 Jan 15;96(2):144-50
Date
Jan-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation, Internal - adverse effects - methods
Fracture Healing - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Intra-Articular Fractures - radiography - surgery
Knee Injuries - complications - radiography - surgery
Male
Menisci, Tibial - injuries - surgery
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoarthritis, Knee - etiology - physiopathology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology - surgery
Proportional Hazards Models
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Tibial Fractures - complications - radiography - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aims of operative treatment of displaced tibial plateau fractures are to stabilize the injured knee to restore optimal function and to minimize the risk of posttraumatic arthritis and the eventual need for total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of our study was to define the rate of subsequent total knee arthroplasty after tibial plateau fractures in a large cohort and to compare that rate with the rate in the general population.
All patients sixteen years of age or older who had undergone surgical treatment of a tibial plateau fracture from 1996 to 2009 in the province of Ontario, Canada, were identified from administrative health databases with use of surgeon fee codes. Each member of the tibial plateau fracture cohort was matched to four individuals from the general population according to age, sex, income, and urban/rural residence. The rates of total knee arthroplasty at two, five, and ten years were compared by using time-to-event analysis. A separate Cox proportional hazards model was used to explore the influence of patient, provider, and surgical factors on the time to total knee arthroplasty.
We identified 8426 patients (48.5% female; median age, 48.9 years) who had undergone fixation of a tibial plateau fracture and matched them to 33,698 controls. The two, five, and ten-year rates of total knee arthroplasty in the plateau fracture and control cohorts were 0.32% versus 0.29%, 5.3% versus 0.82%, and 7.3% versus 1.8%, respectively (p
PubMed ID
24430414 View in PubMed
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Ten-year survival of the cemented Freeman-Samuelson primary knee arthroplasty. Data from the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register and the Royal London Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198210
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000 May;82(4):506-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
O. Robertsson
G. Scott
M A Freeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, The Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000 May;82(4):506-7
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods - statistics & numerical data
Bone Cements - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Humans
London
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Sweden
Abstract
We report a ten-year rate of survival of 96% for the cemented Freeman-Samuelson knee arthroplasty in patients from the Swedish Knee Registry and the Royal London Hospital with revision for aseptic loosening as the criterion for failure.
PubMed ID
10855871 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.