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Antidepressant use among persons with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis: a nationwide register-based study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258927
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2014;43(5):364-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
J. Jyrkkä
H. Kautiainen
H. Koponen
K. Puolakka
L J Virta
T. Pohjolainen
E. Lönnroos
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2014;43(5):364-70
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate antidepressant use in a nationwide cohort of persons with incident rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2000-2007 in Finland.
Register data from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland were used to evaluate antidepressant use in = 50-year-old incident RA patients (n = 10,356) and the same-age general population.
Of the RA patients, 10.0% (n = 1034) had used antidepressants during the year preceding RA diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of antidepressant initiations after RA diagnosis was 11.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.0-12.9] for men and 16.2% (95% CI 14.9-17.5) for women at the end of follow-up (mean 4.4 years). Female gender [age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.39, 95% CI 1.21-1.60] and increasing number of comorbidities (p for linearity
PubMed ID
24650284 View in PubMed
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Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264921
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2014;33(10):1403-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Gunnel Östlund
Mathilda Björk
Ingrid Thyberg
Mikael Thyberg
Eva Valtersson
Birgitta Stenström
Annette Sverker
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2014;33(10):1403-13
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Clinical Coding
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions and their relationship to participation restrictions is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using the critical incident technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized. Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings and getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public. Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear, and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge.
PubMed ID
24838364 View in PubMed
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Life satisfaction in early rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80210
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Sep;13(3):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Karlsson Berit
Berglin Ewa
Wållberg-Jonsson Solveig
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. berit.v.karlsson@vll.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Sep;13(3):193-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe life satisfaction prospectively in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to investigate its correlation with disease activity. The early RA group was compared with RA patients with longstanding disease and with a reference group. Gender differences were also compared. Patients with early RA, treated by a multidisciplinary team, reported their life satisfaction by completing a questionnaire. Disease activity score, patient global assessment, and pain were scored at onset of disease and after two years. The patients with early RA were less satisfied with life as a whole at disease onset compared with the reference group, as was a cohort of patients with longstanding disease. Patients with early RA also reported low levels of satisfaction with self-care activities, work, and sexual life. The women reported themselves more satisfied than men. After two years, a slight increase in the reported levels of satisfaction could be seen for life as a whole and for five of the eight domains. No correlation was found between disease activity variables and satisfaction with life as a whole. There were, however, positive correlations between disease activity and satisfaction both with partnership and with family life after two years, i.e. the higher disease activity the higher satisfaction with partnership relation and family life. In contrast, patients with greater disease activity were less satisfied with self-care activities. The results of this study indicate that greater effort is needed to assist patients with early RA to cope with problems concerning self-care activities, sexual life, and work.
PubMed ID
17042467 View in PubMed
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[Quality of life of Saratov region residents with rheumatoid arthritis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162037
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2007;85(6):50-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
N M Nikitina
Ia O Simonova
A P Rebrov
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2007;85(6):50-4
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology
Catchment Area (Health)
Demography
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of life (QL) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Saratov region. The study was conducted within the framework of the program MCSQL (multi-center study of quality of life). The work presents the results of an investigation of the center of Saratov. The subjects were 139 patients (117 women; 22 men) with a valid diagnosis of RA. Deteriorated QL indices were revealed in all the patients; these indices correlated with the duration and activity of the disease as well as with gender and age.
PubMed ID
17682494 View in PubMed
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Subsequent risk of hospitalization for neuropsychiatric disorders in patients with rheumatic diseases: a nationwide study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86348
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 May;65(5):501-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Sundquist Kristina
Li Xinjun
Hemminki Kari
Sundquist Jan
Author Affiliation
Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Alfred Nobels alle 12, SE-14183, Huddinge, Sweden. kristina.sundquist@ki.se
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 May;65(5):501-7
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis and hospitalization for psychiatric disorders, as well as the association between hospitalization for dementia or delirium and systemic lupus erythematosus, by using a novel, large-scale approach. DESIGN: Cohort study with follow-up between 1973 and 2004. PARTICIPANTS: The entire Swedish population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Affective, psychotic, neurotic, and personality disorders as well as dementia and delirium. RESULTS: Individuals with rheumatic diseases had a higher risk of psychiatric disorders than the general population. Those with systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis had a higher risk of subsequent psychiatric disorders than did patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The significant standardized incidence ratios for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis were 1.45, 2.38, and 1.69, respectively, for men, and 1.36, 2.16, and 1.95, respectively, for women. Differences were also found based on subtypes of the rheumatic disease and the psychiatric disorder, sex, and various follow-up intervals. Systemic lupus erythematosus carried an increased risk of dementia and delirium. Only women with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus had an increased risk of psychotic disorders and severe depression. CONCLUSION: Health care providers who encounter patients with rheumatic diseases should be aware that these patients are more likely to develop neuropsychiatric disorders and that some subgroups seem to be more vulnerable than others.
PubMed ID
18458201 View in PubMed
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Trait emotional intelligence and inflammatory diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256590
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2014;19(2):180-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Sebastiano Costa
K V Petrides
Taavi Tillmann
Author Affiliation
a Department of Human and Social Sciences , University of Messina , Messina , Italy.
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2014;19(2):180-9
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Emotional Intelligence - physiology
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology
Self Efficacy
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Researchers have become increasingly interested in the psychological aspects of inflammatory disorders. Within this line of research, the present study compares the trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) profiles of 827 individuals with various inflammatory conditions (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis, and RA plus one comorbidity) against 496 healthy controls. Global trait EI scores did not show significant differences between these groups, although some differences were observed when comparisons were carried out against alternative control groups. Significant differences were found on the trait EI factors of Well-being (where the healthy group scored higher than the RA group) and Sociability (where the healthy group scored higher than both the RA group and the RA plus one comorbidity group). The discussion centers on the multifarious links and interplay between emotions and inflammatory conditions.
PubMed ID
23725416 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.