Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Canadian variation by province in rheumatoid arthritis initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: results from the optimization of adalimumab trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140779
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Dec;37(12):2469-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Christopher Pease
Janet E Pope
Carter Thorne
Boulos Paul Haraoui
Don Truong
Claire Bombardier
Jessica Widdifield
Eliofotisti Psaradellis
John S Sampalis
Ashley Bonner
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Dec;37(12):2469-74
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Canada
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - immunology
Abstract
We compared variations among Canadian provinces in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy.
Data were obtained from the Optimization of Humira trial (OH) and from the Ontario Biologics Research Initiative (OBRI). Baseline characteristics were compared between regions: Ontario (ON), Quebec (QC), and other provinces (OTH). We compared Ontario OH to OBRI patients who were initiating anti-TNF therapy.
In 300 OH patients, mean age was 54.8 years (13.3). There were 151 (50.3%) ON patients, 57 from QC (19%), and 92 from OTH (30.7%). Regional differences were seen in the number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) ever taken (ON: 3.8 ± 1.4, QC: 3.1 ± 1.1, OTH: 3.3 ± 1.4; p
PubMed ID
20843910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Direct comparison of treatment responses, remission rates, and drug adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab: results from eight years of surveillance of clinical practice in the nationwide Danish DANBIO registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98495
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2010 Jan;62(1):22-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Merete Lund Hetland
Ib Jarle Christensen
Ulrik Tarp
Lene Dreyer
Annette Hansen
Ib Tønder Hansen
Gina Kollerup
Louise Linde
Hanne M Lindegaard
Uta Engling Poulsen
Annette Schlemmer
Dorte Vendelbo Jensen
Signe Jensen
Gisela Hostenkamp
Mikkel Østergaard
Author Affiliation
DANBIO Registry, Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Hvidovre, Denmark. merete.hetland@dadlnet.dk
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2010 Jan;62(1):22-32
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Denmark
Female
Health status
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - therapeutic use
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor - therapeutic use
Registries
Remission Induction
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors directly regarding the rates of treatment response, remission, and the drug survival rate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to identify clinical prognostic factors for response. METHODS: The nationwide DANBIO registry collects data on rheumatology patients receiving routine care. For the present study, we included patients from DANBIO who had RA (n = 2,326) in whom the first biologic treatment was initiated (29% received adalimumab, 22% received etanercept, and 49% received infliximab). Baseline predictors of treatment response were identified. The odds ratios (ORs) for clinical responses and remission and hazard ratios (HRs) for drug withdrawal were calculated, corrected for age, disease duration, the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), seropositivity, concomitant methotrexate and prednisolone, number of previous disease-modifying drugs, center, and functional status (Health Assessment Questionnaire score). RESULTS: Seventy percent improvement according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (an ACR70 response) was achieved in 19% of patients after 6 months. Older age, concomitant prednisolone treatment, and low functional status at baseline were negative predictors. The ORs (95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) for an ACR70 response were 2.05 (95% CI 1.52-2.76) for adalimumab versus infliximab, 1.78 (95% CI 1.28-2.50) for etanercept versus infliximab, and 1.15 (95% CI 0.82-1.60) for adalimumab versus etanercept. Similar predictors and ORs were observed for a good response according to the European League Against Rheumatism criteria, DAS28 remission, and Clinical Disease Activity Index remission. At 48 months, the HRs for drug withdrawal were 1.98 for infliximab versus etanercept (95% 1.63-2.40), 1.35 for infliximab versus adalimumab (95% CI 1.15-1.58), and 1.47 for adalimumab versus etanercept (95% CI 1.20-1.80). CONCLUSION: Older age, low functional status, and concomitant prednisolone treatment were negative predictors of a clinical response and remission. Infliximab had the lowest rates of treatment response, disease remission, and drug adherence, adalimumab had the highest rates of treatment response and disease remission, and etanercept had the longest drug survival rates. These findings were consistent after correction for confounders and sensitivity analyses and across outcome measures and followup times.
PubMed ID
20039405 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification of cutpoints for acceptable health status and important improvement in patient-reported outcomes, in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98675
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Jan;37(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Maria Knoph Kvamme
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Elisabeth Lie
Tore Kristian Kvien
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Institute of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Norway. m.k.kvamme@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Jan;37(1):26-31
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify cutpoints reflecting Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS) and Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) in patient-reported multi-attribute health status classification systems and health status measurements among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: We identified patients with RA, AS, and PsA from the Norwegian disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) register (NOR-DMARD). The patients (n = 4225) had started with DMARD and responded to the PASS and MCII anchoring questions at the 3-month followup examination. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves with 80% specificity and the 75th percentile approach were used to identify PASS and MCII cutpoints in the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and the Short-Form-6 Dimensions (SF-6D) indexes, but also in other patient-reported outcomes (joint pain and patient global visual analog scale and Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire). RESULTS: The PASS cutpoints estimated with 80% specificity were around 0.70 in EQ-5D in all diseases and around 0.65 in SF-6D. The cutpoints were around 0.65 and 0.60, respectively, when the 75th percentile approach was used. The MCII cutpoints assessed by 80% specificity varied from 0.10 to 0.19 in EQ-5D and from 0.07 to 0.10 in SF-6D. CONCLUSION: The cutpoints for PASS in EQ-5D and SF-6D indicate that PASS corresponds to a health-related quality of life that is far from perfect health. Somewhat different cutpoints were identified for both PASS and MCII with 80% specificity versus the 75th percentile method.
PubMed ID
19955045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sex differences in response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in early and established rheumatoid arthritis -- results from the DANBIO registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129589
Source
J Rheumatol. 2012 Jan;39(1):46-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Damini Jawaheer
Jørn Olsen
Merete Lund Hetland
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI), 5700 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Oakland, CA 94609-1609, USA. Djawaheer@chori.org
Source
J Rheumatol. 2012 Jan;39(1):46-53
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Denmark
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Characteristics
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
To investigate sex differences in response to anti-tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) therapy over time in early versus established rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Patients with RA who initiated anti-TNF therapy between January 2003 and June 2008 in Denmark were selected from the DANBIO Registry. Sex differences in baseline disease features were examined using chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests, and t tests. Using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model for repeated measures, we examined European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) responses in men and women over 48 months of followup, adjusting for baseline values of age, 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), disease duration, and anti-TNF, methotrexate, and prednisolone use.
At initiation of anti-TNF therapy (baseline), 328 women and 148 men had early RA (= 2 yrs), and 1245 women and 408 men had established RA (> 2 yrs). In both early and established RA, men and women had active disease with similar DAS28 scores (mean ± SD 5.2 ± 1.1), physician global scores, swollen joint counts, and radiographic changes. In early RA, men were significantly more likely to achieve a EULAR good/moderate response over 48 months compared to women (GEE; p = 0.003), and a significant interaction between sex and followup time (GEE; p
Notes
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Jun;1069:212-2216855148
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2006 Dec;45(12):1558-6516705046
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jan 15;59(1):32-4118163417
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Aug;34(8):1670-317611987
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2007 Jan;66(1):46-5217158139
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2008 Apr;47(4):507-1318304941
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 Jul;67(7):1052-318556449
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Sep;58(9):2642-5118759292
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2009 Mar;36(3):508-1119208610
Cites: Arthritis Res Ther. 2009;11(1):R719144159
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Jan;69(1):230-319158113
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Sep;69(9):1580-820699241
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2010 Dec;37(12):2475-8520889597
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jan;50(1):69-7721148154
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2001 Aug;28(8):1809-1611508583
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2004 Feb;31(2):214-2214760787
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Dec;34(12):2382-717985407
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Dec;56(12):3928-3918050208
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1988 Mar;31(3):315-243358796
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1995 Jan;38(1):44-87818570
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 31;352(13):1293-30415753114
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1998 Oct;41(10):1845-509778226
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1996 Jan;39(1):34-408546736
PubMed ID
22089458 View in PubMed
Less detail