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Composite Measures in Psoriatic Arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2009 annual meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101828
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Mar;38(3):540-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Philip S Helliwell
Oliver Fitzgerald
C Vibeke Strand
Philip J Mease
Author Affiliation
University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Mar;38(3):540-5
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Congresses as topic
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A composite measure is one way of incorporating an assessment of all relevant clinical outcomes into one single measure. By definition it incorporates several dimensions of disease status often by combining these different domains into a single score. Such instruments are well established in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and these RA-specific measures have successfully been adopted for use in clinical trials involving patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). However, the need for a more PsA-specific composite measure has led to a number of proposals, which, for the large part, incorporate only peripheral articular disease activity. New indices that combine the diverse clinical manifestations of PsA are now under development. These issues were discussed at the 2009 annual meeting of GRAPPA (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis) in Stockholm, Sweden, and are summarized here.
PubMed ID
21362782 View in PubMed
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Identification of cutpoints for acceptable health status and important improvement in patient-reported outcomes, in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98675
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Jan;37(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Maria Knoph Kvamme
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Elisabeth Lie
Tore Kristian Kvien
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Institute of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Norway. m.k.kvamme@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Jan;37(1):26-31
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify cutpoints reflecting Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS) and Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) in patient-reported multi-attribute health status classification systems and health status measurements among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: We identified patients with RA, AS, and PsA from the Norwegian disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) register (NOR-DMARD). The patients (n = 4225) had started with DMARD and responded to the PASS and MCII anchoring questions at the 3-month followup examination. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves with 80% specificity and the 75th percentile approach were used to identify PASS and MCII cutpoints in the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and the Short-Form-6 Dimensions (SF-6D) indexes, but also in other patient-reported outcomes (joint pain and patient global visual analog scale and Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire). RESULTS: The PASS cutpoints estimated with 80% specificity were around 0.70 in EQ-5D in all diseases and around 0.65 in SF-6D. The cutpoints were around 0.65 and 0.60, respectively, when the 75th percentile approach was used. The MCII cutpoints assessed by 80% specificity varied from 0.10 to 0.19 in EQ-5D and from 0.07 to 0.10 in SF-6D. CONCLUSION: The cutpoints for PASS in EQ-5D and SF-6D indicate that PASS corresponds to a health-related quality of life that is far from perfect health. Somewhat different cutpoints were identified for both PASS and MCII with 80% specificity versus the 75th percentile method.
PubMed ID
19955045 View in PubMed
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Responses to adalimumab in patients with active psoriatic arthritis who have not adequately responded to prior therapy: effectiveness and safety results from an open-label study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142466
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Sep;37(9):1898-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Dafna D Gladman
John S Sampalis
Olivier Illouz
Benoît Guérette
Author Affiliation
Toronto Western Research Institute, 399 Bathurst Street, Room 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8, Canada. dafna.gladman@utoronto.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Sep;37(9):1898-906
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Joints - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Skin - pathology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adalimumab in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and an inadequate response to prior therapy.
Patients were treated with subcutaneous injections of adalimumab 40 mg every other week in addition to their standard antirheumatic therapies in a 12-week, open-label study. Effectiveness evaluations at Week 12 included American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) response rates, Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC), active dactylitis, enthesitis, and target lesion assessment. Physical function was evaluated using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI).
A total of 127 patients were enrolled. At Week 12, patients achieved ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 response rates of 78.0%, 55.9%, and 21.3%, respectively. PASI50 and PASI75 response rates were 64.7% and 47.1%. A PsARC response was experienced by 70.1% of patients. Between baseline and Week 12, clinically and statistically significant reductions occurred in the mean total plaque score of the target lesion as well as in the percentages of patients with active dactylitis and enthesitis. A mean improvement in HAQ-DI was also observed (-0.44; p
PubMed ID
20595284 View in PubMed
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