Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2173 records – page 1 of 218.

[3',5'-cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the combined treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14188
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Aug;(6):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
O I Bakaliuk
M I Shved
M V Hrebenyk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Aug;(6):34-7
Date
Aug-1998
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3',5'-Cyclic-Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase - antagonists & inhibitors
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - immunology - metabolism
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase - blood - drug effects
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - drug effects
Immunity, Natural - drug effects
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Papaverine - therapeutic use
Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prospidium - therapeutic use
Abstract
A study was made of clinical effectiveness and mechanism of action of the inhibitor of the specific 3',5'-cAMP phosphodiesterase papaverine in a therapeutic complex of measures designed to treat RA patients involving an immunodepressive preparation free from any cytopenic effect prospidin as a basic mediator. It has been shown that the papaverine antiarthritic action is associated with its positive effects on the unspecific component of the immune-complex inflammation, viz. processes of lipid peroxidation, activity of the antioxidant system of defence as well as on the vascular tone and microcirculation. All this improves tissue metabolism, and in this way enhances efficiency of RA basic therapy.
PubMed ID
9844866 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124008
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;41(5):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
L. Bertilsson
B. Andersson-Gäre
A. Fasth
H. Forsblad-d'Elia
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. lennart.bertilsson2@comhem.se
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;41(5):379-82
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Arthritis, Juvenile - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Uveitis - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years.
This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used.
During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. CONCLUSION. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
22639832 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10 year follow up of parenteral gold therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14307
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
G. Bendix
A. Bjelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Tolerance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the long term tolerance of parenteral gold and subsequent drug treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including prediction of outcome and 'survival' of sequential treatments. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 376 patients was made, including a detailed screening of 237 patients treated in 1989. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were analysed in life table analyses, which were used to compare patients receiving parenteral gold treatment in 1985 and 1989, and two groups of patients receiving disease modifying antirheumatic drugs after parenteral gold treatment. The causes of discontinuation were followed in sequential treatments. RESULTS: The estimated probability of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment was 29% after six months and 42%, 55%, 74%, and 92% after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Mucocutaneous side effects were the main cause of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment during the first three years, while the probability of discontinuation because of inefficacy dominated after four years. Side effects also constituted the main cause of discontinuation of treatments given after parenteral gold treatment during the first three years of follow up. No significant differences were found when comparing the termination rates between the first and the second and subsequent treatments after parenteral gold treatment. The main reasons for discontinuing one treatment could not predict the cause of discontinuation of the next treatment. CONCLUSION: Mucocutaneous side effects dominated initially, while inefficacy was the dominating cause of discontinuation of long term parenteral gold treatment. No serious side effects were registered. The cause of discontinuation of one treatment did not predict the cause of discontinuation of the following drug. Drug 'survival' was the same in both treatments after parenteral gold treatment.
PubMed ID
8712879 View in PubMed
Less detail

17-year follow-up of symptoms and signs in the knee joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14565
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(5):325-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Isacson
E. Allander
L A Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(5):325-31
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Knee Joint - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - analysis
Abstract
A population survey was carried out in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1967. In a sample of 15,268 individuals, 239 were found to have rheumatoid arthritis according to the New York diagnostic criteria. In 1983, i.e. 17 years later, 109 of the 127 individuals still living were reexamined. Among these, 79 complained of knee symptoms and 30 stated that the knee was the joint that presented the greatest hindrance to walking. Fifty-nine found difficulty in walking up or down stairs and 47 had to use a walking aid. These shortcomings were more often noted in the knees that had been swollen, or painful, 17 years previously. In addition, at follow-up, narrowing of the articular space was observed in the knees that were swollen and painful. Valgus deformity was associated with swelling, while varus deformity also involved, apart from the swelling, pain and restricted motility. In all, 108 operations were performed on 48 of the 109 subjects who were re-examined; 12 of these were knee operations.
PubMed ID
3212404 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 year follow-up of the Aland thyroid study of 1956. Thyroid status and incidence of rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242498
Source
Acta Endocrinol Suppl (Copenh). 1983;251:47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
P. Wahlberg
D. Nyman
S A Carlsson
Source
Acta Endocrinol Suppl (Copenh). 1983;251:47-52
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Goiter - epidemiology
Goiter, Endemic - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperthyroidism - epidemiology
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
In 1956, a study of the iodine metabolism in endemic goitre was made on a group of inhabitants of the Aland Islands, an autonomous province of Finland. The number of Alanders studied was 130. In a follow-up study 25 years later, 101 still living subjects from the original study could be traced. 17 of them had become hyperthyroid, 7 had been operated on for non-toxic goitre, and 4 had become hypothyroid. There was no correlation between thyroid hormone excretion values in 1956 and subsequent hyperthyroidism. Rheumatoid arthritis was overrepresented in the goitre group compared with the group without goitres, as well as compared with statistical figures on the frequency of rheumatic disease among the population in general of Aland and of Finland as a whole.
PubMed ID
6573099 View in PubMed
Less detail

28-Joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137343
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Eva Hallert
Magnus Husberg
Thomas Skogh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. eva.hallert@liu.se
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To explore possible association between disease activity at 3-month follow-up after RA diagnosis and costs over the following 4 years.
Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (= 1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates.
Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of = 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 = 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28
PubMed ID
21292734 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 30-year result of deforming arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165614
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2007 Jul;27(9):881-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Kalevi Kaarela
Kari Laiho
Irma Soini
Author Affiliation
Department of Musculoskeletal Medicine, Tampere University Medical School and Rheumatism Foundation Hospital, 18120 Heinola, Finland. kalevi.kaarela@reuma.fi
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2007 Jul;27(9):881-2
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Antibodies, Antinuclear - analysis - blood - immunology
Arthritis - diagnosis - immunology - physiopathology
Arthrography
Autoantibodies - analysis
DNA - immunology
Disease Progression
Female
Finland
Foot - pathology - radiography
Hand - pathology - radiography
Humans
Joints - immunology - pathology - physiopathology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - immunology - physiopathology
Serotyping
Time Factors
Abstract
Symmetric non-erosive polyarthritis is the most common clinical feature in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report on a 42-year follow-up of a 71-year-old woman who first had polyarthritis in 1963 at the age of 29 and continuously since 1975. SLE was diagnosed in 2000 at the age of 66 as anti-dsDNA (56 kIU/l), and antinuclear antibodies (1:2,560) turned positive. In 2005 hand and feet radiographs revealed severe Jaccoud's arthritis with subluxations but without erosions.
PubMed ID
17225923 View in PubMed
Less detail

2007 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88236
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arthritis
Asthma
Binge drinking
Cardiovascular disease
Chronic Disease
Diabetes
Health care coverage
Nutrition and physical activity
Overweight/Obese
Premature death
Quality of Life
Tobacco use
Abstract
Modification of risk behaviors that contribute to chronic disease,premature death and impaired quality of life is an important public health challenge. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) collects information on risk factors, chronic disease prevalence and preventive practices that is essential for the development of chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts aimed at modifying key risk factors. The Stateof Alaska began surveillance using the BRFSS in 1991 and has continued yearly since. The Alaska BRFSS is a collaborative project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Alaska Division of Public Health.
Less detail

Abatacept as add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171770
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2005 Sep;(73):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Allison
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2005 Sep;(73):1-4
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - drug therapy
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Drug Approval
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Immunoconjugates - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Immunologic Factors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Abatacept is a co-stimulation blocker that inhibits T-cell activation and interrupts the process leading to inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with severe arthritis who took abatacept with at least one other disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in six and 12-month clinical trials demonstrated statistically significant improvement in tender, swollen joints and other clinical measures compared with placebo. Mild to moderate adverse events included headache, nasopharyngitis, hypertension and back pain. The adverse events were similar to those seen in placebo groups. Abatacept should not be used in combination with other biologic agents because of reported increased rates of serious adverse events, including serious infections. With its different mechanism of action, abatacept may be an alternative add-on therapy for patients with an inadequate response to other arthritis therapies.
PubMed ID
16317826 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abatacept in rheumatoid arthritis: survival on drug, clinical outcomes, and their predictors-data from a large national quality register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307208
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2020 01 22; 22(1):15
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-22-2020
Author
Giovanni Cagnotto
Minna Willim
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Michele Compagno
Lennart T H Jacobsson
Saedis Saevarsdottir
Carl Turesson
Author Affiliation
Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. giovanni.cagnotto@med.lu.se.
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2020 01 22; 22(1):15
Date
01-22-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Abatacept - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited data regarding efficacy of abatacept treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) outside clinical trials. Quality registers have been useful for observational studies on tumor necrosis factor inhibition in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical efficacy and tolerability of abatacept in RA, using a national register.
RA patients that started abatacept between 2006 and 2017 and were included in the Swedish Rheumatology Quality register (N?=?2716) were investigated. Survival on drug was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) good response and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) response (improvement of =?0.3) rates (LUNDEX corrected for drug survival) at 6 and at 12?months were assessed. Predictors of discontinuation were investigated by Cox regression analyses, and predictors of clinical response by logistic regression. Significance-based backward stepwise selection of variables was used for the final multivariate models.
There was a significant difference in drug survival by previous biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) exposure (p?
PubMed ID
31969172 View in PubMed
Less detail

2173 records – page 1 of 218.