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63 records – page 1 of 7.

[Acute intermittent porphyria. Risk of secondary hypertension--needs follow-up!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215335
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Apr 19;92(16):1685-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-1995

Acute myocardial infarction--progress in primary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109197
Source
Br Heart J. 1971;33:Suppl:145-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971
Author
J. Stamler
Source
Br Heart J. 1971;33:Suppl:145-64
Date
1971
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arteriosclerosis - etiology
Asia
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
Death, Sudden
Diet, Atherogenic
Dietary Fats
Electrocardiography
Europe
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Obesity - complications
Physical Exertion
Rabbits
Smoking - complications - prevention & control
United States
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1968 Apr;21(4):255-765652949
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1968 Aug;44(8):936-495243889
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1969 Nov;24(5):659-655347939
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1969 Dec;45(12):1306-255261246
Cites: Lancet. 1970 Feb 28;1(7644):473-44189785
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1970 May;49(5):1007-155441536
Cites: Circ Res. 1970 Jul;27(1):59-674987450
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1962 May;109:566-7214452187
Cites: Circulation. 1963 Jul;28:20-3113941964
Cites: Arch Pathol. 1963 Oct;76:404-1214054162
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1964 Oct;17:933-4914213425
Cites: Lancet. 1960 Jan 23;1(7117):196-813839984
PubMed ID
4929436 View in PubMed
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Alaskan arctic Eskimo: responses to a customary high fat diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1141
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1972 Aug; 25(8):737-745.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
K J Ho
B. Mikkelson
L A Lewis
S A Feldman
C B Taylor
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1972 Aug; 25(8):737-745.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Diet, traditional
Ischemic heart disease
Fatty acids
Adolescent
Adult
Africa
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Arteriosclerosis - etiology
Child
Cholesterol - blood - metabolism
Dietary Fats
Ethnic Groups
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Homeostasis
Humans
Inuits
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition
Triglycerides - blood
United States
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1147.
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Alcohol consumption and coronary atherosclerosis progression--the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Angiographic Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9388
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2004 Oct;176(2):311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Imre Janszky
Kenneth J Mukamal
Kristina Orth-Gomér
Anders Romelsjö
Karin Schenck-Gustafsson
Bertil Svane
Richard L Kirkeeide
Murray A Mittleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Thoracic Division, Box 220, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2004 Oct;176(2):311-9
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Angina Pectoris
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of alcohol intake with progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Although moderate drinkers have a lower risk of coronary heart disease than abstainers, the relation of alcohol use and coronary atherosclerosis has not been well studied. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Angiographic Study, we evaluated 103 women, aged 65 years or younger, hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris who underwent serial quantitative coronary angiography 3-6 months following their index event and repeated an average of 3 years and 3 months (range 2-5 years) later. Individual alcoholic beverage consumption was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. We used mixed model analysis to estimate the effect of alcohol consumption on progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by mean luminal diameter change, controlling for age, smoking, body-mass index, education, physical activity, index cardiac event, menopausal status, diabetes, and history of dyslipidemia. Of the 93 women with complete information on alcohol intake, 14 consumed no alcohol (abstainers), 55 consumed up to 5 g of alcohol per day (light drinkers), and 24 consumed more than 5 g of alcohol per day (moderate drinkers). Coronary atherosclerosis progressed by a multivariate-adjusted average of 0.138 mm (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.027-0.249) among abstainers, 0.137 mm (95% CI: 0.057-0.217) among light drinkers, and -0.054 mm (95% CI: -0.154 to 0.047) among moderate drinkers (P
PubMed ID
15380454 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein E polymorphism affects carotid artery atherosclerosis in smoking hypertensive men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67351
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Dec;20(12):2371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Jarkko Karvonen
Heikki Kauma
Kari Kervinen
Olavi Ukkola
Maire Rantala
Markku Päivänsalo
Markku J Savolainen
Y Antero Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, FIN-90014, Finland. jakarvon@paju.oulu.fi
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Dec;20(12):2371-8
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Carotid Artery Diseases - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heterozygote
Humans
Hypertension - genetics - ultrasonography
Intracranial Arteriosclerosis - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking is a risk factor for increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). The apolipoprotein E (apoE) 4 allele has been associated with cardiovascular diseases, but the role of apoE in regard to intima-media thickness (IMT) has remained controversial. The objective was to investigate whether there is some gene-environment interaction between smoking and apoE polymorphism.DESIGN Cross-sectional case-control study. METHODS: IMTs of 511 hypertensive and control men were measured ultrasonographically and the apoE genotypes were determined. Genotypes with the 4 allele were pooled into one group and the genotypes without it into another. RESULTS: A significant interaction between the 4 allele and smoking affecting IMT was observed among the hypertensive smokers, as assessed by analysis of covariance. The mean carotid IMT was significantly greater (1.01 versus 0.90 mm, P = 0.003) in the 4 carriers than in the subjects without 4 among the hypertensive smokers. The number of plaques was also significantly higher. No differences were found in the other subjects (hypertensive non-smokers or controls). Linear regression analysis indicated that the 4 allele was an independent determinant of IMT in the hypertensive smokers but not in the other subjects. The estimated average effect of the 4 allele on the mean IMT in the hypertensive smokers was 0.088 mm (P
Notes
Comment In: J Hypertens. 2002 Dec;20(12):2327-912473848
PubMed ID
12473860 View in PubMed
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Atherogenesis. An epidemiological model based on the presence of unnatural trans and cis isomers of unsaturated fatty acids in the maternal diet and in mothers milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60175
Source
Med Hypotheses. 1986 Nov;21(3):323-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
J. Booyens
Source
Med Hypotheses. 1986 Nov;21(3):323-33
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arteriosclerosis - etiology - prevention & control
Cell Division - drug effects
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - analysis
Fatty Acid Desaturases - antagonists & inhibitors
Fatty Acids, Essential - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Meat - analysis
Milk, Human - analysis
Muscle, Smooth - drug effects
Plant Oils - analysis
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
The hypothesis that the presence of unnatural trans and cis isomers of unsaturated fatty acids in the maternal diet and in human mothers milk could be responsible for initiating atherosclerosis in utero or in infants is proposed. It is suggested that the key etiological factor involved in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques could be uncontrolled division of smooth muscle cells of the intima resulting from the intracellular excess of linoleic acid and deficiency of its metabolites gamma-linolenic acid and dihomogamma-linolenic acid. This imbalance is brought about by competitive inhibition of the enzyme delta-6-desaturase by unnatural trans and cis unsaturated fatty acids. Delta-6-desaturase is the enzyme responsible for converting linoleic acid to dihomogamma-linolenic acid. The cellular presence of unnatural trans and cis isomers of unsaturated fatty acids would therefore enhance increased levels of linoleic acid and deficiency of its metabolites gamma-linolenic acid and dihomogamma-linolenic acid. It is proposed that prophylaxis against the effects of delta-6-desaturase inhibition could be achieved by the adoption of an Eskimo-like diet containing the essential fatty acid metabolites gamma-linolenic acid and/or dihomogamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid per se in high concentrations.
PubMed ID
3642201 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and adolescents. VIII. Food consumption and nutrient intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239577
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:135-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
L. Räsänen
M. Ahola
R. Kara
M. Uhari
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:135-53
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Arteriosclerosis - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Risk
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A dietary survey was conducted in 1980 in connection with the Multicentre Study on Atherosclerosis Precursors in Finnish Children in five urban and 12 rural communes in various parts of Finland. 1,768 children aged 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 years were interviewed using the 48 hour recall method. Food consumption, and the intakes of energy and 49 nutrients were calculated. The intakes of energy and most nutrients increased in the successive age groups until the age of 15 years. There were only small differences in the diet of children belonging to different social classes. Protein accounted for 14% of total energy intake, fat for 38%, total carbohydrate for 48%, and sucrose for 10%. The ratio of polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the diet (P/S) was 0.24 for the whole material, which is higher than found in previous studies in Finland. The P/S ratio was higher in urban areas and West Finland than in rural areas and in East Finland. The share of fat of energy intake exceeded the recommendation given by the Ministry of Health and the P/S ratio was lower than recommended. The mean daily intakes of energy and vitamins met the recommendations. Of the mineral elements, the intakes of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and manganese were abundant. The intakes of iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum and chromium were lower than recommended in most age groups and the intakes of selenium and fluorine in all age groups. The large share of refined foods in the children's diet was the main reason for the low nutrient densities.
PubMed ID
3867223 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular disease and omega-3 fatty acids]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3187
Source
Minerva Med. 1997 Sep;88(9):343-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
E. Ponte
D. Cafagna
M. Balbi
Author Affiliation
Cattedra di Angiologia, Università degli Studi, Trieste.
Source
Minerva Med. 1997 Sep;88(9):343-53
Date
Sep-1997
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Arteriosclerosis - etiology - metabolism - therapy
Blood Vessels - physiology
Diabetes Mellitus - etiology - metabolism
English Abstract
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - etiology - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Platelet Adhesiveness
Vasodilation
Abstract
Fish oil is rich in the long chain omega-3 (omega-3) polyinsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), Pioneering studies of Dyerberg and Bang primarily originate interests in this way. The low incidence of acute myocardial infarction they verified within the Greenland Eskimos suggested that a high dietary omega-3 PUFA intake due to marine food might protect against coronary heart disease. They showed that the Eskimos had a beneficial lipid pattern and that their balance between pro-aggregatory thromboxanes and anti-aggregatory prostacyclins was shifted towards an anti-thrombotic state. The two major omega-3 fatty acids are decosapentaenoic acid (EPA C 20:5, omega 3), with five double bonds, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA C 22:6, omega 3), with six double bonds. These fatty acids' significant effects include reduction of plasma triglycerides and lipoprotein levels as well as of platelets thrombogenicity in the microcirculation, which is due to effects on the mediators production derived from arachidonic acid (prostaglandins and leucotrienes), meddling in inflammatory and immune cell function, retarded atherosclerosis development. Experimental studies of atherogenesis and arterial thrombogenesis support the hypothesis that dietary omega-3 PUFA intake may play a leading role in primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.
PubMed ID
9411311 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors in Finnish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239556
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1985;318:5-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985

63 records – page 1 of 7.