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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Cardiac arrhythmias and risk stratification after myocardial infarction: results of the CARISMA pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53562
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2003 Jan;26(1 Pt 2):416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Heikki V Huikuri
Véronique Mahaux
Poul-Erik Bloch-Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Kajaanintie 50, FIN-90220, OULU Finland. heikki.huikuri@oulu.fi
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2003 Jan;26(1 Pt 2):416-9
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Female
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - physiopathology
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Stroke Volume
Abstract
CARISMA is a multicenter study enrolling patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction
PubMed ID
12687857 View in PubMed
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Electrocardiographic changes by accidental hypothermia in an urban and a tropical region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80299
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2007 Jan;40(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
de Souza Dilma
Riera Andrés Ricardo Pérez
Bombig Maria Teresa
Francisco Yoná Afonso
Brollo Luigi
Filho Bráulio Luna
Dubner Sergio
Schapachnik Edgardo
Povoa Rui
Author Affiliation
Escola Paulista de Medicina, UNIFESP, São Paulo CEP, Brazil.
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2007 Jan;40(1):47-52
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Cities
Critical Care - methods
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Hypothermia - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Tropical Climate - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is defined as a condition in which core temperature (rectal, esophageal, or tympanic) reaches values below 35 degrees C. This may be accidental, metabolic, or therapeutic. The accidental form is frequent in cold-climate countries and rare in those with tropical or subtropical climate. The aim of this study was to evaluate electrocardiographic changes of patients with accidental hypothermia. METHODS: In 59 patients with hypothermia, the following electrocardiogram parameters were analyzed: rhythm and heart rate (HR), P-wave characteristics, PR-interval duration, QRS-complex duration, presence of J wave and its location characteristics, polarity, voltage, aspect and its correlation with the degree of hypothermia, changes in T wave regarding its polarity and characteristics, duration of the QT interval corrected for HR using both Bazett and Friderica formulas, and possible presence of both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias were independently and blindly analyzed in the tracings by experienced cardiologists. RESULTS: In 6 patients, electrocardiogram was normal. Sinus bradycardia was observed in 52.5% of the patients. J wave was present in 51 patients, and its voltage correlated inversely and was statistically significantly with the core temperature. Changes in T wave were observed in 47.4% of the cases. QT interval, adjusted for HR, was prolonged in 72.8% of the cases. Idioventricular rhythm was found in 6 cases, total atrioventricular block in 3 cases, and junctional rhythm and atrial fibrillation in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Electrocardiogram changes in accidental hypothermia are frequent and characteristic for this entity improving diagnosis in usually unconscious patients, and in many cases, it may be the diagnostic clue in patients with conscience deficit in emergency units, even in patients from a tropical climate where the population at risk may be exposed to temperatures below 20 degrees C.
PubMed ID
17027018 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of dysrhythmia in children with muscular dystrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32439
Source
Angiology. 2000 Nov;51(11):925-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
D. Oguz
R. Olguntürk
F S Tunaoglu
K. Gücüyener
G. Köse
M. Unlü
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara. Turkey. doguz@ato.org.tr
Source
Angiology. 2000 Nov;51(11):925-31
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Muscular Dystrophies - complications - physiopathology
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left
Abstract
Myocardial involvement and dysrhythmia are common findings with muscular dystrophy and are among the leading causes of death. The authors evaluated rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with muscular dystrophy by electrocardiography, signal-averaged electrocardiography, and Holter monitoring. Twenty-nine patients (mean age, 8 years) and 29 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Sixty-two percent of patients had electrocardiographic abnormalities defined as deep Q waves in V6, tall R waves in V1, and QRS axis deviation. The cardiomyopathy index was significantly greater in the patient group whereas QT and QTc dispersion values showed no significant difference. Holter monitoring revealed premature atrial and ventricular contractions more frequently than normal. However all were classified as Lown I and II. Mean heart rate was significantly higher in the patient group. The electrocardiograms of 41% of the patients showed late potentials. No relationship with these changes and cardiac function was observed. During the study, one patient died whose cardiomyopathy index was longer and had late potentials detected with signal-averaged electrocardiography. In conclusion, standard electrocardiography, cardiomyopathy index, signal-averaged electrocardiography, and Holter monitoring are valuable and reliable monitoring methods in children with muscular dystrophy.
PubMed ID
11103861 View in PubMed
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Prediction of sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction in the beta-blocking era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53500
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Aug 20;42(4):652-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2003
Author
Heikki V Huikuri
Jari M Tapanainen
Kai Lindgren
Pekka Raatikainen
Timo H Mäkikallio
K E Juhani Airaksinen
Robert J Myerburg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. heikki.huikuri@oulu.fi
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Aug 20;42(4):652-8
Date
Aug-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - etiology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - etiology
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the predictive power of arrhythmia risk markers after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). BACKGROUND: Several risk variables have been suggested to predict the occurrence of sudden cardiac death (SCD), but the utility of these variables has not been well established among patients using medical therapy according to contemporary guidelines. METHODS: A consecutive series of 700 patients with AMI was studied. The end points were total mortality, SCD, and nonsudden cardiac death (non-SCD). Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT), ejection fraction (EF), heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, signal-averaged electrocardiogram (SAECG), QT dispersion, and QRS duration were analyzed (n = 675). Beta-blocking therapy was used by 97% of the patients at discharge and by 95% at one and two years after AMI. RESULTS: During a mean (+/-SD) follow-up of 43 +/- 15 months, 37 non-SCDs (5.5%) and 22 SCDs (3.2%) occurred. All arrhythmia risk variables differed between the survivors and those with non-SCD (e.g., the standard deviation of N-N intervals was 98 +/- 32 vs. 74 +/- 21 ms [p
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Aug 20;42(4):659-6012932597
PubMed ID
12932596 View in PubMed
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Ventricular late potentials in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76253
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2006 Jan;39(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Rolf Hörnsten
Urban Wiklund
Ole B Suhr
Steen M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Physiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. rolf.hornsten@vll.se
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2006 Jan;39(1):57-62
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial - complications - physiopathology
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - etiology
Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Abstract
We investigated the occurrence of ventricular late potentials (LPs) in patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) and the possible association with ventricular arrhythmia on Holter electrocardiography and echocardiographic data. Fifty-five patients and 94 healthy controls were studied. LP were found in 46% of the FAP patients older than 60 years and in 15% of the controls (P = .02), whereas no difference was found in individuals younger than 60 years. The occurrence of LP was associated with nonsustained ventricular arrhythmia in the older FAP patients (P = .04). Older patients with LP had increased ventricular septum thickness (P = .02) and left posterior wall thickness (P = .01), as compared with those without LP. In conclusion, ventricular LPs are common in the FAP patients older than 60 years and associated with nonsustained ventricular arrhythmia and increased thickness of the left ventricular wall. Long-term follow-up studies are required to find the prognostic significance of these new findings.
PubMed ID
16387053 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.