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A population-based survey of beliefs about neck pain from whiplash injury, work-related neck pain, and work-related upper extremity pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157091
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Mar;13(3):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Geoff P Bostick
Robert Ferrari
Linda J Carroll
Anthony S Russell
Rachelle Buchbinder
Donald Krawciw
Douglas P Gross
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. bostick@ualberta.ca
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Mar;13(3):300-4
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arm Injuries - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Illness Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - etiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - complications - psychology
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
Beliefs about pain conditions appear to influence recovery in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Little is known about population beliefs about neck and arm pain.
To evaluate population beliefs of three common musculoskeletal conditions: work-related neck and arm pain and whiplash injury (WAD).
Mail-out surveys were delivered to 2000 adult residents of two Canadian provinces cross-sectionally. To evaluate beliefs about the three conditions, the back beliefs questionnaire was modified yielding three comparable 10-item measures. In addition, we inquired about the belief about how quickly the condition settles. Respondents indicated their level of agreement on a 5-point Likert scale with lower scores interpreted as negative or pessimistic. Overall and item specific descriptive statistics are reported. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed to compare beliefs across conditions.
Three hundred (15%) surveys were returned. Overall belief scores were different across conditions (p
PubMed ID
18492612 View in PubMed
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