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[Accidents affecting potato harvesters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220265
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Sep 27;155(39):3131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-27-1993
Author
J U Hansen
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Odense Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Sep 27;155(39):3131-2
Date
Sep-27-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Arm Injuries - etiology - prevention & control - surgery
Denmark
Hand Injuries - etiology - prevention & control - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
During industrialization in agriculture, many farming machines have been introduced. It is well-known that farming is a dangerous workplace and that farm machinery cause many serious accidents every year. Four cases of accidents with potato harvesters are discussed. In three of four cases the farmers were injured while cleaning the machine without stopping it, which probably was the main cause of the accidents. Farmers are in general not careful enough when using farm machinery. Every year, farmers in Denmark are severely invalided in accidents with potato harvesters. A strategy to lower the accidents is proposed: 1. Information of farmers, farmer schools, machine constructors and importers about mechanisms of injury. 2. A better education of farmers in using potato harvesters (and other farming machines). 3. Better fencing of the potato harvesters. 4. If possibly constructional changes in the potato harvesters so things will not get stuck, or so that the machine will stop if things stuck. 5. Installation of switches on potato harvesters, which can be reached from all positions, stopping the machines immediately, or a remote switch control carried by the farmer.
PubMed ID
8212405 View in PubMed
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A population-based survey of beliefs about neck pain from whiplash injury, work-related neck pain, and work-related upper extremity pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157091
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Mar;13(3):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Geoff P Bostick
Robert Ferrari
Linda J Carroll
Anthony S Russell
Rachelle Buchbinder
Donald Krawciw
Douglas P Gross
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. bostick@ualberta.ca
Source
Eur J Pain. 2009 Mar;13(3):300-4
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arm Injuries - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Illness Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - etiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - complications - psychology
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Whiplash Injuries - complications - psychology
Abstract
Beliefs about pain conditions appear to influence recovery in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Little is known about population beliefs about neck and arm pain.
To evaluate population beliefs of three common musculoskeletal conditions: work-related neck and arm pain and whiplash injury (WAD).
Mail-out surveys were delivered to 2000 adult residents of two Canadian provinces cross-sectionally. To evaluate beliefs about the three conditions, the back beliefs questionnaire was modified yielding three comparable 10-item measures. In addition, we inquired about the belief about how quickly the condition settles. Respondents indicated their level of agreement on a 5-point Likert scale with lower scores interpreted as negative or pessimistic. Overall and item specific descriptive statistics are reported. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed to compare beliefs across conditions.
Three hundred (15%) surveys were returned. Overall belief scores were different across conditions (p
PubMed ID
18492612 View in PubMed
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The Tromsø Study: body height, body mass index and fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203653
Source
Osteoporos Int. 1998;8(5):436-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R M Joakimsen
V. Fønnebø
J H Magnus
A. Tollan
A J Søgaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. ragnar.Joakimsen@ism.uit.no
Source
Osteoporos Int. 1998;8(5):436-42
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arm Injuries - etiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - etiology
Humans
Leg Injuries - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
Tall persons suffer more hip fractures than shorter persons, and high body mass index is associated with fewer hip and forearm fractures. We have studied the association between body height, body mass index and all non-vertebral fractures in a large, prospective, population-based study. The middle-aged population of Tromsø, Norway, was invited to surveys in 1979/80, 1986/87 and 1994/95 (The Tromsø Study). Of 16,676 invited to the first two surveys, 12,270 attended both times (74%). Height and weight were measured without shoes at the surveys, and all non-vertebral fractures in the period 1988-1995 were registered (922 persons with fractures) and verified by radiography. The risk of a low-energy fracture was found to be positively associated with increasing body height and with decreasing body mass index. Furthermore, men who had gained weight had a lower risk of hip fractures, and women who had gained weight had a lower risk of fractures in the lower extremities. High body height is thus a risk factor for fractures, and 1 in 4 low-energy fractures among women today might be ascribed to the increase in average stature since the turn of the century. Low body mass index is associated with a higher risk of fractures, but the association is probably too weak to have any clinical relevance in this age category.
PubMed ID
9850351 View in PubMed
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