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Studies on the helminth fauna of Alaska. XXVI. Some observations on the cold-resistance of eggs of Echinococcus sibiricensis Rausch and Schiller, 1954

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99660
Source
Journal of Parasitology. 1955 Dec;41(6):578-582
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1955
Author
Schiller, EL
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Journal of Parasitology. 1955 Dec;41(6):578-582
Date
Dec-1955
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alveolar hydatidosis
Arctic fox
Cestode
Echinococcus sibiricensis
Parasitic disease
St. Lawrence Island
Abstract
A preliminary experiment was conducted using eggs of E. sibiricensis obtained at the routine autopsy of a series of foxes, Alopex lagopus, collected on St. Lawrence Island during December 1953. These carcasses had been frozen by exposure to outdoor temperatures prior to shipment from the island and, during a delay en route at Nome, Alaska, had been exposed to temperatures as low as -40° C. After arrival at Anchorage, the carcasses were stored outside the laboratory for 6 weeks before the examination was undertaken. During this period the temperature ranged from 5° C. to -37° C. At the time of the autopsies, the carcasses were allowed to thaw for about 12 hours at room temperature. Gravid proglottids of E. sibiricensis, obtained from each of 3 carcasses, were fed separately to 3 field voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus. Examination of these voles at the end of 2 weeks disclosed that all harbored alveolar larvae of E. sibiricensis. In view of this evidence that eggs of E. sibiricensis can survive prolonged exposure to variable and extreme cold, experimental studies were subsequently conducted under known conditions of temperature and exposure time.
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 930.
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Temporal trends of POPs in arctic foxes from Svalbard in light of a changing climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297159
Source
Arctic University of Norway. Department of Arctic and Marine Biology. v, 31 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2013
Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics (BFE) Department of Arctic and Marine Biology (AMB) Temporal trends of POPs in arctic foxes from Svalbard in light of a changing climate — Martin Solhøi Andersen Master thesis in Northern populations and ecosystems, November 2013
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, Martin Solhøi
Source
Arctic University of Norway. Department of Arctic and Marine Biology. v, 31 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
7288057
Keywords
Svalbard
Arctic fox
Climate change
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Liver
Reindeer
Abstract
The present study investigates concentrations and temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Svalbard, Norway, adjusted for sex, age, body condition, diet, reindeer mortality and sea ice coverage. Number of reindeer carcasses in Adventdalen and sea ice coverage of Isfjorden in the spring preceding the trapping season were used as indexes for climate influenced food availability between years. We analysed liver of 100 foxes from Svalbard, collected in 1997/98, 1998/99, 1999/00, 2001/02, 2002/03, 2003/04 and 2010/11 for concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; PCB -28, -52, -101, -118, -138, -153 and -180), chlordanes (cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane), p-p’-DDT, p-p’-DDE, HCB, mirex and ß-HCH. The POPs found in highest concentrations were oxychlordane, PCB-180 and PCB-153. We found evidence for a temporal decrease in SPCBs (PCB -118, -138, -153, -180), and Schlordanes (trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane) when controlling for possible confounding variables. We also found evidence for an effect of body condition and d13C on the POP concentrations, as thinner foxes and foxes feeding from the marine food web had significantly higher levels of POPs. There was no evidence for effects of sex, age, reindeer mortality and sea ice coverage on the concentrations of POPs, although increased reindeer mortality had a non-significant negative effect on all the POPs analysed. This study shows that correcting for body condition and diet is vital when investigating temporal trends of POPs in biota. It also illustrates some of the difficulties of investigating POP concentrations in an arctic predator living in an environment influenced by climatic variations.
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