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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Chapter 8 (pp. 525-615) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 8 (pp. 525-615) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic ecosystems
Contamination
Environmental measurements
Radioactive waste
Radioactivity
Releases
Abstract
This chapter deals with the assessment of radioactive contamination of the environment, radiation sources and associated radiological consequences within the Arctic. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a balanced appreciation of the nature and risks posed by radionuclides in the Arctic derived from all relevant and known sources. Initially, a simplified explanation of the basis of radiological protection and the procedures for estimating radiological doses and risks is provided. The chapter subsequently deals with doses associated with existing radioactive contamination of the Arctic environment, routine releases from nuclear operations within, and close to, the Arctic, previous accidents in civil and military nuclear activities that result in exposures to Arctic residents, and potential releases from both such installations and the various packages of high-level waste reposing in the environment, such as those dumped in the Kara Sea by the former Soviet Union. This is followed by an evaluation of radiological vulnerability in the Arctic. The chapter ends with conclusions and recommendations.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
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Acidifying pollutants, Arctic haze, and acidification in the Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100836
Source
Chapter 9 (pp. 621-659) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 9 (pp. 621-659) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acidification
Acidifying compounds
Aquatic acidification
Arctic ecosystems
Arctic haze
Atmospheric processes
Concentrations
Deposition
Sources
Terrestrial acidification
Abstract
During the 1970s, it was discovered that even remote parts of the Arctic were influenced by air pollution. Part of this is due to human activities at lower latitudes. There is a strong link between the regional acid deposition problem and the Arctic haze phenomenon, which was first observed in the 1950s and further studied in the mid-1970s. Within the Arctic itself, there are only a few, but significant, sources of acidifying air pollutants: the non-ferrous smelters on the Kola Peninsula and in Norilsk, which have very large emissions of sulfur in particular. Consequently, the areas of greatest concern with respect to acidification in the Arctic are the northern areas of Finland and Norway and the regions in Russia surrounding the large smelter complexes. At the Second Ministerial Conference on the Arctic Environment, Ministers agreed to accord acidification a priority status under AMAP in a subregional context.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
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Source
Chapter 5 of Foundation for Global Action on Persistent Organic Pollutants: A United States Perspective
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
March 2002
. Such a land appears to exist, at least marginally, on the far Arctic shores of Alaska— although even there one may see the approach­ ing shadow. (Rachel Carson, 1962) Risks posed by persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to Arctic ecosystems and human popula­ tions were central to the genesis of the
  1 document  
Author
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Source
Chapter 5 of Foundation for Global Action on Persistent Organic Pollutants: A United States Perspective
Date
March 2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Arctic ecosystems
Atmospheric transport
Contamination
Ecological sensitivity
Human populations
Hydrologic transport
Migratory species
Oceanic currents
Persistent organic pollutants
Physical climate
POPs
Wildlife levels
Abstract
Once, not too long ago and within the living memory of Native Alaskans, the Arctic was a pristine wilderness where POPs were never used and could not be detected in wildlife or humans. But the face of Alaska is changing, with increasing urbanization, industrialization, extractive resource activity, and commercial and social contacts with the global community. Accompanying these changes are concerns that the physical, climatic, and social aspects that make Alaska unique--particularly for the indigenous population--also make this region peculiarly prone to risks from global pollutants.
Documents

GlobalActionOnPOPsTitleTOCch5.pdf

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The impact of artificial and natural radioactivity in the lichen->caribou->human food chain

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96086
Source
Page 279 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
slow recovery time of Arctic ecosystems to fallout contamination. From 1963-1969, radiocesium body-burdens were measured by Health Canada for more than 3000 people representing almost every Arctic community. This was carried out by a combination of urine collections and portable whole-body counting
  1 document  
Author
Bliss, T.
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau 6302D1, Health Canada
Source
Page 279 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aklavik
Arctic ecosystems
Baker Lake
Cesium-137
Fallout contamination
Fort McPherson
Health Canada
Lead-210
Old Crow
Polonium-210
Radiocesium
Radionuclides
Radon emanation from Arctic soils
Rae-Edzo
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 7. Human Biology.
Documents
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Source
Chapter 6 (pp. 183-335) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 6 (pp. 183-335) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Abiotic media
Arctic ecosystems
Bioaccumulation
Biological effects
Biomagnification
Biotic media
Chemical characteristics
Freshwater environments
Marine environments
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Physical characteristics
POP accumulation
Sources
Temporal variation
Terrestrial environments
Toxicology
Abstract
Interest in the presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Arctic aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems arises mainly from concerns that northern and indigenous peoples depending upon traditional food for most of their diet may be adversely affected by chronic exposure to these pollutants. This chapter deals mainly with persistent organochlorine (OC) pollutants as well as organotins.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
Online Resources
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Biomonitoring in Greenland: Human biomarkers of exposure and effects - A short review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96585
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Bonefeld-Jorgensen, EC
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Denmark. ebj@mil.au.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Arctic ecosystem
Arctic populations
Bioaccumulation
Biomarkers
Biomonitoring
Exposure
Generation studies
Genetic polymorphisms
Greenland
Immune system
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Receptor effect studies
Traditional diet
Abstract
CONTEXT: Since 1997 the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) has produced integrated assessment reports on the status of and trends in environmental persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic ecosystem. Three reports on biomonitoring POPs and their health risks for Arctic populations were published in 1998, 2002, and 2009. ISSUE: The present review summarizes data from Greenland on human monitoring of biomarkers of POP exposure and bioaccumulation and the determination of biomarkers for POP effects. The review focuses on hormone disruptive potentials and some genetic sensitivity biomarkers. The overview covers Greenlandic studies from 2000 to 2006. LESSONS LEARNED: The Greenland biomonitoring studies showed general geographical and gender differences of bioaccumulated serum POP levels, which were primarily related to diet and lifestyle. A high intake of traditional Greenlandic diet (eg seal, whale, polar bear, and seabirds) together with smoking caused higher blood concentrations of POPs. The highest POP values were found on the east coast of Greenland. The receptor effect studies showed a general inverse relationship between high serum POP concentration and estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah-receptor (AhR) transactivity; in addition for men in the two West Greenlandic districts, Nuuk and Sisimiut, a trend towards increased induced AR activity was found. An observed trend to an opposite direction between the dioxin-like AhR and ER activity supports the perception of that dioxins exert an antiestrogen effect. In conclusion, the actual mixtures of serum POPs in Greenlandic Inuit have an endocrine disrupting potential. Comparisons between European and Greenlandic male serum POP levels showed significantly higher levels in Inuit; however, in the same study Inuit had significantly lower sperm DNA damage. Further studies are required to elucidate whether the serum POP related effects on hormone receptors and/or AhR are explanatory factors. 'The Arctic dilemma' is that along with the intake of the Greenlandic traditional diet that contains POPs, there are also a number of important nutrients, such as trace elements/antioxidants and marine unsaturated fatty acids which have favorable effects on health. However, a number of studies suggest that an increase in Western food items in the diet can lead to other health risks, such as the metabolic syndrome and its sequels increase in weight, hypertension, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, including breast cancer. To elucidate these aspects further studies are required, including those into biomarkers for exposure and effects, epigenetic contexts and the determination of relevant genetic polymorphisms, case-control as well as generation studies. Finally, there is a need for the development of new biomarkers to study the potential POP effects that inhibit the immune system and affect the development of the central nervous system.
PubMed ID
20572746 View in PubMed
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Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy--Declaration and report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100823
Source
First Ministerial Conference on the Protection of the Arctic Environment, Rovaniemi, Finland, June 14, 1991
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jun-1991
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Council
Source
First Ministerial Conference on the Protection of the Arctic Environment, Rovaniemi, Finland, June 14, 1991
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acidification
Arctic ecosystems
Arctic environment
Arctic indigenous peoples
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP)
Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF)
Emergency prevention, preparedness, and response
Heavy metals
Natural resources
Noise
Oil pollution
Persistent organic contaminants
Radioactivity
Abstract
There is a growing national and international appreciation of the importance of Arctic ecosystems and an increasing knowledge of global pollution and resulting environmental threats. The Arctic is highly sensitive to pollution and much of its human population and culture is directly dependent on the health of the region's ecosystems. Limited sunlight, ice cover that inhibits energy penetration, low mean and extreme temperatures, low species diversity and biological productivity and long-lived organisms with high lipid levels all contribute to the sensitivity of the Arctic ecosystem and cause it to be easily damaged. This vulnerability of the Arctic to pollution requires that action be taken now, or degradation may become irreversible. The governments of the Arctic countries have become increasingly aware of the need for, and their responsibility to combat these threats to the Arctic ecosystem. On the initiative of Finland, the eight Arctic countries of USSR, USA, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Finland, Denmark and Canada have met to prepare a strategy to protect the Arctic environment.
Notes
Print copy available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100823.
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7 records – page 1 of 1.