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[24-hr monitoring arterial pressure in outpatients with cardiovascular risk factors in the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261133
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V B Simonenko
K B Solov'eva
I V Dolbin
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Arterial Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
To study peculiar features of daily AP rhythm and profile in men with cardiovascular risk factors residing in the Far North.
The study included 115 servicemen divided into 3 groups (hypertensive disease (HD), hypertonic type neurocirculatory asthenia (NCA) and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases other than AH). HD was diagnosed based on multiple AP measurements and 24-hr monitoring.
HD was associated with elevated mean AP, load indices and AP variability All patients had pathological type of morning dynamics. Normal daily rhythm of systolic AP (SAP) was documented in 66.1% of the patients with HD and in 68% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. Normal daily rhythm ofdiastolic AP (DAP) was recorded in 63.5% of the patients with HD and in 72% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. In group 2, normal daily rhythms of SAP and DAP were found in 44 and 56% of the cases respectively.
Men residing in the Far North under conditions of anomalous photoperiod need medicamentous correction of AP regardless of AH type. Ambulatory BP monitoring should be preferred for the assessment of the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy.
PubMed ID
25696949 View in PubMed
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Acculturation strategies and ethnic identity as predictors of behavior problems in arctic minority adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5544
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;42(1):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Siv Kvernmo
Sonja Heyerdahl
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Medical Faculty, University of Tromsoe, Norway. sivk@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;42(1):57-65
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Minority Groups - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Social Identification
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of acculturation attitudes and ethnic and national identity on behavior problems in arctic minority adolescents in northern Norway. METHOD: The Youth Self-Report, the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, and acculturation strategies were completed by 581 indigenous Sami and 291 Kven high school students in 1994-1995, at age 15-18 years. Response rate was 85%. Behavior problems were in addition to ethnic/national identity and acculturation attitudes studied in relation to ethnicity, gender, age, socioeconomic status, parentage, ethnic language, and ethnic context. RESULTS: Although there were no ethnic group differences in behavior problems, the impact of ethnocultural predictors differed between ethnocultural and indigenous adolescents. Acculturation attitudes were most significant for indigenous adolescents' mental health, and identity issues showed the strongest impact on ethnocultural peers. The study revealed significant gender differences regarding the influence of ethnocultural factors, and contextual variation among Sami adolescents with the strongest impact in contexts with low density of Sami people. CONCLUSIONS: The significant ethnic group variations emphasize the importance of conducting both between- and within-group analysis on the impact of ethnocultural issues on behavior problems in minority adolescents.
PubMed ID
12500077 View in PubMed
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Activity of disaccharidases in arctic populations: evolutionary aspects disaccharidases in arctic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4724
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):473-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Andrew Kozlov
Galina Vershubsky
Svetlana Borinskaya
Maria Sokolova
Vladislav Nuvano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Developmental Physiology, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow, Russia. aikozlov@narod.ru
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):473-6
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Age Factors
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Blood glucose
Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors - enzymology - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Diet
Disaccharidases - deficiency - metabolism
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Evolution
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Disorders of dietary sugar assimilation occur more often among native people of the Arctic then in temperate climate inhabitants.It is hypothesized that the limited variety of natural exogenous sugars in the Arctic, and their low content in the traditional diets of native northerners in accordance with a "protein-lipid" type of metabolism weakened selection, favoring diversity of disaccharidase enzymes.
PubMed ID
16079601 View in PubMed
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Adherence and barriers to H. pylori treatment in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105338
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Megan Lefebvre
Hsiu-Ju Chang
Amy Morse
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Karen Jean Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Proton Pump Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori infection is an emerging health concern to some northern Canadian Aboriginal communities and their clinicians. Clinicians in the north perceive H. pylori infection to be a major clinical problem because they find H. pylori infection in many patients evaluated for common stomach complaints, leading to frequent demand for treatment, which often fails. Moreover, public health authorities identified the need for information to develop locally appropriate H. pylori control strategies. We described adherence and identified barriers to completing treatment among H. pylori-positive participants in a community-based project inspired by local concerns about H. pylori infection risks.
In 2008, 110 H. pylori-positive participants (diagnosed by a breath test, histopathology and/or culture) of the Aklavik H. pylori project were randomised to standard-of-care or sequential treatment. We ascertained adherence by interviewing participants using a structured questionnaire. We estimated adherence frequencies as the proportion of participants who reported taking either 100% of doses (perfect adherence) or =80% of doses (good adherence). To compare the proportion with perfect or good adherence in subgroups, we report proportion differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Of 87 participants who were interviewed, 64% reported perfect adherence and 80% reported good adherence. We observed more frequent perfect adherence for: standard therapy (67%) versus sequential (62%); males (76%) versus females (52%); participants 40-77 years (79%) versus 17-39 (50%). Proportion differences were 5% (CI: -15, 25) for standard versus sequential therapy; 23% (CI: 4, 43) for male versus female; and 29% (CI: 10, 48) for 40-77 versus 15-39 years for perfect adherence. Of the 29 participants who reported poor adherence (
Notes
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PubMed ID
24416723 View in PubMed
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AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases in the arctic regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1681
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1990; 49 Suppl 3:1-38. Proceedings of the Circumpolar Meeting on AIDS Prevention, Ilulissat, Greenland, September 26-28, 1989.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1990; 49 Suppl 3:1-38. Proceedings of the Circumpolar Meeting on AIDS Prevention, Ilulissat, Greenland, September 26-28, 1989.
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
AIDS
HIV
Population
Syphilis
Gonorrhea
Homosexuality
Health education
STD
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Sexual Behavior
Syphilis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1891.
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AMAP assessment 2015: human health in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289656
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33949
Publication Type
Editorial
Date
2016
Author
Jon Øyvind Odland
Shawn Donaldson
Alexey Dudarev
Anders Carlsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; jon.oyvind.odland@uit.no.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33949
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Population Surveillance
Notes
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2012 Feb;215(2):159-67 PMID 22115955
PubMed ID
27974142 View in PubMed
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Arctic and Arctic-like rabies viruses: distribution, phylogeny and evolutionary history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162755
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Apr;136(4):509-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
I V Kuzmin
G J Hughes
A D Botvinkin
S G Gribencha
C E Rupprecht
Author Affiliation
Rabies Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. ibk3@cdc.gov
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Apr;136(4):509-19
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild - virology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Geography
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Phylogeny
RNA - analysis
Rabies - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Rabies virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Forty-one newly sequenced isolates of Arctic and Arctic-like rabies viruses, were genetically compared to each other and to those available from GenBank. Four phylogenetic lineages of Arctic viruses were identified. Arctic-1 viruses circulate in Ontario, Arctic-2 viruses circulate in Siberia and Alaska, Arctic-3 viruses circulate circumpolarly, and a newly described lineage Arctic-4 circulates locally in Alaska. The oldest available isolates from Siberia (between 1950 and 1960) belong to the Arctic-2 and Arctic-3 lineages and share 98.6-99.2% N gene identity with contemporary viruses. Two lineages of Arctic-like viruses were identified in southern Asia and the Middle East (Arctic-like-1) and eastern Asia (Arctic-like-2). A time-scaled tree demonstrates that the time of the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Arctic and Arctic-like viruses is dated between 1255 and 1786. Evolution of the Arctic viruses has occurred through a northerly spread. The Arctic-like-2 lineage diverged first, whereas Arctic viruses share a TMRCA with Arctic-like-1 viruses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17599781 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 May;61(2):88-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002

Arctic health policy: contribution of scientific data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4335
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):351-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
James E Berner
Andrew Gilman
Author Affiliation
Office of Community Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jberner@anthc.org
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):351-62
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Environmental health
Female
Health Policy
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
National Health Programs
Norway - epidemiology
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
In Western Hemisphere arctic regions, scientific findings in humans, wildlife, and the environment have resulted in major governmental policy formulations. Government policy resulted in establishment of an effective international organization to address scientifically identified problems, including health disparities in arctic indigenous populations. Western scientific data and indigenous knowledge from initial international programs led to international agreements restricting certain persistent organic pollutants. In recent years, scientific data, and indigenous traditional knowledge, have resulted in governmental policy in the United States, Canada, and Nordic countries that includes the full participation of indigenous residents in defining research agendas, interpreting data, communicating information, and local community policy formulation.
PubMed ID
12971690 View in PubMed
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338 records – page 1 of 34.