Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2873 records – page 1 of 288.

A 1-year, three-couple expedition as a crew analog for a Mars mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31234
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gloria R Leon
Mera M Atlis
Deniz S Ones
Graeme Magor
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA.
Source
Environ Behav. 2002 Sep;34(5):672-700
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Arctic Regions
Astronauts - psychology
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Darkness
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mars
Norway
Personality
Personnel Selection
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Space Simulation
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
This study assessed the intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning of a three-couple expedition group that included a 2 1/2-year-old child which was ice-locked on a boat in the High Arctic during a major portion of the expedition. Personality assessment indicated that team members were generally well adjusted, scoring relatively higher on well-being and achievement and relatively lower on stress reactivity. Weekly mood ratings showed that the group exhibited significantly higher positive than negative affect. Reported negative events were relatively most frequent at the beginning of the Arctic stay and toward the end of the darkness period and were lowest during the initial darkness interval. The period of darkness had both a salutary and negative impact. A highly important means of coping with stress was seeking emotional support from one's partner. Selection of couples with strong bonds with their partner appears to be one viable approach for crew selection for long-duration missions.
PubMed ID
12481801 View in PubMed
Less detail

3-D modeling substantiates perfluorinated theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82705
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Renner Rebecca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Alcohols
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Fluorocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Industry
Manufactured Materials
Models, Theoretical
Octanoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Notes
Comment On: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):924-3016509338
PubMed ID
16509290 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Laval Med. 1969 Dec;40(10):1049-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1969
Author
R. Michaud
Source
Laval Med. 1969 Dec;40(10):1049-53
Date
Dec-1969
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Preventive Medicine
PubMed ID
5400670 View in PubMed
Less detail

[4th International Symposium on arctic medicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4380
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1979 Feb;(2):60
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-1979

(7)Be, (210)Pb, and (210)Po in the surface air from the Arctic to Antarctica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264944
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2014 Dec;138:364-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Bertil R R Persson
Elis Holm
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2014 Dec;138:364-74
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Beryllium - analysis
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis
Polonium - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Siberia
Abstract
In the present study we have investigated the activity concentrations of (210)Pb, (210)Po as well as (7)Be in surface air of the North and South Atlantic (1988-1989), the Arctic Ocean (1991), and along the coastline of Siberia (1994) during succeeding expeditions in the Swedish Polar Research program. During the cruises in the Arctic Ocean during 1991-07-28 to 1991-10-04 the average air concentrations of (7)Be was 0.6 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), (210)Pb 40 ± 4 µBq/m(3) and (210)Po-38 ± 10 µBq/m(3). During the Swedish-Russian Tundra Ecology-94 expedition along the Siberian coastline the average air concentrations of (7)Be and (210)Pb measured during May-July were 11 ± 3, and 2.4 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), and during July-September they were 7.2 ± 2 and 2.7 ± 1.1 mBq/m(3) respectively. The results from measurements of the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air over the Arctic Ocean vary between 75 and 176 µBq/m(3). In the air close to land masses, however, the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air increases to 269-2712 µBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (7)Be in the South Atlantic during the cruise down to Antarctica varied between 1.3 and 1.7 with an average of 1.5 ± 0.8 mBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Pb in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 6 and 14 µBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration recorded in November 1988 was 630 µBq/m(3) and in April 1989 it was 260 µBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Pb during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 290 and on the return Montevideo-Gothenburg it was 230 µBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Po in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 15 and 58 µBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration in November 1988 was 170 and in April 1989 it was 70 µBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Po during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 63 and on the return Montevideo-Gothenburg it was 60 µBq/m(3). The average of the activity concentrations in the Antarctic air of (210)Pb was 27 ± 10 µBq/m(3) and of (210)Po it was 12 ± 7 µBq/m(3). All our results were compiled together with other published data, and the global latitudinal distribution of (210)Pb was converted to total annual deposition (Bq/m(2)/a) and fitted to a 4th degree polynomial. By using the global latitudinal distribution of (210)Po/(210)Pb-activity ratio from our own results the global latitudinal distribution of (210)Po annual deposition was derived.
PubMed ID
24525181 View in PubMed
Less detail

7th International Congress on Circumpolar Health. June 8-12, 1987, Umeå, Sweden, Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235798
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1987;45:1-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1987;45:1-79
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Humans
PubMed ID
3651197 View in PubMed
Less detail

15N in symbiotic fungi and plants estimates nitrogen and carbon flux rates in Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82286
Source
Ecology. 2006 Apr;87(4):816-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Hobbie John E
Hobbie Erik A
Author Affiliation
The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. jhobbie@mbl.edu
Source
Ecology. 2006 Apr;87(4):816-22
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Carbon - metabolism
Fungi - metabolism
Nitrogen Isotopes - metabolism
Plants - metabolism
Abstract
When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae): hyphae take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and receive plant sugars in return. In ecosystems, the transfers within the pathway fractionate nitrogen isotopes so that the natural abundance of 15N in fungi differs from that in their host plants by as much as 12% per hundred. Here we present a new method to quantify carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the symbiosis based on the fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from fungi to plant roots. We tested this method, which is based on the mass balance of 15N, with data from arctic Alaska where the nitrogen cycle is well studied. Mycorrhizal fungi provided 61-86% of the nitrogen in plants; plants provided 8-17% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration. This method of analysis avoids the disturbance of the soil-microbe-root relationship caused by collecting samples, mixing the soil, or changing substrate concentrations. This analytical technique also can be applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems, such as many temperate and boreal forests, to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of nutrient transfers mediated by mycorrhizae at the plant-soil interface.
PubMed ID
16676524 View in PubMed
Less detail

[24-h profile of arterial pressure in hypertensive patients working in rotatory teams in conditions of Far North (Tyumen Region)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5525
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
L I Gapon
N P Shurkevich
A S Vetoshkin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Abstract
AIM: To specify a 24-h profile of arterial pressure (AP) in hypertensive patients working in duty regime in the Far North (Tyumen Region). MATERIAL AND METHODS: AP parameters were studied in 155 males aged 25-59 with hypertension of stage I, II who were employed for duty work in the Far North areas and 38 control patients with hypertension stage I, II living in a moderate climatic zone (Tyumen). The groups were comparable by gender, age, duration of hypertension, office systolic and diastolic AP (SAP and DAP). All the patients have undergone 24-h monitoring of AP with assessment of basic mean parameters. RESULTS: The study group patients had scare symptoms and lower mean 24-h SAP, but high AP variability, high DAD as reflection of more significant structural changes of vessels and special functioning of the autonomic nervous system in the North. Mean 24-h AP showed more unfavourable changes in hypertensive subjects who had flight from Yamburg-Moscow-Yamburg. CONCLUSION: The data of the study dictate the necessity to develop a differentiated risk strategy for health promotion, prevention and treatment of hypertension in those who work in the North of Tyumen Region in duty regime.
PubMed ID
15759453 View in PubMed
Less detail

[24-hr monitoring arterial pressure in outpatients with cardiovascular risk factors in the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261133
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V B Simonenko
K B Solov'eva
I V Dolbin
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Arterial Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
To study peculiar features of daily AP rhythm and profile in men with cardiovascular risk factors residing in the Far North.
The study included 115 servicemen divided into 3 groups (hypertensive disease (HD), hypertonic type neurocirculatory asthenia (NCA) and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases other than AH). HD was diagnosed based on multiple AP measurements and 24-hr monitoring.
HD was associated with elevated mean AP, load indices and AP variability All patients had pathological type of morning dynamics. Normal daily rhythm of systolic AP (SAP) was documented in 66.1% of the patients with HD and in 68% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. Normal daily rhythm ofdiastolic AP (DAP) was recorded in 63.5% of the patients with HD and in 72% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. In group 2, normal daily rhythms of SAP and DAP were found in 44 and 56% of the cases respectively.
Men residing in the Far North under conditions of anomalous photoperiod need medicamentous correction of AP regardless of AH type. Ambulatory BP monitoring should be preferred for the assessment of the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy.
PubMed ID
25696949 View in PubMed
Less detail

25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
Cites: Chem Biol. 2014 Mar 20;21(3):319-29 PMID 24529992
Cites: Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 2015 Jul;123(7):386-93 PMID 26171622
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2014 Feb;80(2):169-81 PMID 24256495
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 1986 Jun 15;157(2):175-81 PMID 3013467
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 1987 Dec;73(6):659-64 PMID 3690980
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):582S-586S PMID 18689406
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):165-70 PMID 24197920
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Oct 12;11(10 ):e0164395 PMID 27732653
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):1080S-6S PMID 18400738
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2001 Nov;16(11):2066-73 PMID 11697803
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Dec 15;309(12):E1019-31 PMID 26506852
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Jan;20(1):133-40 PMID 18458986
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1988 Aug;67(2):373-8 PMID 2839537
Cites: Diabetes. 2010 Jan;59(1):242-8 PMID 19833894
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1425-31 PMID 15744449
Cites: Curr Sports Med Rep. 2010 Jul-Aug;9(4):220-6 PMID 20622540
Cites: Sports Health. 2014 Jul;6(4):340-7 PMID 24982708
Cites: J Fam Health. 2015 May-Jun;25(3):16-9 PMID 26118289
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 13;74:27963 PMID 25976742
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Aug;37(4):798-802 PMID 22554144
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2013 Oct;63(7):485-93 PMID 24027218
Cites: Mo Med. 2014 Jan-Feb;111(1):49-53 PMID 24645299
Cites: Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2014 Jun;25(4):338-43 PMID 24628618
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2009 Sep;49(3):278-84 PMID 19884877
Cites: Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2014 Nov;17(6):539-45 PMID 25137505
Cites: Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2008 Jan;9(1):107-18 PMID 18076342
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2015 Dec 14;114(11):1838-44 PMID 26420417
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Apr;22(4):535-42 PMID 24398372
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jul 28;:1-8 PMID 27465921
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 May 28;5(6):1856-68 PMID 23760056
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Feb;94(2):559-63 PMID 19033372
Cites: Sports Med. 2015 Feb;45(2):213-29 PMID 25252613
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Feb;90(2):635-40 PMID 15546897
Cites: Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2012 Jan-Mar;6(1):28-31 PMID 23014251
Cites: Sports Health. 2012 Nov;4(6):496-501 PMID 24179588
Cites: Asian J Sports Med. 2011 Dec;2(4):211-9 PMID 22375241
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013 May;56(5):551-5 PMID 23274340
Cites: J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2015 Aug 19;12:33 PMID 26288575
Cites: Exerc Immunol Rev. 2013;19:86-101 PMID 23977722
Cites: J Endocrinol Invest. 2014 Jul;37(7):609-17 PMID 24696159
Cites: World J Diabetes. 2015 Jul 10;6(7):896-911 PMID 26185598
PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
Less detail

2873 records – page 1 of 288.