Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

An archival analysis of actual cases of historic child sexual abuse: A comparison of jury and bench trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168744
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2006 Jun;30(3):259-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
J Don Read
Deborah A Connolly
Andrew Welsh
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, Canada, V5A 1S6. jdonread@sfu.ca
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2006 Jun;30(3):259-85
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archives
Canada
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - history
Crime - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Abstract
Logistic regression analyses were used to predict verdicts from 466 Canadian jury and 644 Canadian judge-alone criminal trials involving delayed or historic allegations of child sexual abuse. Variables in regard to the complainant and offence were selected from the legal, clinical, and experimental literatures, including mock juror research. Of six variables that had been related to decisions reached in mock juror research concerning delayed allegations of child sexual abuse (i.e., repressed memory testimony, involvement in therapy, length of delay, age of complainant, presence of experts, and frequency of abuse) two (age of complainant and presence of expert) predicted verdicts. An additional five variables (duration, severity, complainant-accused relationship, threats, and complainant gender) were also examined: of these, threats and the complainant-accused relationship reliably predicted jury verdicts. For judge-alone trials, five variables predicted verdict: length of the delay, offence severity, claims of repression, the relationship between complainant and accused, and presence of an expert. Implications of the jurors' and judges' differential sensitivity to these variables for future simulation and archival research are discussed.
PubMed ID
16786401 View in PubMed
Less detail

An inventory of United States and Canadian growth record sets: preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220916
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1993 Jun;103(6):545-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
W S Hunter
S. Baumrind
R E Moyers
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1993 Jun;103(6):545-55
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Archives
Canada
Cephalometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Cleft palate
Dental Models
Dental Records
Directories as Topic
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maxillofacial Development
Radiography, Dental
Radiology Information Systems
United States
Abstract
A listing and description of longitudinal craniofacial growth record sets currently extant on the North American continent is provided. An argument is made for the preservation of these resources and for the generation of a pooled or shared image base of duplicate craniofacial physical records. This is a preliminary report and is assumed to be incomplete. In an effort to improve our accuracy and completeness, we invite corrections and additions.
PubMed ID
8506817 View in PubMed
Less detail

Archiving of care related information in XML-format.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195903
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2000;77:642-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Olhede
H E Peterson
Author Affiliation
Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University/Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 230, SE-164 40 Kista, Sweden. tor@dsv.su.se
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2000;77:642-6
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archives
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Software
Sweden
Abstract
Patient related care information is important over long periods of time. Thus it cannot be stored in running systems handling day by day information exchange. In the future, when the demands arise to use patient related information, neither the programmes nor the databases, in which the information once was fed, will be available. These facts imply that electronically stored patient related information must be electronically accessible and searchable and thus the information must be stored in a time-invariant way. In future use of patient related information it is of extraordinary importance both nationally, in the EU and internationally to use a standardised way to handle and access archived patient related information. Already in 1995 the search for a solution of these issues was initialised at the Health Informatics Department at Spri--the Swedish National Institute for Health Services Development. A number of internal reports have been produced as background information. Further work has to be carried out at relevant organisational levels in order to structure and logically harmonise an archiving format. The basic XML-format has been preliminary tested by a Spri project and found suitable. Spri has advised the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and the Swedish National Archive to issue directives concerning the use of XML as the archive-format for EHCR (Electronic Health Care Record) information.
PubMed ID
11187632 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing historical exposure is like solving a mystery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174283
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Jul;62(7):429-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
H. Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Environmental and Occupational Health Division, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, PO Box 80176, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands. H.Kromhout@iras.uu.nl
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Jul;62(7):429-30
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Archives
Data Collection - methods
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Industry
Laundering
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Notes
Comment On: Occup Environ Med. 2005 Jul;62(7):434-4115961618
PubMed ID
15961615 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A video archive on the Internet for dissemination of knowledge of minimally invasive techniques].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181071
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Feb 12;101(7):561-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-2004
Author
Lars-Göran Larsson
Author Affiliation
Sektionen för övre gastrointestinal kirurgi, Universitetssjukhuset, Orebro. lars-goran.larsson@orebroll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Feb 12;101(7):561-2
Date
Feb-12-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archives
Diffusion of Innovation
General Surgery - education
Humans
Internet
Laparoscopy - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive - education - methods
Sweden
Videotape Recording
PubMed ID
15024863 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a standardized format for archiving and exchange of electronic patient records in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210368
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1997;43 Pt A:252-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T. Wigefeldt
S. Larnholt
H. Peterson
Author Affiliation
SPRI (The Swedish Institute for Health Services Development, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1997;43 Pt A:252-6
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archives
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Reference Standards
Sweden
Abstract
This paper describes an effort to standardize the long term archiving format of the electronic patient record. A format is given in SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) and also tested as a prototype in a production system.
PubMed ID
10179549 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Evaluation of the incidence of congenital developmental defects in newborn infants based on an analysis of archival documentation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231143
Source
Gig Sanit. 1989 Mar;(3):38-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
I V Nikolaeva
I N Lunga
V V Viktorov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1989 Mar;(3):38-41
Date
Mar-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archives
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Medical Records
Moscow
Neonatology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Incidence of congenital malformations in the newborn was analyzed on the basis of the medical archives, thus the possibility of using the obtained data for genetic monitoring being established.
PubMed ID
2744503 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 25;170(9):716-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2008
Author
Merete Osler
Lone Bredahl
Steen Ousager
Author Affiliation
Syddansk Universitet, Institut for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, Epidemiologi. m.osler@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 25;170(9):716-7
Date
Feb-25-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Archives
Biomedical research
Databases as Topic
Denmark
Documentation
Humans
Registries
Research Support as Topic
Abstract
Currently several scientific journals only publish data from randomised clinical trials which are registered in a public database. Similar requirements on data sharing now follow grants from agencies such as the National Institute of Health. In Denmark the Health unit at the Danish Data Archive (DDA/Health) offers Danish researchers to keep their data for free on conditions that fulfil the above requirements. DDA/Health also passes on research data for reuse, and at present more than 300 studies are available in a database on sundhed.dda.dk.
PubMed ID
18307956 View in PubMed
Less detail

From the archives of the AFIP. Child abuse: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5101
Source
Radiographics. 2003 Jul-Aug;23(4):811-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gael J Lonergan
Andrew M Baker
Mitchel K Morey
Steven C Boos
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th and Alaska Sts NW, Bldg 54, Rm M-121, Washington, DC 20306-6000, USA. glonergan@mac.com
Source
Radiographics. 2003 Jul-Aug;23(4):811-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archives
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Military Medicine - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pathology, Clinical - statistics & numerical data - trends
Radiography - statistics & numerical data - trends
Radiology Information Systems - statistics & numerical data - trends
Wounds and Injuries - pathology - radiography
Abstract
In the United States, roughly one of every 100 children is subjected to some form of neglect or abuse; inflicted injury is responsible for approximately 1,200 deaths per year. Child physical abuse may manifest as virtually any injury pattern known to medicine. Some of the injuries observed in battered children are relatively unique to this population (especially when observed in infants) and therefore are highly suggestive of nonaccidental, or inflicted, injury. Worrisome injuries include rib fracture, metaphyseal fracture, interhemispheric extraaxial hemorrhage, shear-type brain injury, vertebral compression fracture, and small bowel hematoma and laceration. As noted, however, virtually any injury may be inflicted; therefore, careful consideration of the nature of the injury, the developmental capabilities of the child, and the given history are crucial to determine the likelihood that an injury was inflicted. The majority of these injuries are readily detectable at imaging, and radiologic examination forms the mainstay of evaluation of child physical abuse. Detection of metaphyseal fracture (regarded as the most specific radiographically detectable injury in abuse) depends on high-quality, small field-of-view radiographs. The injury manifests radiographically as a lucent area within the subphyseal metaphysis, extending completely or partially across the metaphysis, roughly perpendicular to the long axis of the bone. Acute rib fractures (which in infants are strongly correlated with abuse) appear as linear lucent areas. They may be difficult to discern when acute; thus, follow-up radiography increases detection of these fractures. For skull injuries, radiography is best for detecting fractures, but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging best depict intracranial injury.
PubMed ID
12853657 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.