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Architecture as animate landscape: circular shrines in the ancient Maya lowlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123816
Source
Am Anthropol. 2012;114(1):64-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eleanor Harrison-Buck
Author Affiliation
University of New Hampshire, Durham.
Source
Am Anthropol. 2012;114(1):64-80
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Architecture as Topic - education - history
Environment
History, Ancient
Housing - history
Humans
Indians, Central American - ethnology - history
Indians, North American - ethnology - history
Abstract
In this study, I develop a theory of landscape archaeology that incorporates the concept of “animism” as a cognitive approach. Current trends in anthropology are placing greater emphasis on indigenous perspectives, and in recent decades animism has seen a resurgence in anthropological theory. As a means of relating in (not to) one's world, animism is a mode of thought that has direct bearing on landscape archaeology. Yet, Americanist archaeologists have been slow to incorporate this concept as a component of landscape theory. I consider animism and Nurit Bird-David's (1999) theory of “relatedness” and how such perspectives might be expressed archaeologically in Mesoamerica. I examine the distribution of marine shells and cave formations that appear incorporated as architectural elements on ancient Maya circular shrine architecture. More than just “symbols” of sacred geography, I suggest these materials represent living entities that animate shrines through their ongoing relationships with human and other-than-human agents in the world.
PubMed ID
22662354 View in PubMed
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Facilitating the Concept of Universal Design Among Design Students - Changes in Teaching in the Last Decade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282487
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:167-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tom Vavik
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:167-8
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility
Architecture as Topic - education
Disabled Persons
Norway
Students
Teaching
Abstract
This short paper describes and reflects on how the teaching of the concept of Universal Design (UD) has developed in the last decade at the Institute of Design at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO). Four main changes are described. Firstly, the curriculum has evolved from teaching guidelines and principles to focusing on design processes. Secondly, an increased emphasis is put on cognitive accessibility. Thirdly, non-stigmatizing aesthetics expressions and solutions that communicate through different senses have become more important subjects. Fourthly the teaching of UD has moved from the second to the first year curriculum.
PubMed ID
27534301 View in PubMed
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How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282485
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:229-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Leif D Houck
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:229-39
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architecture as Topic - education
Competitive Behavior
Disabled Persons
Environment Design - standards
Judgment
Norway
Abstract
This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details.
PubMed ID
27534308 View in PubMed
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