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63 records – page 1 of 7.

[Assessment of rate of infection with agents of bacterial infections in ticks captured on one of the Moscow park terrains].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149563
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 May-Jun;(3):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
I G Kharitonenkov
T. Masuzawa
I. Okamoto
T. Fukui
I V Trifonov
Iu P Reznikov
A G Rumiantsev
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 May-Jun;(3):14-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaplasma phagocytophilum - isolation & purification
Anaplasmosis - epidemiology
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Borrelia - isolation & purification
Borrelia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Ehrlichiosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Female
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the rate of infection of ticks captured one of the Moscow park terrains with bacteria (agents of tick borreliosis and anaplasmosis).
Rates of infection of dried ticks with agents of main tick-borne bacterial infections (tick borreliosis and anaplasmosis) were determined by nested PCR.
In May-June 2006, 76 ticks (40 adult females, 36 adult, males) belonged to Ixodes ricinus species were captured by the method "on flag". Number of ticks on the chosen terrain was 1.77 ticks per km2. 22.4% of ticks (12 females and 5 males) were positive for the agent of tick borreliosis--spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato which is pathogenic for humans. The main detected pathogen was Euro-Asian genovariant of B. garinii--7 female and 5 male ticks (70.6% from total number of infected ticks) were infected with it. Five female ticks were infected with genovariant of B. afzelii. One female tick (1.2%) was infected with B. valaisiana.
Anaplasma A. phagocytophilum causing human granulocytic anaplasmosis was not detected in captured adult ticks.
PubMed ID
19621812 View in PubMed
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Astrakhan fever rickettsiae: antigenic and genotypic analysis of isolates obtained from human and Rhipicephalus pumilio ticks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216944
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1994 Nov;51(5):697-706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M E Eremeeva
L. Beati
V A Makarova
N F Fetisova
I V Tarasevich
N M Balayeva
D. Raoult
Author Affiliation
Unite des Rickettsies, Faculte de Medecine, Marseille France.
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1994 Nov;51(5):697-706
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - analysis
Boutonneuse Fever - microbiology
Cercopithecus aethiops
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Genotype
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Mice
Microscopy, Electron
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Russia
Serotyping
Ticks - microbiology
Vero Cells
Abstract
Two spotted fever group rickettsia strains, A-108 and A-167, were isolated from the hemolymph of Rhipicephalus pumilio ticks collected in the Astrakhan region of Russia, which is area endemic for Astrakhan fever. These tick isolates were compared with a strain isolated from a patient suffering from Astrakhan fever and with reference spotted fever group rickettsiae strains. New tick isolates and the human strain were identical in their serologic, antigenic, and genetic characteristics by several methods: microimmunofluorescence, protein gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction endonuclease fragment length polymorphism analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Astrakhan fever rickettsiae were found to be serologically and antigenically similar to Israeli spotted fever rickettsiae. Both of them probably belong to a single Rickettsia conorii pathotype complex. Only PFGE pattern analysis could clearly discriminate Astrakhan fever rickettsiae from other isolates.
PubMed ID
7985764 View in PubMed
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[A virulence study of tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated in the southern Soviet Far East].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228426
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1990 Sep-Oct;35(5):399-401
Publication Type
Article
Author
G N Leonova
S M Muratkina
S P Krugliak
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1990 Sep-Oct;35(5):399-401
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibody-Producing Cells - immunology - microbiology
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Cricetinae
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - classification - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - microbiology
Humans
Mesocricetus
Mice
Rodentia - microbiology
Siberia
Ticks - microbiology
Virulence
Abstract
Study of virulence for white mice and Syrian hamsters of 115 tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated in Maritime Territory showed virulence to be a complex biological manifestation of pathogenic properties of tick-borne encephalitis virus. The virulent properties of strains may have individual manifestations in each species of specific causative agent hosts and susceptible experimental biological models.
PubMed ID
2267782 View in PubMed
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Biological and genetic characterization of Rickettsia sibirica strains isolated in the endemic area of the north Asian tick typhus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210437
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1996 Dec;55(6):685-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
N M Balayeva
M E Eremeeva
V F Ignatovich
N V Rudakov
T A Reschetnikova
I E Samoilenko
V K Yastrebov
D. Raoult
Author Affiliation
Unite des Rickettsies, Faculte de Medecine, Marseille, France.
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1996 Dec;55(6):685-92
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Cercopithecus aethiops
Chick Embryo
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Genome, Viral
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Rickettsia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Rickettsia Infections - microbiology - transmission
Russia
Ticks - microbiology
Vero Cells
Virulence
Abstract
Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified gene fragments was used to characterize 24 isolates of spotted fever group rickettsiae previously identified as Rickettsia sibirica from their serologic properties. These strains were obtained in Russia between 1946 and 1991 from humans and different species of Ixodid ticks. The RFLP analysis was performed using amplified DNA products obtained with a genus-specific primer pair derived from the R. prowazekii citrate synthase gene and two group-specific primer pairs from the R. rickettsii 190-kD and 120-kD surface protein antigen genes followed by Alu I, Pst I, and Rsa I restriction endonuclease digestions. Although some differences were detected in biological characteristics among the examined strains, only a single R. sibirica genotype was found with these molecular tools of identification.
PubMed ID
9025699 View in PubMed
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Co-infection with 'Candidatus Neoehrlichia Mikurensis' and Borrelia afzelii in Ixodes ricinus ticks in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262280
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2013 Jul;13(7):438-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Martin Andersson
Simona Bartkova
Olle Lindestad
Lars Råberg
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2013 Jul;13(7):438-42
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaplasmataceae - genetics - isolation & purification
Anaplasmataceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Borrelia burgdorferi Group - genetics - isolation & purification
Chaperonin 60 - genetics
Coinfection
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sweden - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
The tick-borne bacterium 'Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis' has recently been recognized as a human pathogen in Europe and appears to be the second most common pathogenic bacterium in Ixodes ricinus ticks in central Europe, second to Borrelia afzelii. Here, we investigate the prevalence of 'Candidatus N. mikurensis' in host-seeking ticks in southern Sweden and the rate of co-infection with B. afzelii. We developed a real-time qPCR assay targeting the groEL gene of 'Candidatus N. mikurensis' and applied this assay to 949 I. ricinus ticks collected at several locations over 2 years. We found an overall prevalence of 6.0%, which means that Candidatus N. mikurensis is one of the most common tick-transmitted zoonotic agents in this area. Co-infections with both 'Candidatus N. mikurensis' and B. afzelii occurred in 2.1% of the ticks, which is significantly more than expected under random co-occurrence. The infection intensity (number of bacterial cells) of 'Candidatus N. mikurensis' was not affected by co-infection with B. afzelii, and vice versa. We conclude that there is a risk for simultaneous transmission of these 2 tick-borne pathogens. The potential medical consequences of this require further investigation.
PubMed ID
23590321 View in PubMed
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[Combined focus of tick-borne encephalitis, tick-borne rickettsiosis and tularemia in the habitat of Haemaphysalis concinna in south central Siberia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195465
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2001 Jan-Feb;(1):78-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
T G Khazova
V K Iastrebov
Author Affiliation
Territorial Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Inspection, Krasnoyarsk, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2001 Jan-Feb;(1):78-80
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Disease Reservoirs
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology
Humans
Rickettsia Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Siberia - epidemiology
Ticks - microbiology
Tularemia - epidemiology
Abstract
For the first time in the Krasnoyarsk region the population Haemaphysalis concinna ticks were found to be infected with the causative agents of three natural focal tick-borne infections--tick-borne encephalitis, tick-borne rickettsiosis and tularemia. The existence of the combined natural focus of these three infections has been confirmed by epidemiological data. Ticks Dermacentor nuttalli also play a similar role in combined foci of tick-borne encephalitis and tick-borne rickettsiosis in these focal territories.
PubMed ID
11236514 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparative analysis of the roles of Ixodes persulcatus and I. trianguliceps ticks in natural foci of ixodid tick-borne borrelioses in the Middle Urals, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272589
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2015 Apr;6(3):316-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Edward I Korenberg
Yurii V Kovalevskii
Natalya B Gorelova
Valentina V Nefedova
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2015 Apr;6(3):316-21
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Arvicolinae
Base Sequence
Borrelia - genetics - isolation & purification
Borrelia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Borrelia burgdorferi Group - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Intergenic - genetics
Disease Reservoirs
Female
Ixodes - microbiology
Larva
Male
Mammals
Molecular Sequence Data
Nymph
Russia - epidemiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Long-term studies on natural foci of ixodid tick-borne borrelioses (ITBB) have been performed in Chusovskoi district of Perm region, the Middle Urals, where the vectors of these infections are represented by two ixodid tick species: the taiga tick Ixodes persulcatus and many times less abundant vole tick I. trianguliceps. Over 10 years, more than 6000 half-engorged ticks were collected from small forest mammals using the standard procedure, and 1027 I. persulcatus and 1142 I. trianguliceps ticks, individually or in pools, were used to inoculate BSK-2 medium. As a result, 199 Borrelia isolates were obtained. Among them, 177 isolates were identified, and the rrf(5S)-rrl(23S) intergenic spacer sequence was determined in 57 isolates. The prevalence of Borrelia infection in I. persulcatus larvae and nymphs averaged 31.0 and 53.3%, while that in I. trianguliceps larvae, nymphs, and adult ticks was five to ten times lower: 2.6, 10.2, and 8.1%, respectively. Each of the two tick species was found to carry both ITBB agents circulating in the Middle Ural foci (Borrelia garinii and B. afzelii), but the set of genogroups and genovariants of these spirochetes in I. trianguliceps proved to be far less diverse. According to the available data, this tick, compared to I. persulcatus, is generally less susceptible to Borrelia infection (especially by B. afzelii). Taking into account of its relatively low abundance, it appears that I. trianguliceps cannot seriously influence the course of epizootic process in ITBB foci of the study region, whereas highly abundant I. persulcatus with the high level of Borrelia infection is obviously a key component of these parasitic systems. A similar situation may well be typical for the entire geographic range shared by the two tick species.
PubMed ID
25843812 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.