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Acceptance of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection: prospective cohort study in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115630
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
P W Colson
Y. Hirsch-Moverman
J. Bethel
P. Vempaty
K. Salcedo
K. Wall
W. Miranda
S. Collins
C R Horsburgh
Author Affiliation
Charles P Felton National Tuberculosis Center, International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. pwc2@columbia.edu
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Latent Tuberculosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Refusal
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An estimated 300?000 individuals are treated for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in the United States and Canada annually. Little is known about the proportion or characteristics of those who decline treatment.
To define the proportion of individuals in various groups who accept LTBI treatment and to identify factors associated with non-acceptance of treatment.
Persons offered LTBI treatment at 30 clinics in 12 Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium sites were prospectively enrolled. Multivariate regression models were constructed based on manual stepwise assessment of potential predictors.
Of 1692 participants enrolled from March 2007 to September 2008, 1515 (89.5%) accepted treatment and 177 (10.5%) declined. Predictors of acceptance included believing one could personally spread TB germs, having greater TB knowledge, finding clinic schedules convenient and having low acculturation. Predictors of non-acceptance included being a health care worker, being previously recommended for treatment and believing that taking medicines would be problematic.
This is the first prospective multisite study to examine predictors of LTBI treatment acceptance in general clinic populations. Greater efforts should be made to increase acceptance among health care workers, those previously recommended for treatment and those who expect problems with LTBI medicines. Ensuring convenient clinic schedules and TB education to increase knowledge could be important for ensuring acceptance.
PubMed ID
23485381 View in PubMed
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[Accessibility and waiting time in general practice. A patient study in Northern Norway in 1987].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228019
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3484-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1990
Author
B. Straume
A. Forsdahl
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Nov 10;110(27):3484-8
Date
Nov-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Consumer Satisfaction
Family Practice - organization & administration - standards
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In the opinion of the public, accessibility is probably one of the most important features of general practice. More than 3,500 patients in North Norway answered a questionnaire asking for their opinions on waiting time for consultation, the time spent in consultation and the possibility of the doctor visiting them at home. 80% thought that a waiting time of more than one week was too long. The actual waiting times differ considerably, but only a few practices serving less than 900 inhabitants per physician managed to satisfy their patients. On the other hand, about 80% found the time allocated for the consultation to be adequate. Almost half the patients who expressed an opinion thought it too difficult to get a doctor to visit them at home. Less than 10% considered a long distance to travel to a doctor to be an obstacle. Not surprisingly, young people were most demanding as regards quick service. Men were somewhat more satisfied than women, as were patients in rural areas compared with patients in the towns. In our opinion, some of the patients' causes of dissatisfaction can be removed by better routines. However, it seems that the resources available within general practice, are inadequate to meet all the patients' wishes, either now or in the future.
PubMed ID
2256076 View in PubMed
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[Access to health care: perceptions of patients with multiple chronic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167791
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Martin Fortin
Danielle Maltais
Catherine Hudon
Lise Lapointe
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine de Famille, l'Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Date
Nov-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Chronic Disease
Communication Barriers
Female
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Quebec
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access.
Qualitative study with focus groups.
Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que.
Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions.
For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held.
The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access.
Systematic callbacks, family physicians' personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(11):1611-2511072882
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;54(7):661-7411438406
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Nov 11;162(20):2269-7612418941
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Oct;84(10):1417-2514586907
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1997 Sep-Oct;16(5):149-629314686
Cites: J Ambul Care Manage. 1998 Jul;21(3):17-2610181843
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2005 May-Jun;3(3):223-815928225
PubMed ID
16926944 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of recall of dental care received during the preceding year.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110559
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1968 Aug;34(8):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1968
Author
J V Chatwin
F M Delaquis
C B Walker
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1968 Aug;34(8):409-12
Date
Aug-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Canada
Dental Records
Humans
Memory
Military Personnel
Statistics as Topic
PubMed ID
5243741 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Rita Suri
Thomas A Depner
Peter G Blake
A Paul Heidenheim
Robert M Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Optimal Dialysis Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):42-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemodialysis, Home - methods
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Urea - blood
Abstract
Several methods exist to quantitate small-solute clearance by daily hemodialysis (HD) regimens, but these have not been empirically applied or compared.
In the London Daily/Nocturnal Hemodialysis Study, dosing and adequacy of quotidian HD regimens, both short daily HD (n = 11) and long nocturnal HD (n = 12), were compared with conventional thrice-weekly HD (n = 22) using several models. Urea clearance was computed by percentage of reduction in urea, kinetic modeling (single-pool Kt/V [spKt/V]), Daugirdas rate equation (equilibrated Kt/V [eKt/V]), and Gotch standardized Kt/V (stdKt/V).
Nocturnal HD patients maintained a mean single-session spKt/V of 1.64 throughout the study, similar to that of conventional HD patients (1.73), whereas daily HD patients showed a significant decrease in mean single-session spKt/V (0.93) compared with baseline (t(0)) values. Mean weekly spKt/V values increased from t(0) for both quotidian HD groups (9.08 for nocturnal HD, 5.55 for daily HD) and were higher in both quotidian HD groups compared with conventional HD patients. Weekly eKt/V, stdKt/V, and normalized protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance values showed similar trends. Comparison of the 3 different adequacy models showed an increase in weekly HD doses for both quotidian HD regimens compared with conventional HD; however, percentages of increases from t(0) to follow-up differed according to the model used. The calculated efficiency of dose delivery at the 10-month follow-up comparing daily HD with conventional HD was 257 +/- 26 minutes versus 306 +/- 17 stdKt/V unit delivered, respectively, amounting to almost 1 dialysis-hour saved per stdKt/V unit delivered for daily HD.
These results show that both quotidian HD regimens are more effective than conventional HD in improving weekly urea clearance measured by spKt/V, stdKt/V, and eKt/V.
PubMed ID
12830443 View in PubMed
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Adherence to waiting-time targets for pediatric nephrology clinic referrals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147172
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 2010 Feb;25(2):311-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Maria Radina
Ajay P Sharma
Abeer Yasin
Guido Filler
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 2010 Feb;25(2):311-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appointments and Schedules
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Kidney Diseases - diagnosis
Male
Nephrology
Pediatrics
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Waiting times for specialist consultation have not been adequately studied, especially in the pediatric population. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which pediatric nephrology subspecialty clinic referral waiting times are adhered to with regard to previously determined access targets. Referrals to the pediatric nephrology clinics at Children's Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada, received between October 2007 and November 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Appointment schedule was allotted by a nephrologist based on the patient's presenting complaint, reported in the referral, in accordance with the previously determined access targets. Adherence to access targets was assessed by the actual clinic visit. There were a total of 250 referrals during the timeframe studied. The median waiting time was 73 (range 0-193) days. Overall, 64% (159/250) of patients met their access target. The median time that patients waited over their access target was 6 (range 0-78) days. Of the patients who did not meet their access targets, 31% (28/91) exceeded their target by 20% or more. Office handling was a component for patients with access target
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Nephrol. 2013 May;28(5):831-223224134
PubMed ID
19937350 View in PubMed
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Admission waiting times: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103208
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Feb;67(1):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990

297 records – page 1 of 30.