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Adverse Infant Outcomes Associated with Discordant Gestational Age Estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281353
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 11;30(6):541-549
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-2016
Author
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Rolv Skjaerven
Jennifer L Richards
Michael R Kramer
Sven Cnattingius
Stefan Johansson
Mika Gissler
Siobhan M Dolan
Jennifer Zeitlin
Michael S Kramer
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 11;30(6):541-549
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth Certificates
Data Accuracy
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Premature - physiology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sweden
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
United States
Abstract
Gestational age estimation by last menstrual period (LMP) vs. ultrasound (or best obstetric estimate in the US) may result in discrepant classification of preterm vs. term birth. We investigated whether such discrepancies are associated with adverse infant outcomes.
We studied singleton livebirths in the Medical Birth Registries of Norway, Sweden and Finland and US live birth certificates from 1999 to the most recent year available. Risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) by discordant and concordant gestational age estimation for infant, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality, Apgar score
PubMed ID
27555359 View in PubMed
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Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Adolescents in Northwest Russia: A Population Registry-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296661
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-03-2018
Author
Anna A Usynina
Vitaly Postoev
Jon Øyvind Odland
Andrej M Grjibovski
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø 9037, Norway. perinat@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Date
02-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Body Weight
Delivery, Obstetric
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Reproductive Tract Infections - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012-2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm birth (
PubMed ID
29401677 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes related to advanced maternal age compared with smoking and being overweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105162
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ulla Waldenström
Vigdis Aasheim
Anne Britt Vika Nilsen
Svein Rasmussen
Hans Järnbert Pettersson
Erica Schytt
Erica Shytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, and the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset (KI SÖS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and the Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden; and the Center for Evidence Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bergen University College, and the Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes and to compare the risks related to advanced maternal age with those related to smoking and being overweight or obese.
A population-based register study including all nulliparous women aged 25 years and older with singleton pregnancies at 22 weeks of gestation or greater who gave birth in Sweden and Norway from 1990 to 2010; 955,804 women were analyzed. In each national sample, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of very preterm birth, moderately preterm birth, small for gestational age, low Apgar score, fetal death, and neonatal death in women aged 30-34 years (n=319,057), 35-39 years (n=94,789), and 40 years or older (n=15,413) were compared with those of women aged 25-29 years (n=526,545). In the Swedish sample, the number of additional cases of each outcome associated with maternal age 30 years or older, smoking, and overweight or obesity, respectively, was estimated in relation to a low-risk group of nonsmokers of normal weight and aged 25-29 years.
The adjusted OR of all outcomes increased by maternal age in a similar way in Sweden and Norway; and the risk of fetal death was increased even in the 30- to 34-year-old age group (Sweden n=826, adjusted OR 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.37; Norway n=472, adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.12-1.41). Maternal age 30 years or older was associated with the same number of additional cases of fetal deaths (n=251) as overweight or obesity (n=251).
For the individual woman, the absolute risk for each of the outcomes was small, but for society, it may be significant as a result of the large number of women who give birth after the age of 30 years.
II.
Notes
Erratum In: Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Mar;123(3):669Shytt, Erica [corrected to Schytt, Erica]
PubMed ID
24463670 View in PubMed
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Aetiology in severe and mild mental retardation: a population-based study of Norwegian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32919
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2000 Feb;42(2):76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
P. Strømme
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, The National Hospital, Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, Norway. petter.stromme@rh.uio.no
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2000 Feb;42(2):76-86
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cephalometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Retardation - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The aetiology of mental retardation (MR) was studied in a population-based series of Norwegian children derived from 30 037 children born between 1980 and 1985. The study included 178 children, 79 with severe MR (SMR) (IQ
PubMed ID
10698323 View in PubMed
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Alaska's improved pregnancy outcome project: an evaluation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76572
Source
Pages 384-387 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
extensive literature review (available upon request), of both the measures of and factors affect- ing pregnancy outcomes, especially among teenagers, three indicators were chosen as outcome measures: infant's birth weight, gestational age, and 5-minute Apgar score. Prematurity, low Apgar score, and
  1 document  
Author
Dilley, M.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Juneau, Alaska
Source
Pages 384-387 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Apgar scores
Birth weight
Fairbanks Health Center
Gestational Age
Improved Pregnancy Outcome (IPO) project
Medical-obstetric factors
Sociodemographic factors
Documents
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Analysis of perinatal mortality at a teaching hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1999-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79181
Source
Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Kidanto Hussein L
Massawe Siriel N
Nystrom Lennarth
Lindmark Gunilla
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. hkidanto@muchs.ac.tz
Source
Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):72-80
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Tanzania - epidemiology
Abstract
We conducted a retrospective analysis of perinatal mortality at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania 1999-2003 in order to categorise/classify perinatal deaths as well as to identify key factors in perinatal care that could be improved. Data were retrieved from the MNH obstetric database and causes of early neonatal deaths were traced from the neonatal ward register. The study includes all foetuses weighing =500g. A modified Nordic-Baltic classification was used for classification of perinatal deaths. Over a 5-year period there were 77,815 babies born with a perinatal mortality rate of 124 per 1000 births, 78% of which was labour related stillbirth. The PMR was 913/1000 for singleton births and 723/1000 for multiple births for babies weighing less than 1500 grams and 65/1000 for singleton births and 116/1000 for multiple births for babies weighing 2500 grams or more. Babies weighing less than 1500 grams contributed 26% of PMR, whereas 41% occurred in babies weighing 2500 grams or more. The majority (79%) of neonatal deaths had Apgar score
PubMed ID
17217119 View in PubMed
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Antepartum risk score predicts adverse birth outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144409
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Jan;32(1):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Igor Burstyn
Author Affiliation
Community and Occupational Medicine Program, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Jan;32(1):16-20
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Apgar score
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Premature Birth
Resuscitation
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
Standardized risk assessment plays an important role in providing medical care of uniform quality to pregnant women, even though it is not a substitute for clinical judgement. This study was designed to determine whether the antepartum risk score currently used across Alberta is associated with neonatal morbidity and adverse pregnancy outcomes for singleton live births and to examine whether the current classification of "lower risk" pregnancies (score
PubMed ID
20370976 View in PubMed
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Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2019 Feb; 34(2):105-114
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Amirhossein Modabbernia
Sven Sandin
Raz Gross
Helen Leonard
Mika Gissler
Erik T Parner
Richard Francis
Kim Carter
Michaeline Bresnahan
Diana Schendel
Mady Hornig
Abraham Reichenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Seaver Autism Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave L Levy PLC, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2019 Feb; 34(2):105-114
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Western Australia - epidemiology
Abstract
Low Apgar score has been associated with higher risk for several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. Studies of the association between Apgar score and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been inconsistent. We aimed to investigate (1) the association between low Apgar score at 5 min and risk for ASD, and (2) the modifying effects of gestational age and sex on this association in the largest multinational database of ASD. We included prospective data from 5.5 million individuals and over 33,000 cases of ASD from Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Western Australia who were born between 1984 and 2007. We calculated crude and adjusted risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the associations between low Apgar score and ASD. All analyses for ASD were repeated for autistic disorder (AD). We used interaction terms and stratified analysis to investigate the effects of sex, gestational age, and birth weight on the association. In fully adjusted models, low Apgar scores (1-3) (RR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.16-1.74), and intermediate Apgar scores (4-6) (RR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.36-1.65) were associated with a higher RR of ASD than optimal Apgar score (7-10). The point estimates for low (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.41-2.51) and intermediate Apgar score (RR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.32-1.81) were larger for AD than for ASD. This study suggests that low Apgar score is associated with higher risk of ASD, and in particular AD. We did not observe any major modifying effects of gestational age and sex, although there seems to be substantial confounding by gestational age and birth weight on the observed association.
PubMed ID
30291529 View in PubMed
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Apgar Score and Risk of Neonatal Death among Preterm Infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305386
Source
N Engl J Med. 2020 07 02; 383(1):49-57
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-02-2020
Author
Sven Cnattingius
Stefan Johansson
Neda Razaz
Author Affiliation
From the Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine Solna (S.C., S.J., N.R.), and the Department of Clinical Science and Education (S.J.), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
N Engl J Med. 2020 07 02; 383(1):49-57
Date
07-02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Apgar score
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Perinatal Death
Perinatal mortality
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Gestational age is the major determinant of neonatal death (death within the first 28 days of life) in preterm infants. The joint effect of gestational age and Apgar score on the risk of neonatal death is unknown.
Using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, we identified 113,300 preterm infants (22 weeks 0 days to 36 weeks 6 days of gestation) born from 1992 through 2016. In analyses stratified according to gestational age (22 to 24 weeks, 25 to 27 weeks, 28 to 31 weeks, 32 to 34 weeks, and 35 or 36 weeks), we estimated adjusted relative risks of neonatal death and absolute rate differences in neonatal mortality (i.e., the excess number of neonatal deaths per 100 births) according to the Apgar scores at 5 and 10 minutes and according to the change in the Apgar score between 5 minutes and 10 minutes. Scores range from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating a better physical condition of the newborn.
There were 1986 neonatal deaths (1.8%). The incidence of neonatal death ranged from 0.2% (at 36 weeks of gestation) to 76.5% (at 22 weeks of gestation). Lower Apgar scores were associated with higher relative risks of neonatal death and greater absolute rate differences in neonatal mortality in all gestational-age strata. For example, among infants born at 28 to 31 weeks, the adjusted absolute rate differences according to the 5-minute Apgar score, with those who had a score of 9 or 10 serving as the reference group, were 51.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 38.1 to 65.4) for a score of 0 or 1, 25.5 (95% CI, 18.3 to 32.8) for a score of 2 or 3, 7.1 (95% CI, 5.1 to 9.1) for a score of 4 to 6, and 1.2 (95% CI, 0.5 to 1.9) for a score of 7 or 8. An increase in the Apgar score between 5 minutes and 10 minutes was associated with lower neonatal mortality than a stable Apgar score.
In this study, Apgar scores at 5 and 10 minutes provided prognostic information about neonatal survival among preterm infants across gestational-age strata. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare and Karolinska Institutet.).
PubMed ID
32609981 View in PubMed
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Apgar-score in children prenatally exposed to antiepileptic drugs: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275041
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(9):e007425
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jakob Christensen
Henrik Søndergaard Pedersen
Maiken Ina Siegismund Kjaersgaard
Erik Thorlund Parner
Mogens Vestergaard
Merete Juul Sørensen
Jørn Olsen
Bodil Hammer Bech
Lars Henning Pedersen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(9):e007425
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticonvulsants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Apgar score
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
It is unknown if prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of low Apgar score in offspring.
Population-based study using health registers in Denmark.
We identified all 677 021 singletons born in Denmark from 1997 to 2008 and linked the Apgar score from the Medical Birth Register with information on the women's prescriptions for AEDs during pregnancy from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. We used the Danish National Hospital Registry to identify mothers diagnosed with epilepsy before birth of the child. Results were adjusted for smoking and maternal age.
Among 2906 children exposed to AEDs, 55 (1.9%) were born with an Apgar score =7 as compared with 8797 (1.3%) children among 674 115 pregnancies unexposed to AEDs (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.41 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.85). When analyses were restricted to the 2215 children born of mothers with epilepsy, the aRR of having a low Apgar score associated with AED exposure was 1.34 (95% CI 0.90 to 2.01) When assessing individual AEDs, we found increased, unadjusted RR for exposure to carbamazepine (RR=1.86 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.42)), valproic acid (RR=1.85 (95% CI 1.04 to 3.30)) and topiramate (RR=2.97 (95% CI 1.26 to 7.01)) when compared to unexposed children.
Prenatal exposure to AEDs was associated with increased risk of being born with a low Apgar score, but the absolute risk of a low Apgar score was
Notes
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PubMed ID
26359281 View in PubMed
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290 records – page 1 of 29.