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Female sex hormones and risk of incident abdominal aortic aneurysm in Norwegian women in the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310368
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2019 11; 70(5):1436-1445.e2
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2019
Author
Linn Åldstedt Nyrønning
Vibeke Videm
Pål R Romundstad
Rebecka Hultgren
Erney Mattsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: linn.aldstedt.nyronning@ntnu.no.
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2019 11; 70(5):1436-1445.e2
Date
11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Coronary Disease - blood - complications - epidemiology
Estradiol - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Hypertension - blood - complications - epidemiology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postmenopause - blood - drug effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - blood - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The delayed development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in women compared with men might be secondary to a protective effect from endogenous estrogens. The role of postmenopausal hormone therapy remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of female sex hormones compared with other risk factors associated with AAA through a long-term study of a large female cohort.
The present prospective cohort study included 20,024 postmenopausal women from the Norwegian Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. A total of 201 cases of AAA were identified during a median follow-up period of 18 years (295,554 person-years; 1995-2014). The data were recorded from questionnaires, physical measurements, medical records, blood sample test results, and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. The effect of risk factors was evaluated in a multiple Cox regression analysis. Multiple imputation was performed for missing data (n = 50 data sets). The serum estradiol concentrations in women with and without incidental AAAs were compared. The median interval from blood sample collection to the AAA diagnosis was 7 years.
Current smokers had >10-fold increased risk of incident AAA during the follow-up period (hazard ratio [HR], 10.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4-16.1). Positive associations were found for hypertension (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0) and coronary heart disease (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-3.2). The HR associated with the current use of postmenopausal hormone therapy was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.6-1.5). No substantial difference in estradiol concentrations was found between women with and without AAA (P = .075).
The effect of female sex hormones on the risk of incident AAAs in women, as evaluated by the serum concentrations of estradiol and the use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, is clinically less important than the strong associations found with smoking, hypertension, and coronary heart disease.
PubMed ID
31248762 View in PubMed
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Life-style factors and risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm in a cohort of Finnish male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196236
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Jan;12(1):94-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
M E Törnwall
J. Virtamo
J K Haukka
D. Albanes
J K Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Kansanterveyslaitos, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Jan;12(1):94-100
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Blood pressure
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Prospective studies evaluating risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysm are few. We studied the association of life-style factors with risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 29,133 male smokers 50-69 years of age, participants in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. During a mean follow-up of 5.8 years, 181 were diagnosed with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm or nonruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm plus aneurysmectomy. Risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm was positively associated with age [relative risk (RR) = 4.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.42-8.61 for > 65 vs 40 vs 160 vs 100 vs 6.5 vs 1.5 vs
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2001 Nov;12(6):75211679808
PubMed ID
11138827 View in PubMed
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