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Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anxiety-depressive disorders in elderly migrants of the far north in the period of re-adaptation to new climatic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266126
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(4):672-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
R A Iaskevich
I I Khamnagadaev
E V Dereviannykh
L S Polikarpov
N G Gogolashvili
E V Taptygina
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(4):672-7
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Cold Climate
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Russia
Sex Factors
Test Anxiety Scale
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
The article presents the results of studies of the anxious and depressed characteristics in elderly migrants of the Far North with arterial hypertension in the period of their stay in new climatic conditions with regard to their North experience, gender, age and timing of rehabilitation. There was a high frequency of disturbing-depressive symptomatology of the surveyed migrants in the Far North, the frequency and severity of which increases with age; women migrants of Far North are prone to depression 1,8 times, anxiety--3,2 times more often than men. With the increase of the period of stay in the new climate and geographical conditions, the severity and frequency of occurrence of anxiety and depression increase. The obtained results should be taken into account when building rehabilitation program and forecasting its effectiveness, while conducting psychotherapy and psychological prevention in this group of patients.
PubMed ID
25946842 View in PubMed
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Developmental course of anxiety and depression from adolescence to young adulthood in a prospective Norwegian clinical cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296643
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Nov; 27(11):1413-1423
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ingunn Ranøyen
Stian Lydersen
Tricia L Larose
Bernhard Weidle
Norbert Skokauskas
Per Hove Thomsen
Jan Wallander
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. ingunn.ranoyen@ntnu.no.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Nov; 27(11):1413-1423
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Anxiety and depression are often co-occurring disorders, reflecting both homotypic and heterotypic continuity as possible developmental pathways. The present study aimed to examine homotypic and heterotypic continuities of anxiety and depression across 3 years in adolescence and young adulthood. Participants included patients presenting to psychiatric care with diagnoses of anxiety and/or depressive disorders aged 13-18 at T1 (N = 717, 44% initial participation rate) and aged 16-21 at T2 (N = 549, 80% follow-up participation rate). McNemar's mid-p test and ordinal proportional odds logistic regression analyses were used to assess changes in prevalence within and across diagnostic categories, respectively. More adolescents had an anxiety disorder (+ 11%), whereas fewer had a depressive disorder (- 11%), at T2 compared to T1. Of adolescents with anxiety and/or depression at T1, only 25% recovered or were non-symptomatic 3 years after referral to a psychiatric clinic. Homotypic continuity was observed for anxiety disorders in general (OR = 2.33), for phobic anxiety disorders (OR = 7.45), and for depressive disorders (OR = 2.15). For heterotypic continuity, depression predicted later anxiety (OR = 1.92), more specifically social anxiety (OR = 2.14) and phobic anxiety disorders (OR = 1.83). In addition, social anxiety predicted later generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 3.11). Heterotypic continuity was thus more common than homotypic continuity. For adolescents presenting with anxiety or depression, treatment should, therefore, target broad internalizing symptom clusters, rather than individual diagnoses. This may contribute to prevent future mental illness, particularly anxiety, in clinical samples.
PubMed ID
29502316 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2010;110(5 Pt 2):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
V L Malygin
E E Pakhtusova
A B Iskandirova
D V Shevchenko
Iu A Shuliak
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2010;110(5 Pt 2):93-7
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Emotions
Humans
Physicians - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatry
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the prevalence, structure and risk factors of emotional burn-out in narcologists, 90 practitioners in the field of narcology were studied. Emotional burn-out syndrome was found in 37.7% of narcologists. The stage of "resistance" characterized by the lowered interest in professional duties, sparing of emotions and feeling of being tired from interpersonal contacts was observed most frequently. Emotions were totally removed from the professional activity at the stage of "exhaustion". The emotional burn-out syndrome was most prevalent within the first 10 years of professional activity. The personality factors increasing the risk of burn-out were increased impulsiveness, lowered control of motivations and incentives, increased rigidity, inertness of mental processes, inability to exclude the traumatic experiences. The ability to plan the problem solving process and act in a logic and consistent way decreased the risk of the burn-out syndrome while the increased self-control produced the increased level of anxiety and contributed to the burn-out syndrome.
PubMed ID
21322154 View in PubMed
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The experience of distress in relation to surgical treatment and care for breast cancer: An interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276410
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2015 Dec;19(6):612-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
L. Jørgensen
J P Garne
M. Søgaard
B S Laursen
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2015 Dec;19(6):612-8
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Body Image
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - psychology - surgery
Continuity of Patient Care
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Mastectomy - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
A diagnosis of breast cancer is a key turning point in a woman's life that may lead to her experiencing severe and persistent distress and potentially presaging a psychiatric disorder, such as major depression. In Denmark an increased standardization of care and a short hospital stay policy minimize the time of medical and nursing surveillance. Consequently, there is the potential risk that distress goes unnoticed, and therefore, untreated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the experience of distress in Danish women taking part in surgical continuity of care for breast cancer.
A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was conducted to explore the experience of distress in relation to surgical treatment and care for breast cancer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 women who recently had surgery for breast cancer at six departments of breast surgery in Denmark from May 2013 to November 2013.
The understanding of the experience of distress in the period of surgical continuity of care for breast cancer is augmented and improved through a discussion related to four identified themes: A time of anxiety, loss of identities, being treated as a person and being part of a system, drawing on theory and other research findings.
Distress experienced by women in the period following diagnosis arises from multiple sources. Support and care must be based on the woman's individual experience of distress.
PubMed ID
25963860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Homotypic and heterotypic continuity of symptoms of psychiatric disorders from age 4 to 10 years: a dynamic panel model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292262
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Nov; 58(11):1239-1247
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Lars Wichstrøm
Jay Belsky
Silje Steinsbekk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Nov; 58(11):1239-1247
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child, Preschool
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Childhood psychiatric disorders and their symptoms evince both within-disorder (homotypic) and between-disorder (heterotypic) continuities. These continuities may be due to earlier symptoms causing later symptoms or, alternatively, that the same (unknown) causes (e.g., genetics) are operating across time. Applying a novel data analytic approach, we disentangle these two explanations.
Participants in a Norwegian community study were assessed biennially from 4 to 10 years of age with clinical interviews (n = 1,042). Prospective reciprocal relations between symptoms of disorders were analyzed with a dynamic panel model within a structural equation framework, adjusting for all unmeasured time-invariant confounders and time-varying negative life-events.
Homotypic continuities in symptoms characterized all disorders; strongest for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (r = .32-.62), moderate for behavioral disorders (r = .31-.48) and for anxiety and depression (r = .15-.40), and stronger between 8 and 10 than between 4 and 6 years. Heterotypic continuity also characterized all disorders. A dynamic panel model showed that most continuities were due to unmeasured time-invariant factors rather than effects of earlier symptoms on later symptoms, although symptoms of behavioral disorders, which evinced two-year homotypic continuity (B = .14, 95% CI: .04, .25), did influence later symptoms of ADHD (B = .13, CI: .03, .23), and earlier ADHD symptoms influenced later anxiety disorder symptoms (B = .07, CI: .01, .12).
Homotypic and heterotypic continuities of symptoms of childhood psychiatric disorders are mostly due to unobserved time-invariant factors. Nonetheless, symptoms of earlier behavioral disorders may affect later symptoms of such disorders and of ADHD, and ADHD may increase the risk of later anxiety. Thus, even if interventions do not alter basic etiological factors, symptom reduction may itself cause later symptom reduction.
PubMed ID
28543077 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prenatal growth, postnatal growth and trait anxiety in late adulthood - the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149947
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Mar;121(3):227-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
J. Lahti
K. Räikkönen
A-K Pesonen
K. Heinonen
E. Kajantie
T. Forsén
C. Osmond
D J P Barker
J G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. jari.lahti@helsinki.fi
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Mar;121(3):227-35
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology - physiopathology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Body Size
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Human Development
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Trait anxiety may predispose to anxiety disorders and cardiovascular events. We tested whether prenatal growth or postnatal growth from birth to 11 years of age and in adulthood predict trait anxiety in late adulthood.
Women (n = 951) and men (n = 753) reported trait anxiety using the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Scale at an average age of 63.4 years and growth was estimated from records.
Higher trait anxiety was predicted by smaller body size at birth, in infancy and in adulthood. Moreover, faster growth particularly from seven to 11 years of age and slower growth between 11 and 63 years predicted higher trait anxiety.
We found a pattern of pre- and postnatal growth that predisposed to higher trait anxiety in late adulthood. This pattern resembles that found to increase the risk of cardiovascular events and, thus, points to a shared common origin in a suboptimal prenatal and childhood developmental milieu.
PubMed ID
19570107 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.