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Anxiety trajectories in the second half of life: Genetic and environmental contributions over age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278402
Source
Psychol Aging. 2016 Feb;31(1):101-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lewina O Lee
Margaret Gatz
Nancy L Pedersen
Carol A Prescott
Source
Psychol Aging. 2016 Feb;31(1):101-13
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Biometry
Cohort Studies
Death
Environment
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Individuality
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Twin Studies as Topic
Twins - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Clinically significant anxiety symptoms are prevalent among the elderly, yet knowledge about the longitudinal course of anxiety symptoms in later life remains scarce. The goals of this study were to (a) characterize age trajectories of state anxiety symptoms in the second half of life, and (b) estimate genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in the age trajectory of state anxiety. This study was based on data from 1,482 participants in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging who were aged 50 and older at their first occasion (512 complete twin pairs, 458 singletons) and had up to 6 measurement occasions spanning 11 years. Consistent with life span developmental theories of age-related emotional change, anxiety symptom levels declined during the transition from midlife to the mid-60s, followed by a mild increase that gradually plateaued in the 80s. There were substantial individual differences in the age trajectory of anxiety. After accounting for effects of sex, cohort, mode of testing, and proximity to death, this longitudinal variation was partitioned into biometric sources. Nonshared environmental variance was highest in the late 60s and declined thereafter, whereas genetic variance increased at an accelerated pace from approximately age 60 onward. There was no evidence for effects of rearing or other shared environment on anxiety symptoms in later life. These findings highlight how the etiology of anxiety symptoms changes from midlife to old age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26751006 View in PubMed
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Assessment of physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders in structured diagnostic interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164012
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne V A Williams
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary (AB) Canada T2N 4N1. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Episode of Care
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Assessment
Syndrome
Abstract
Structured diagnostic inter- views include items that evaluate physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders. The objective of this article was to assess the impact of such items.
A mental health survey in Canada collected data from n = 36,984 household residents. The lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders was calculated with and without exclusions due to physical causes.
Approximately 10% of subjects with a lifetime depressive disorder reported that all of their episodes were due to one or more physical cause. Many of the reported etiologies were implausible given the DSM-IV requirement that the disturbance be a "direct physiological consequence" of the physical cause. The results were similar for manic episodes and anxiety disorders.
Structured diagnostic interviews assess physical etiologies in ways that are subject to inconsistency and inaccuracy. Physical etiology items may bias estimates by introducing etiological opinions into the assessment of disorder frequency.
PubMed ID
17450450 View in PubMed
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The burden of lower urinary tract symptoms: evaluating the effect of LUTS on health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression: EpiLUTS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89477
Source
BJU Int. 2009 Apr;103 Suppl 3:4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Coyne Karin S
Wein Alan J
Tubaro Andrea
Sexton Chris C
Thompson Christine L
Kopp Zoe S
Aiyer Lalitha P
Author Affiliation
United BioSource Corporation, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA. Karin.Coyne@unitedbiosource.com
Source
BJU Int. 2009 Apr;103 Suppl 3:4-11
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
United States - epidemiology
Urination Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) on urinary-specific health-related quality of life (HRQL), generic health indices, depression and anxiety in a population-representative sample of men and women, as research has linked LUTS with reduced HRQL and depression, but little is known about the effects of individual LUTS on HRQL, depression and anxiety. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional population-representative survey was conducted via the Internet in the USA, the UK and Sweden. Participants rated the frequency and symptom-specific bother of individual LUTS and condition-specific HRQL, generic health status, anxiety and depression. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate outcome differences by International Continence Society LUTS subgroups; logistic regressions were used to determine associations of LUTS and perception of bladder problems, anxiety and depression. RESULTS: The overall survey response rate was 59.2%; 30 000 subjects (14 139 men and 15 861 women) participated. Men and women with LUTS in the all LUTS subgroup (storage, voiding and postmicturition) reported the lowest levels of HRQL and highest levels of anxiety and depression, with 35.9% of men and 53.3% of women meeting self-reported screening criteria for clinical anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS, Anxiety > or =8), and 29.8% of men and 37.6% of women meeting self-reported criteria for clinical depression (HADS Depression > or =8). In both men and women, storage symptoms were significantly associated with greater perceived bladder impact, whereas voiding symptoms were not. Significant predictors of anxiety included nocturia, urgency, stress urinary incontinence, leaking during sexual activity, weak stream and split stream in women; and nocturia, urgency, incomplete emptying and bladder pain in men. For depression, weak stream, urgency and stress urinary incontinence were significant for women, and perceived frequency and incomplete emptying were significant for men. CONCLUSION: The negative effect of LUTS is apparent across several domains of HRQL and on overall perception of bladder problems, general health status and mental health. The high level of psychiatric morbidity in patients with multiple LUTS has important implications for treatment and highlights the need for further research to pinpoint specific mechanisms underlying this association.
PubMed ID
19302497 View in PubMed
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The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid anxiety disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127358
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):6-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Ayal Schaffer
Diane McIntosh
Benjamin I Goldstein
Neil A Rector
Roger S McIntyre
Serge Beaulieu
Richard Swinson
Lakshmi N Yatham
Author Affiliation
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ayal.schaffer@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):6-22
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Advisory Committees
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Canada
Child
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Humans
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Abstract
Comorbid mood and anxiety disorders are commonly seen in clinical practice. The goal of this article is to review the available literature on the epidemiologic, etiologic, clinical, and management aspects of this comorbidity and formulate a set of evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. This article is part of a set of Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) Comorbidity Task Force papers.
We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and November 2010. The search terms were bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, cross-referenced with anxiety disorders/symptoms, panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Levels of evidence for specific interventions were assigned based on a priori determined criteria, and recommendations were developed by integrating the level of evidence and clinical opinion of the authors.
Comorbid anxiety symptoms and disorders have a significant impact on the clinical presentation and treatment approach for patients with mood disorders. A set of recommendations are provided for the management of bipolar disorder (BD) with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) with comorbid anxiety with a focus on comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, use of cognitive-behavioral therapy across mood and anxiety disorders, and youth with mood and anxiety disorders.
Careful attention should be given to correctly identifying anxiety comorbidities in patients with BD or MDD. Consideration of evidence- or consensus-based treatment recommendations for the management of both mood and anxiety symptoms is warranted.
PubMed ID
22303519 View in PubMed
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Cross cultural evaluation of smokers risk for panic and anxiety pathology: a test in a Russian epidemiological sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183664
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Oct;41(10):1199-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Michael J Zvolensky
Roman Kotov
Anna V Antipova
Norman B Schmidt
Author Affiliation
The University of Vermont, Department of Psychology, John Dewey Hall, Burlington, VT 05405-0134, USA. mzvolen@dewey.uvm.edu
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2003 Oct;41(10):1199-215
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Agoraphobia - epidemiology - etiology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The present study evaluated the main and interactive effects of level of smoking (cigarettes per day) and anxiety sensitivity (fear of anxiety and anxiety related sensations) in predicting panic and anxiety variables in an epidemiologically-defined sample of smokers from Moscow (n=95). The combination of high levels of anxiety sensitivity and smoking predicted agoraphobic avoidance, but not frequency of panic attacks during the past week. These findings suggest anxiety sensitivity may moderate the relation between level of smoking and prototypical panic psychopathology variables (panic attacks and agoraphobic avoidance) even after controlling for the theoretically-relevant factors of alcohol abuse and negative affect.
PubMed ID
12971940 View in PubMed
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Fatigue before and after mild traumatic brain injury: pre-post-injury comparisons in relation to Apolipoprotein E.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94017
Source
Brain Inj. 2007 Sep;21(10):1049-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Sundström A.
Nilsson L-G
Cruts M.
Adolfsson R.
Van Broeckhoven C.
Nyberg L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. anna.sundstrom@psy.umu.se
Source
Brain Inj. 2007 Sep;21(10):1049-54
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Brain Injuries - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of fatigue for persons following a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to evaluate the relationship between fatigue and APOE genotype. As fatigue is often found to be influenced by anxiety, depression and sleep disturbance, these factors were also measured. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Thirty-one persons who sustained a MTBI were drawn from a population-based longitudinal study. Each person who sustained a MTBI was matched by age, gender, education and APOE genotype with two non-head injury controls. Self-reported pre- and post-injury incidence of fatigue, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbance was compared within-group and between groups. RESULTS: For the MTBI group, incidence of fatigue was almost twice as common post- than pre-injury, whereas there was no corresponding change in a non-injured control group. Within the MTBI-group, post-injury fatigue was particularly common for carriers of the APOE epsilon4 allele. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is common sequela after a MTBI and especially pronounced for carriers of the APOE epsilon4 allele.
PubMed ID
17891567 View in PubMed
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Is childhood physical abuse associated with anxiety disorders among adults?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123639
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2012;17(6):735-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
E. Fuller-Thomson
H R Sohn
S. Brennenstuhl
T M Baker
Author Affiliation
Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. esme.fuller.thomson@utoronto.ca
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2012;17(6):735-46
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Abuse
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Several studies have examined the association between childhood physical abuse (CPA) and anxiety disorders with inconsistent results. In order to help clarify this relationship, we investigated the association between CPA and current anxiety disorders while controlling for the following groups of factors: (1) demographics; (2) family background; (3) current socioeconomic status (SES); (4) current stressors; and (5) current mood disorders. Data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed. The sample included 12,481 respondents from the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The regional-level response rate was 84%. Fully 7.3% (n = 964) of respondents reported they had been physically abused as a child or adolescent by someone close to them and 4.4% (n = 540) reported they had been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder by a health professional. A significant association between CPA and anxiety disorders was found when controlling for demographic factors, family background, current SES and stressors (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.25, 2.08). The odds of anxiety disorders declined to non-significance when further statistical adjustments were made for current mood disorders. The findings of this research suggest that the relationship between CPA and anxiety may be largely explained by co-morbid mood disorders.
PubMed ID
22681187 View in PubMed
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Mental disorders in a population sample with musculoskeletal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169599
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2006;7:37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne Va Williams
JianLi Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2006;7:37
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Arthritis - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Rheumatic Diseases - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Studies using clinical and volunteer samples have reported an elevated prevalence of mood disorders in association with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Clinical studies using anxiety rating scales have reported inconsistent results, but studies using diagnostic instruments have reported that anxiety disorders may be even more strongly associated with arthritis than is depression. One study reported an association between lifetime substance use disorders and arthritis.
Data from iteration 1.2 of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) were used. This was a large-scale national Canadian health survey which administered the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview to a sample of 36,984 subjects randomly selected from the national population. In the CCHS 1.2, subjects were asked whether they had been diagnosed by a health professional with arthritis or rheumatism.
Subjects reporting arthritis or rheumatism had an elevated prevalence of mood, anxiety and substance use disorders. The strength of association resembled that seen in an omnibus category reporting any chronic condition, but was weaker than that seen with back pain or fibromyalgia. The effect of arthritis or rheumatism interacted with age, such that the odds ratios became smaller with increasing age. Mood and anxiety disorders, along with arthritis or rheumatism made an independent contribution to disability.
Arthritis is associated with psychiatric morbidity in the general population, and this morbidity is seen across a variety of mental disorders. The strength of association is consistent with that seen in persons with other self-reported medical conditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16638139 View in PubMed
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[Neuropsychic state in convicts with tuberculosis at different penitentiaries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158411
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2007;(12):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
A N Zarbuev
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2007;(12):30-4
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Prisons - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The neuropsychic studies in convicts suggest that human exposure to multiple factors induces a severe acute stress that accordingly results in neuropsychic disorders and in more significant disruption of the body's performance. Due to the fact that tuberculosis occupies a certain place among all diseases; learning about his being ill becomes a much stronger psychotraumatizing factor to the convict. A combined exposure to various factors, including the disease itself, influences convicts' emotional reaction and has serious personality consequences that appear as altered mental state and limited social activity; as well as difficult adaptation to new living conditions and all these factors substantially influence the course and outcome of the disease.
PubMed ID
18326213 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.