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The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia and somatization in general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156341
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Jul;70(6):716-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Aino K Mattila
Erkki Kronholm
Antti Jula
Jouko K Salminen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Riitta-Liisa Mielonen
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Jul;70(6):716-22
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sentinel Surveillance
Socioeconomic Factors
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Even though the association between alexithymia and somatization seems plausible according to several studies with selected populations, it has not been verified in carefully controlled and nationally representative population studies. We conducted such a study to find out whether alexithymia is associated with somatization at population level.
This study was a part of the Finnish Health 2000 Study. The nationally representative sample comprised 5129 subjects aged 30 to 97 years. Alexithymia was measured with the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and somatic symptom reporting with the 12-item somatization scale derived from the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Sociodemographic and health-related variables, including depressive and anxiety disorders, and physician verified somatic diagnoses, were treated as confounders in multivariate analyses.
Alexithymia was associated with somatization independently of somatic diseases, depression and anxiety and confounding sociodemographic variables. The TAS-20 factor scale "Difficulties Identifying Feelings" was the strongest common denominator between alexithymia and somatization.
This was the first time the independent association between alexithymia and somatization was established in a large, nationally representative nonclinical sample of both young and old adults with and without mental disorders and somatic diseases.
PubMed ID
18596251 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia is associated with anxiety among adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144773
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Sep;125(1-3):383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Max Karukivi
Lea Hautala
Olli Kaleva
Kirsi-Maria Haapasalo-Pesu
Pirjo-Riitta Liuksila
Matti Joukamaa
Simo Saarijärvi
Author Affiliation
Unit of Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland. max.karukivi@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Sep;125(1-3):383-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Eating Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between alexithymia and anxiety in a non-clinical sample of late adolescents.
The questionnaire was sent to 935 adolescents of whom 729 (78%) responded, thus forming the final sample. The mean age of the subjects was 19 years (range 17-21 years). The Finnish versions of the following scales were used: the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) was used to assess alexithymia, and anxiety symptoms were measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Alcohol consumption was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and depression symptoms were evaluated using the short form of the Beck Depression Inventory, as modified by Raitasalo (RBDI).
The prevalence of alexithymia in the sample was 8.2%, with no statistically significant gender difference. The alexithymic subjects had significantly (p
PubMed ID
20303180 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depressive symptoms related to parenthood in a large Norwegian community sample: the HUNT2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149184
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;45(7):713-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Tormod Rimehaug
Jan Wallander
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7489, Trondheim, Norway. Tormod.Rimehaug@ntnu.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;45(7):713-21
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Data Collection
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marriage - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Single Person - psychology
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study compared anxiety and depression prevalence between parents and non-parents in a society with family- and parenthood-friendly social politics, controlling for family status and family history, age, gender, education and social class.
All participants aged 30-49 (N = 24,040) in the large, non-sampled Norwegian HUNT2 community health study completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales.
The slightly elevated anxiety and depression among non-parents compared to parents in the complete sample was not confirmed as statistically significant within any subgroups. Married parents and (previously unmarried) cohabiting parents did not differ in portraying low anxiety and depression prevalence. Anxiety was associated with single parenthood, living alone or being divorced, while elevated depression was found only among those living alone.
Burdening selection and cultural/political context are suggested as interpretative perspectives on the contextual and personal influences on the complex relationship between parenthood and mental health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19669679 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression, and 1-year incident cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132631
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Olivier Potvin
Hélène Forget
Sébastien Grenier
Michel Préville
Carol Hudon
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Olivier.Potvin@crulrg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1421-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Independent Living - psychology
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quebec
Abstract
To examine in men and women the independent associations between anxiety and depression and 1-year incident cognitive impairment and to examine the association of cognitive impairment, no dementia (CIND) and incident cognitive impairment with 1-year incident anxiety or depression.
Prospective cohort study.
General community.
Population-based sample of 1,942 individuals aged 65 to 96.
Two structured interviews 12 months apart evaluated anxiety and mood symptoms and disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria. Incident cognitive impairment was defined as no CIND at baseline and a follow-up Mini-Mental State Examination score at least 2 points below baseline and below the 15th percentile according to normative data. The associations between cognitive impairment and anxiety or depression were assessed using logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.
Incident cognitive impairment was, independently of depression, associated with baseline anxiety disorders in men (odds ratio (OR)=6.27, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.39-28.29) and anxiety symptoms in women (OR=2.14, 95%=1.06-4.34). Moreover, the results indicated that depression disorders in men (OR=8.87, 95%=2.13-36.96) and anxiety symptoms in women (OR=4.31, 95%=1.74-10.67) were particularly linked to incident amnestic cognitive impairment, whereas anxiety disorders in men (OR=12.01, 95%=1.73-83.26) were especially associated with incident nonamnestic cognitive impairment. CIND at baseline and incident cognitive impairment were not associated with incident anxiety or depression.
Anxiety and depression appear to have different relationships with incident cognitive impairment according to sex and the nature of cognitive impairment. Clinicians should pay particular attention to anxiety in older adults because it may shortly be followed by incident cognitive treatment.
PubMed ID
21797836 View in PubMed
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Anxiety disorders and anxiety symptoms in a clinic sample of seasonal and non-seasonal depressives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221171
Source
J Affect Disord. 1993 May;28(1):51-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A J Levitt
R T Joffe
D. Brecher
C. MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Mood Disorders Program, Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1993 May;28(1):51-6
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Personality Inventory
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Thirty-eight patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) were compared with 33 non-seasonal recurrent major depressives (non-SAD) who presented during the winter months for differences in the prevalence of concurrent anxiety disorders and the impact of anxiety on treatment response. SAD patients received light therapy, whereas non-SAD patients received antidepressant medications. There was no differences in the prevalence of any anxiety disorder, or on scores of anxiety on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression between the SAD and non-SAD groups. The presence of any anxiety disorder was associated with a better response rate in SAD patients, and an inferior response rate in non-SAD patients. The findings refute previous suggestions that anxiety is more common in SAD than in non-SAD, but suggest that the presence of anxiety may be associated with differential treatment response rates.
PubMed ID
8326080 View in PubMed
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Anxiety in early pregnancy: prevalence and contributing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105226
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Jun;17(3):221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
C. Rubertsson
J. Hellström
M. Cross
G. Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uppsala University, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Jun;17(3):221-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Maternal Age
Parturition - psychology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Antenatal anxiety symptoms are not only a health problem for the expectant mother. Research has found that maternal anxiety may also have an impact on the developing baby. Therefore, it is important to estimate the prevalence of maternal anxiety and associated factors. The current study aims to estimate the prevalence of anxiety symptoms during the first trimester of pregnancy and to identify associated risk factors. Secondly, to investigate other factors associated with anxiety during early pregnancy including fear of childbirth and a preference for cesarean section. In a population-based community sample of 1,175 pregnant women, 916 women (78%) were investigated in the first trimester (gestation week 8-12). The Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS-A) was used to measure anxiety symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A scores=8 during pregnancy) was 15.6% in early pregnancy. Women under 25 years of age were at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy (OR 2.6, CI 1.7-4.0). Women who reported a language other than Swedish as their native language (OR 4.2, CI 2.7-7.0), reported high school as their highest level of education (OR 1.6, CI 1.1-2.3), were unemployed (OR 3.5, CI 2.1-5.8), used nicotine before pregnancy (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.5), and had a self-reported psychiatric history of either depression (OR 3.8, CI 2.6-5.6) or anxiety (OR 5.2, CI 3.5-7.9) before their current pregnancy were all at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy. Anxiety symptoms during pregnancy increased the rate of fear of birth (OR 3.0, CI 1.9-4.7) and a preference for cesarean section (OR 1.7, CI 1.0-2.8). Caregivers should pay careful attention to history of mental illness to be able to identify women with symptoms of anxiety during early pregnancy. When presenting with symptoms of anxiety, the women might need counseling and or treatment in order to decrease her anxiety.
PubMed ID
24442712 View in PubMed
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Are early and current erectile problems associated with anxiety and depression in young men? A retrospective self-report study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123276
Source
J Sex Marital Ther. 2012;38(4):349-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Patrick Jern
Annika Gunst
Kenneth Sandnabba
Pekka Santtila
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Turku, Finland. pjern@abo.fi
Source
J Sex Marital Ther. 2012;38(4):349-64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Coitus - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Erectile Dysfunction - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been extensively studied in the past few decades, and significant advances have been made in understanding its etiology. Most cases of this type of dysfunction have an organic etiology, and ED occurs primarily in older men. However, relatively little is known about erectile problems in young men or about the interconnection between psychiatric symptoms and ED etiology. In this study, the authors investigated ED symptoms in a large, population-based sample of 18-48-year-old men. Participants reported ED symptoms from their first intercourse experience as well as those occurring at present. The authors assessed the association between reported ED symptoms during early partnered sexual experiences and present ED symptoms. Furthermore, the authors investigated associations between age, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and erectile problems. Results indicated that age was a significant predictor of ED problems already in young age groups. ED problems were prevalent to a much higher extent during early sexual intercourse experiences and appeared to pass with time for most men. Anxiety and depression were significant predictors of present erectile problems. Implications of the results and potential limitations were discussed.
PubMed ID
22712819 View in PubMed
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[Barriers to treatment access reported by people with anxiety disorders].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113187
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 May;58(5):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Michel Perreault
David Lafortune
Anick Laverdure
Mariko Chartier-Otis
Claude Bélanger
André Marchand
Stéphane Bouchard
Diana Milton
Author Affiliation
Université McGill, Montréal, Québec. michel.perreault@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 May;58(5):300-5
Date
May-2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Chi-Square Distribution
Communication Barriers
Community Mental Health Services - standards
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Preference - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Our study examined the barriers to treatment experienced by people with anxiety disorders (ADs) who had not received services for their problems. Recommendations to improve treatment access made by participants are reported.
A web-based questionnaire on treatment accessibility for anxiety disorders was completed by 610 people living in Quebec reporting an anxiety problem. Chi-square tests were used to compare answers from people who received services (n = 151) with answers from people who had not (n = 434 ).
Treatment wait times that were too long (X2 = 29.66, df = 1, P
PubMed ID
23756290 View in PubMed
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The Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II): psychometric properties in Icelandic student and patient populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92309
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(5):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Arnarson Thornorethur Orn
Olason Daníel Thorn
Smári Jakob
Sigurethsson Jón Friethrik
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(5):360-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Patients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is one of the most widely used self-report measures of depression in both research and clinical practice. The Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II) is the most recent version of the BDI. The objective of the present study was to assess the psychometric foundations of the Icelandic translation of the BDI-II, adding to its international knowledge base. Participants were in total 1454, 1206 students and 248 outpatient-clinic patients. All students completed the BDI-II and a subgroup (n=142) completed additional measures of anxiety and depression. The Mini-International Psychiatric Interview (MINI) and the BDI-II were administrated to the patients. Convergent and divergent validity of the BDI-II were supported. It discriminated satisfactorily between patients diagnosed and those not diagnosed with major depression. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed small differences between various factor models of the BDI-II, derived from previous studies. However, a model of three first-order factors (cognitive-affective-somatic) and one second-order factor (general depression) offered an acceptable description of the item covariance structure for the BDI-II in both samples. It is concluded that the psychometric properties of the Icelandic version of the BDI-II are supported in patient and student populations.
PubMed ID
18752106 View in PubMed
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80 records – page 1 of 8.