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Age-specific associations between dental fear and dental condition among adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92390
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Oct;66(5):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Pohjola Vesa
Lahti Satu
Vehkalahti Miira M
Tolvanen Mimmi
Hausen Hannu
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. vesa.pohjola@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Oct;66(5):278-85
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Caries - complications - psychology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Loss - complications - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study whether dental condition, measured by numbers of sound, decayed, missing, and restored teeth, was associated with dental fear, and whether age, dental attendance, and/or gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample (n=8,028) comprised Finnish adults aged 30 years and older and the study included people (n=6,335) who participated in a home interview and a clinical dental examination. Dental fear was measured by the question: "How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?" Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between dental fear and dental condition variables, i.e. numbers of decayed, missing, sound, and restored teeth considering the effects of age, attendance, and gender. RESULTS: With the exception of number of restored teeth, all dental condition variables were associated with dental fear. The association between dental fear and number of decayed teeth was positive and was independent of age, gender, and attendance. Age modified the association between dental fear and number of missing and sound teeth. Among the oldest age group, the numbers of missing and sound teeth were positively associated with dental fear while being negatively associated among the youngest age group. CONCLUSIONS: People with high dental fear have poorer dental condition than those with lower fear. Neither gender nor dental attendance affects the association between dental fear and dental condition. The associations between dental fear and numbers of missing and sound teeth vary according to year of birth.
PubMed ID
18720054 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression associated with urinary incontinence. A 10-year follow-up study from the Norwegian HUNT study (EPINCONT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287573
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 Feb;36(2):322-328
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Gunhild Felde
Marit Helen Ebbesen
Steinar Hunskaar
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 Feb;36(2):322-328
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Norway
Prevalence
Risk factors
Urinary Incontinence - complications - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Firstly, to investigate the association between depression, anxiety and urinary incontinence (UI) in a 10-year longitudinal study of women. Secondly, to investigate the association between possible differences in the stress- and urgency components of UI and different severities of depression and anxiety by age groups.
In a longitudinal, population-based survey study, the EPINCONT part of the HUNT study in Norway, we analyzed questionnaire data on UI, depression and anxiety from 16,263 women from 20 years of age. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of developing anxiety and depression among the women with and without UI at baseline and the odds of developing UI among the women with and without anxiety or depression at baseline.
For women with any UI at baseline we found an association with the incidence of depression and anxiety symptoms, OR 1.45 (1.23-1.72) and 1.26 (1.8-1.47) for mild depression and anxiety respectively. For women with depression or anxiety symptoms at baseline we found an association with the incidence of any UI with OR 2.09 (1.55-2.83) and 1.65 (1.34-2.03) for moderate/severe symptom-score for depression and anxiety, respectively, for the whole sample.
In this study, both depression and anxiety are shown to be risk factors for developing UI with a dose-dependent trend. UI is associated with increased incidence of depression and anxiety. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:322-328, 2017. © 2015 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
26584597 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and/or depression in 10-15-year-olds investigated by child welfare in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135198
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2011 May;48(5):493-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Lil Tonmyr
Gabriela Williams
Wendy E Hovdestad
Jasminka Draca
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, 200 Eglantine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Lil.Tonmyr@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2011 May;48(5):493-8
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - classification - psychology
Child Welfare
Databases, Factual
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Abstract
To examine five types of child maltreatment and other risk correlates to establish associations with anxiety and/or depression confirmed or suspected in children investigated by child welfare services.
The present study used the data of a subsample of 10-15-year-olds (n = 4,381) investigated by child welfare services across Canada obtained from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2003. The analysis took into account the nested structure of the data by considering the variability existing among families and the clustering of siblings within them. Several models were analyzed for the construction of the presented hierarchical model. Striving for parsimony, we included only statistically significant variables in the final model.
The strongest associations were found with child substance abuse, substantiated emotional maltreatment, primary caregiver's mental health problems, and substantiated sexual abuse. Among the child maltreatment variables, substantiated physical abuse and substantiated exposure to domestic violence did not show any statistically significant associations with anxiety and/or depression in the model.
This analysis helped us in understanding child maltreatment and other adverse experiences in childhood that were related to anxiety and/or depression, which can further aid in the development of mental health and child welfare policies and programs.
PubMed ID
21501809 View in PubMed
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[Anxiety-depressive States in elderly patients with chronic heart failure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119477
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(10):26-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
V N Larina
B Ia Bart
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(10):26-33
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Educational Status
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Heart Failure - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Aim of the study was determination of factors of social desadaptation, which negatively affect psychoemotional status and quality of life of elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We included into the study 248 patients aged 60-85 years and 82 patients aged 39-59 years with NYHA class II-IV CHF. General state of patients we assessed with the help of clinical state assessment scale (CSAS), presence and severity of anxiety and depression -with hospital anxiety and depression scale, exercise tolerance - with 6 minute walk test. Patients of both groups were comparable by sex, severity of the CHF course quality of life, concomitant pathology, and treatment. Clinically manifest depression was found in 22.8% of patients aged 60 years and older and in 16% of patients younger than 60 years (p=0.460), clinically manifest anxiety was found in 22.8% and 20%, respectively (p=0.945). Risk factors of anxiety-depressive state in elderly patients were disability (relative risk [RR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-8.97, p =0.042), insufficient education (RR 2.44, 95%CI 1.08-5.34; p=0.0320, and severe CHF according to CSAS (OR 1.22, 95%CI 1.07-1.4; p=0.003). According to data of multifactorial analysis disability (RR 1.78, 95%CI 1.01-3.13; p=0.045) and severe CHF (RR 1.17, 95%CI 1.07-1.27; p=0.001) were independently related to anxiety-depressive state in elderly patients.
Thus social dysadaptation and medical factors turned out to be leading parameters determining worsening of quality of life and development of anxiety-depressive state in elderly patients with CHF.
PubMed ID
23098347 View in PubMed
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Anxiety is contagious-symptoms of anxiety in the terminally ill child affect long-term psychological well-being in bereaved parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98147
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 May;54(5):751-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Li Jalmsell
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Erik Onelöv
Gunnar Steineck
Jan-Inge Henter
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 May;54(5):751-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Bereavement
Child
Child, Preschool
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We studied the relation between unrelieved symptoms in terminally ill children and the psychological well-being in the bereaved parents 4-9 years after their loss. PROCEDURE: We contacted parents in Sweden who had lost a child to a malignancy 1992-1997. The parents were asked to assess symptoms affecting their child's well-being during his or her last month of life, and their own current psychological well-being. RESULTS: Altogether 449/561 (80%) eligible parents supplied information on 19 specific symptoms that may occur in children with a malignancy and how each of these symptoms had affected their child's well-being during his or her last month of life (not applicable, none, low, moderate, or severe). These results were linked to questions concerning the parents' self-assessed mental health. Parents of children who were affected by disturbed sleep also had increased risk to develop these symptoms; RR 2.0 [1.4-2.9] for depression, 1.8 [1.3-2.5] for anxiety, 1.5 [1.2-1.8] for decreased psychological well-being, and 1.5 [1.3-1.9] for decreased quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Bereaved parents whose children were affected by anxiety or disturbed sleep due to anxiety or pain had an increased risk of long-term psychological morbidity. Reducing psychological complications in seriously ill children may also improve the psychological well-being in bereaved parents.
PubMed ID
20135696 View in PubMed
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Anxiety sensitivity and obsessive--compulsive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158535
Source
Assessment. 2008 Sep;15(3):351-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
John E Calamari
Neil A Rector
John L Woodard
Robyn J Cohen
Heather M Chik
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA. John.Calamari@rosalindfranklin.edu
Source
Assessment. 2008 Sep;15(3):351-63
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental health
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Anxiety sensitivity (AS), a cognitive risk factor for anxiety disorders, was evaluated in a homogeneous obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) sample. A total of 280 individuals with OCD completed measures. Evaluation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index revealed a latent structure that was congruent with previous studies showing a single higher order and three lower order factors, although greater variance was accounted for by the general factor than in a previous study. AS was significantly associated with OCD symptom severity after controlling for other putative cognitive risk factors, although the additional variance explained was small. Variability in the relationship of AS to OCD symptom severity was found across OCD symptom subgroups. Results suggest that AS might be an important aspect of OCD-relevant cognition for specific OCD subgroups, and the need for experimental evaluation is discussed.
PubMed ID
18310595 View in PubMed
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Anxiety trajectories in the second half of life: Genetic and environmental contributions over age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278402
Source
Psychol Aging. 2016 Feb;31(1):101-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lewina O Lee
Margaret Gatz
Nancy L Pedersen
Carol A Prescott
Source
Psychol Aging. 2016 Feb;31(1):101-13
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - genetics - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Biometry
Cohort Studies
Death
Environment
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Individuality
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Twin Studies as Topic
Twins - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Clinically significant anxiety symptoms are prevalent among the elderly, yet knowledge about the longitudinal course of anxiety symptoms in later life remains scarce. The goals of this study were to (a) characterize age trajectories of state anxiety symptoms in the second half of life, and (b) estimate genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in the age trajectory of state anxiety. This study was based on data from 1,482 participants in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging who were aged 50 and older at their first occasion (512 complete twin pairs, 458 singletons) and had up to 6 measurement occasions spanning 11 years. Consistent with life span developmental theories of age-related emotional change, anxiety symptom levels declined during the transition from midlife to the mid-60s, followed by a mild increase that gradually plateaued in the 80s. There were substantial individual differences in the age trajectory of anxiety. After accounting for effects of sex, cohort, mode of testing, and proximity to death, this longitudinal variation was partitioned into biometric sources. Nonshared environmental variance was highest in the late 60s and declined thereafter, whereas genetic variance increased at an accelerated pace from approximately age 60 onward. There was no evidence for effects of rearing or other shared environment on anxiety symptoms in later life. These findings highlight how the etiology of anxiety symptoms changes from midlife to old age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26751006 View in PubMed
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[Anxious depressive conditions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158073
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2008;86(2):59-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
N S Lapina
N N Borovkov
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2008;86(2):59-62
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors objectively evaluated the presence of anxious depressive conditions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and studied associations between them and the clinical picture of the disease. Ninety-one patients with GERD were examined. The diagnosis was based on clinical and anamnestic data as well as the results of esophagogastroduodenoscopy and rabeprazole test. Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was used to assess the severity of GERD symptoms and quality of life. Beck Scale was applied to assess the level of depression. Spielberg test was used to assess reactive and personal anxiety. The psychological status of GERD patients was studied before the beginning of the treatment. Tests and questionnaires were filled by patients on their own. Spielberg test and Beck Scale revealed a high prevalence of psychopathic syndromes among GERD patients. Forty-three per cent of patients had anxious syndrome, while 57% of patients suffered from anxious depressive syndrome; the anxiety level and depression level were clinically significant in 70% of cases and in 23%, respectively. The presence of a direct correlation between the severity of the psychopathological syndromes (according to Spielberg test and Beck Scale) and GSRS data demonstrate that anxiety and depression intensify GERD symptoms and lower the quality of life of these patients. There is no doubt that concomitant anxious and anxious-depressive disturbances need psychotherapeutic and drug correction. Tranquilizers have the priority in neurotic anxious disturbances. In some situations antidepressants are indicated to treat a combination of anxious disturbances and depressive ones.
PubMed ID
18368796 View in PubMed
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Cancer anxiety and attitudes toward mammography among screening attenders, nonattenders, and women never invited

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24517
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1992 Feb;82(2):249-251
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
  1 website  
Author
Gram, IT
Slenker, SE
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsö, Norway
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1992 Feb;82(2):249-251
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology - radiography
False Positive Reactions
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Mammography - psychology
Mass Screening - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
A mailed questionnaire survey was conducted among the following groups: 179 women who screened false positive at a free mammography screening; a random sample of 250 women who screened negative; 670 nonattenders of the screening; and a random population sample of 250 women who lived in another city and were not invited, but were otherwise comparable. The most frequently reported reason for nonattendance was not having the opportunity. Furthermore, only 18% of the nonattenders reported anxiety about breast cancer compared with 33% of the population sample (P less than .05). Ninety-nine percent of the women who attended indicated a positive attitude toward mammography that had not been adversely affected by screening experiences.
PubMed ID
1739156 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Childhood abuse and later worries about the baby's health in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139985
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Dec;89(12):1523-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Jorid Eide
Ragnhild Hovengen
Rannveig Nordhagen
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, The Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. jorid.eide@fhi.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Dec;89(12):1523-31
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
to explore the associations between sexual and/or physical abuse in childhood and worries about the baby's health in pregnancy.
cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting. Norwegian prospective pregnancy cohort.
an original sample of 58,139 pregnancies (1999-2006) covering about 43% of the pregnant population.
two self-reported questionnaires in the 17th and 30th week of gestation were merged with data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Associations between physical and/or sexual childhood abuse and worries about the baby's health were assessed with multiple logistic regression analyses.
strong worries about the baby's health in the 30th week of gestation among women with experience of childhood abuse.
women who reported being exposed to physical or sexual childhood abuse or a combination of the two were at increased risk of strong worries about the baby's health compared to women who had not been similarly exposed (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-2.08; adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.64; adjusted OR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.68-2.62, respectively). Marital status, adult abuse, pelvic pain, quality of antenatal care, self-efficacy and previous birth experiences were also associated with concern about the baby's health.
there were significant associations between physical and/or sexual childhood abuse and strong concern about the baby's health. Worries about the baby's health are complex and associated with many elements of risk.
PubMed ID
20958251 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.