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A 12-year Trend of Psychological Distress: National Study of Finnish University Students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285639
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Airi Oksanen
Katri Laimi
Katja Björklund
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kristina Kunttu
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
The study aimed to explore changes in the prevalence of psychological distress and co-occurring psychological symptoms among 19-34 years old Finnish university students between the years 2000 and 2012.
The prevalence of perceived frequent psychological symptoms was compared in four nationwide cross-sectional student health surveys with random samples (N=11,502) in the following years: 2000 (N=3,174), 2004 (N=3,153), 2008 (N=2,750), and 2012 (N=2,425).
In the time phase from 2000 to 2012, the overall psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12) increased from 22% to 28%, while there was also an increase in the frequently experienced psychological symptoms (depressiveness from 13% to 15%, anxiety from 8% to 13%, concentration problems from 12% to 18%, and psychological tension from 13% to 18% with a peak prevalence observed in 2008). The co-occurrence of different psychological symptoms increased as well. Psychological distress was more common in females and in older students.
The findings suggest an increasing trend of frequent psychological distress among Finnish university students over the years from 2000 to 2012, with the peak prevalence occurring in 2008, which may reflect the growing multifaceted environmental demands.
PubMed ID
28662321 View in PubMed
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[100,000 more adults visit the dentist: a few results of November 1989]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73759
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
J. Grytten
D. Holst
I. Rossow
O. Vasend
N. Wang
Author Affiliation
Odontologiske Fakultet, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - psychology
Dental Health Services - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe the Norwegian adult population according to: 1. number of teeth present, 2. demand and utilization of dental services, 3. travel time from home to the dentist, 4. dental health behaviour, 5. fear for dental treatment. The analyses were performed on a set of national data collected in 1989, which was representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population 20 years and above. The sample size was 1260 individuals. About 75% of the people had 20 teeth or more present. Nine percent were edentulous. Seventy-seven percent who had demanded dental services during the last year. The average expenditure for dental treatment for those who had demanded the services during the last year was NOK 826. Fifty-three percent travelled 15 minutes or less from home to the dentist. Eighteen percent travelled 30 minutes or more. Almost everybody with their own teeth present brushed their teeth regularly once a day. Thirty-three percent of all dentate people used woodsticks regularly once a day, while 20% used toothfloss regularly. Seventy-five percent had no to mild fear of the dentist, while 7% had a strong fear. Fear of the dentist was higher among women than among men. Fear of the dentist decreased by increasing age. Few people, less than 4%, had cancelled a dental appointment because of dental anxiety. There has been an improvement in dental health and dental health behaviour in Norway during the 1970's and 1980's. These improvements are discussed with special attention paid to the findings from the present study.
PubMed ID
2247358 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Jan 8;133(1):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2013
Author
Willy Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi Universitetet i Oslo, Norway. willy.pedersen@sosgeo.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Jan 8;133(1):33-6
Date
Jan-8-2013
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Coitus
Depression - epidemiology
Humans
Loneliness
Norway
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Social Support
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abstinence from alcohol has been associated with higher mortality than a moderate consumption of alcohol. However, there is evidence to indicate that the abstainers constitute a select group which is exposed to various psychosocial risk factors.
A population-based sample (N=1978) from the study Young in Norway - longitudinal was followed with repeated surveys from their teens until approaching the age of 30. This data set was linked to various registries. The collection of data included their use of alcohol, social integration and symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as sexual behaviour. Data on receipt of social benefits were collected from registries.
At age 21, altogether 211 individuals (10.7%) had remained abstinent from alcohol throughout their entire lives. At age 28, their number had fallen to 93 individuals (4.7%). At age 21, abstinence was associated with weak networks of friends, loneliness and a higher likelihood of not yet having had a sexual debut. At age 28, the abstainers also reported a higher prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression. They were also more frequent recipients of social benefits.
Abstinence from alcohol in adulthood is associated with psychosocial problems and weak integration. These may introduce confounding factors in studies of the health effects of alcohol consumption.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 5;133(5):50123463056
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 5;133(5):50123463055
PubMed ID
23306990 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and mental disorder in the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2301
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
Seltzer, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Arctic Bay
Hysterical dissociation disorder
Paranoid personality disorder
Resolute Bay
Stress, mental
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anomie
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Role
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The phenomenon of acculturation stress is described with particular reference to the subsequent development of the transitional role conflict. The adolescent and young adult male Eskimo is especially susceptible to the anxiety generated by the process of acculturation and it is the interaction of this external stress with the bio-psychosocial characteristics of the individual within his ecological group, that may lead to an increased incidence of mental disorder. The clinical picture that develops will depend on the complex interaction of this psychosocial stressor and the level of ego development and its accompanying defence and coping strategies. We see how the development of manifest psychopathology in two young Inuit males was intimately associated with the stresses of acculturation acting upon personalities characterized by a low self-esteem and negative self-image, feelings of emasculation and a state of anomie. Coping and defensive strategies exhibited both similarities (drugs, alcohol, withdrawal, actin out) and differences (psychosis versus dissociation). The value of modified supportive therapy with continuity of care aimed at increasing self-esteem through sublimation, identification, reduction of dependency and encouragement of growth and autonomy is described, as are measures aimed at primary prevention.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2319.
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Source
J Dent Res. 1999 Mar;78(3):790-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
D. Locker
A. Liddell
L. Dempster
D. Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1999 Mar;78(3):790-6
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Dentist-Patient Relations
Family Health
Humans
Logistic Models
Manifest Anxiety Scale
Memory
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Abstract
Little attention has been given to the issue of the age of onset of dental anxiety, even though it may have a bearing on the origins of this type of fear. This study aimed to identify the age of onset of dental anxiety and to identify differences by age of onset with respect to potential etiological factors, such as negative dental experiences, family history of dental anxiety, and general psychological states. Data were collected by means of two mail surveys of a random sample of the adult population. Of 1420 subjects returning questionnaires, 16.4% were dentally anxious. Half, 50.9%, reported onset in childhood, 22.0% in adolescence, and 27.1% in adulthood. Logistic regression analyses indicated that negative dental experiences were predictive of dental fear regardless of age of onset. A family history of dental anxiety was predictive of child onset only. Adolescent-onset subjects were characterized by trait anxiety and adult-onset subjects by multiple severe fears and symptoms indicative of psychiatric problems. The three groups were similar in terms of their physiological, cognitive, and behavioral responses to dental treatment. However, adolescent- and adult-onset subjects were more hostile toward and less trusting of dentists. These results indicate that child-onset subjects were more likely to fall into the exogenous etiological category suggested by Weiner and Sheehan (1990), while adult-onset subjects were more likely to fall into the endogenous category.
PubMed ID
10096455 View in PubMed
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Age-specific associations between dental fear and dental condition among adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92390
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Oct;66(5):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Pohjola Vesa
Lahti Satu
Vehkalahti Miira M
Tolvanen Mimmi
Hausen Hannu
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. vesa.pohjola@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Oct;66(5):278-85
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Caries - complications - psychology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Loss - complications - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study whether dental condition, measured by numbers of sound, decayed, missing, and restored teeth, was associated with dental fear, and whether age, dental attendance, and/or gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample (n=8,028) comprised Finnish adults aged 30 years and older and the study included people (n=6,335) who participated in a home interview and a clinical dental examination. Dental fear was measured by the question: "How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?" Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between dental fear and dental condition variables, i.e. numbers of decayed, missing, sound, and restored teeth considering the effects of age, attendance, and gender. RESULTS: With the exception of number of restored teeth, all dental condition variables were associated with dental fear. The association between dental fear and number of decayed teeth was positive and was independent of age, gender, and attendance. Age modified the association between dental fear and number of missing and sound teeth. Among the oldest age group, the numbers of missing and sound teeth were positively associated with dental fear while being negatively associated among the youngest age group. CONCLUSIONS: People with high dental fear have poorer dental condition than those with lower fear. Neither gender nor dental attendance affects the association between dental fear and dental condition. The associations between dental fear and numbers of missing and sound teeth vary according to year of birth.
PubMed ID
18720054 View in PubMed
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Alcohol habits in patients with long-term musculoskeletal pain: comparison with a matched control group from the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126074
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2012 Jun;35(2):130-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kerstin Birgitta Thelin Bronner
Peter Wennberg
Håkan Källmén
Marie-Louise Birgitta Schult
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Medicine University Clinic, Smärtrehabiliteringen H 32, Danderyd Hospital AB, 182 88 Stockholm, Sweden. kerstin.thelin-bronner@ds.se
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2012 Jun;35(2):130-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This prospective study aimed to describe alcohol habits in patients with chronic pain compared with those in a matched control group from the general Swedish population. In total, 100 consecutive patients enrolled were matched against 100 individuals in a control group on the basis of age and sex. Alcohol habits were measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test in both groups. The patients were recruited if they underwent a biopsychosocial pain analysis for possible participation in pain rehabilitation. The patients with chronic pain drank alcohol significantly less, less often, in smaller quantities, and became intoxicated less than the control group did. The study was rather small and at a single site, but its strengths were the comprehensive and simple design and the possibility to describe the sample's representativeness compared with other clinics on the basis of data from a national quality register.
PubMed ID
22426438 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use before and during pregnancy: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79922
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(11):1292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Alvik Astrid
Heyerdahl Sonja
Haldorsen Tor
Lindemann Rolf
Author Affiliation
Sogn Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Ulleval University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. astrid.alvik@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(11):1292-8
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few population-based studies have estimated alcohol consumption and binge drinking before and during pregnancy. METHODS: The study is a longitudinal questionnaire study. In Norway, virtually 100% attend an ultrasound screening at 17-18 weeks of pregnancy. In Oslo, a representative sample attending this between June 2000 and May 2001 were invited to join the study, accepted by 92%. Non-Norwegian-speaking and/or immigrants from non-Western countries were not invited; 1,749 (93%) completed the first questionnaire. Measures: T-ACE (screening for pregnancy risk drinking), frequency of alcohol use, Standard Units (SU) per occasion, SU/week, and binge drinking (>or=5 SU per occasion). Binary logistic regression analyses, Student's t-test and Pearson's chi square were used. RESULTS: Alcohol use was reported by 89% pre-pregnancy and by 23% after pregnancy week 12. Binge drinking was reported by 59% pre-pregnancy and by 25% during weeks 0-6. Change of drinking pattern occurred at pregnancy recognition for 85%, although 78% had planned the pregnancy, fetal welfare being the main reason. Participants reporting alcohol use during pregnancy were older, smokers, with more SU/week pre-pregnancy, had some elevated anxiety score, higher income, and a partner with higher education. However, mental health, high income, or education were not predictive of usually drinking 1 SU per occasion or more, and not of binge drinking. The latter was predicted mainly by smoking during pregnancy and being T-ACE positive. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows a drinking pattern before pregnancy recognition that, according to other studies, in 25% or more may cause suboptimal fetal development.
PubMed ID
17091405 View in PubMed
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Anaemia, but not iron deficiency, is associated with clinical symptoms and quality of life in patients with severe heart failure and palliative home care: A substudy of the PREFER trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294209
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2017 Dec; 46:35-40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Kurt Boman
Mona Olofsson
Ann-Charlotte R Bergman
Margareta Brännström
Author Affiliation
Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Skellefteå, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: kurt.boman@vll.se.
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2017 Dec; 46:35-40
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - mortality
Home Care Services
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
ROC Curve
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Abstract
To explore the relationships between anaemia or iron deficiency (ID) and symptoms, quality of life (QoL), morbidity, and mortality.
A post-hoc, non-prespecified, explorative substudy of the prospective randomized PREFER trial. One centre study of outpatients with severe HF and palliative need managed with advanced home care. Associations between anaemia, ID, and the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Euro QoL (EQ-5D), Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questions (KCCQ) were examined only at baseline but at 6months for morbidity and mortality.
Seventy-two patients (51 males, 21 females), aged 79.2±9.1years. Thirty-nine patients (54%) had anaemia and 34 had ID (47%). Anaemia was correlated to depression (r=0.37; p=0.001), anxiety (r=0.25; p=0.04), and reduced well-being (r=0.26; p=0.03) in the ESAS; mobility (r=0.33; p=0.005), pain/discomfort (r=0.27; p=0.02), and visual analogue scale of health state (r=-0.28; p=0.02) in the EQ-5D; and physical limitation (r=-0.27; p=0.02), symptom stability; (r=-0.43; p
PubMed ID
28899603 View in PubMed
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Analysis of stress levels among medical students, residents, and graduate students at four Canadian schools of medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207275
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Nov;72(11):997-1002
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
J A Toews
J M Lockyer
D J Dobson
E. Simpson
A K Brownell
F. Brenneis
K M MacPherson
G S Cohen
Author Affiliation
Continuing Medical Education, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Nov;72(11):997-1002
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Curriculum
Female
Humans
Incidence
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control
Students, Medical - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess stress in medical students, residents, and graduate science students at four Canadian schools of medicine.
Four schools with different curricula in three different parts of Canada participated in the study: the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, the University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine, the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine, and the McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences. All the medical students, residents, and graduate science students at each school were surveyed in 1994-95. The three instruments used were the University of Calgary Stress Questionnaire, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS), and the Symptom Checklist-90. Demographic data were compared across all four schools. Analysis of variance was calculated for all test-item scores, utilizing a four (school) by three (program) by two (gender) design, which were all between subject factors. Significant main effects were followed up by using planned comparisons (Newman-Keuls, with a probability level of p
PubMed ID
9387825 View in PubMed
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372 records – page 1 of 38.