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221 records – page 1 of 23.

[A genetic analysis of A H1N1 pandemic influenza virus in the course of the epidemic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123359
Source
Ter Arkh. 2012;84(3):48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Source
Ter Arkh. 2012;84(3):48-54
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amantadine - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Genetic Testing
Genome, Viral - genetics
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects - genetics
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Oseltamivir - therapeutic use
Pandemics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prognosis
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess genetic variability of A H1N1 pan influenza virus (IV) in the course of the epidemic and to detect a set of human nucleotide polymorphisms responsible for a severe course of the disease.
Extraction and purification of viral genomic RNA from the nasopharyngeal smears and genomic human DNA from the leukocytic fraction of venous blood was made in 230 patients from Moscow. Moscow and Sverdlovsk Regions with severe acute respirator, virus infection (ARVI). A flu virus type was established in amplification reaction with on-line detection of the products with application of primers recommended by WHO. Genetic polymorphisms of A H1N1 pan IV and human genes were determined with minisequencing reaction followed by detection of the products of MALDI-time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Nucleotide sequences of the complete genome were revealed for 15 isolates of A H1N1 pan IV.
A H1N1 IV was identified in 77 cases (46 were pandemic, 31 seasonal). Mutations causing genetically determined resistance to adamants (amantadin, rimantadin) were detected in all 46 samples of genomic RNA of A H1N1 pan IV. Mutation leading to oseltamivir (tamiflu) resistance was found in one sample. It is shown that a severe course of A H1N1 pan IV infection is associated with genotypes predisposing to development of thromboses, bronchopulmonary diseases and hypertention. Genetic tests for prognosis of a complicated course of the flu are proposed. The revealed full-genome sequences of the segments of genomic RNA of 15 A H1N1 pan influenza viruses are deposited in GenBank.
We are the first in Russia to detect a mutant variant of A H1N1 pan IV resistant to oseltamivir We describe a set of nucleotide polymorphisms which determine a complicated course of the flu in patients with identified A H1N1 pan IV.
PubMed ID
22708423 View in PubMed
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[A hantavirus killed an Israeli researcher: hazards while working with wild animals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258692
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Eitan Israeli
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Date
Aug-2014
Language
Hebrew
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Finland - epidemiology
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points - methods
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control - virology
Humans
Mice
Puumala virus - pathogenicity
Rats
Research Personnel
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Abstract
An Israeli researcher working in Finland with Bank Voles, contracted an infectious viral disease and died. This was a rare event, but it is important to learn about this class of viruses and to be aware of the hazards while working in the field in close contact with wild animals. The virus termed Puumala belongs to the genus Hanta from the Bunyaviridae family. The natural reservoir is rodents, mice, rats and Bank Votes for the Puuamala strain. The disease is termed HFRS (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome), is prevalent in Asia and Europe, affecting 200,000 people a year, with 5-15% percent mortality (although in Finland mortality rate is 0.1%). The New World strains cause HPS (hemorrhagic pulmonary syndrome) affecting 200 people a year with 40% mortality. Virus is present in all rodents excretions, and route of infection is by aerosols, hand to mucus membranes contamination, by rodents bites and by contaminated food or water. More than 226 work related infections were documented. Treatment with Ribavirin helps in HFRS but not in HPS. The virus is stable in the environment for long periods, and research must be carried out at biosafety level 3. Working outdoors in rodent infested area, should be carried out using protective clothing, gloves, googles and face mask whenever aerosol producing tasks are performed. Both indoor and outdoor, it is important to adhere to self-hygienic procedures, especially hand washing.
PubMed ID
25286630 View in PubMed
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Alpha interferon therapy in Danish haemophiliac patients with chronic hepatitis C: results of a randomized controlled open label study comparing two different maintenance regimens following standard interferon-alpha-2b treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7628
Source
Haemophilia. 1998 Jan;4(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
A L Laursen
E. Scheibel
J. Ingerslev
N C Clausen
P. Wantzin
L. Ostergaard
G. Schou
F T Black
K. Krogsgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Marselisborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Haemophilia. 1998 Jan;4(1):25-32
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - metabolism
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Hemophilia A - complications
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - drug therapy
Humans
Interferon Alfa-2b - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Following a survey among all Danish haemophiliac patients 49 HIV-negative patients with chronic hepatitis C were offered enrollment in a randomized controlled open label study comparing two different maintenance regimens following standard interferon-alpha-2b treatment. Dose modifications and treatment discontinuation were based upon changes in transaminase levels. Forty-seven patients enrolled received 3 MU of alpha interferon thrice weekly (TIW) for 3 months. Twenty-six nonresponders had their dose increased to 6 MU TIW for an additional 3 months, while 21 responding patients continued on 3 MU TIW. At 6 months, 25 patients with a complete or a partial biochemical response were randomly allocated to either a fixed dose regimen (13 patients) (3 or 6 MU thrice weekly) or an individualized dose regimen (12 patients) tapering interferon dose from 3 or 6 MU by one-third every 2 months if transaminases were persistently normal. The remaining 22 biochemical nonresponders were followed for an additional 6 months without further treatment. After 12 months of treatment, 18 patients (38%) had a virological response, irrespective of regimen, and seven patients (16%) had a sustained virological and biochemical response after 6 months of follow up. Overall, the individualized treatment regimen did not seem to offer any advantage over the fixed dose regimen. The response to alpha interferon treatment in Danish haemophiliac patients with chronic hepatitis C immediately after treatment is comparable to that obtained in previous studies among nonhaemophiliacs. However, a sustained virological and biochemical response was seen in only 16% of treatment patients.
PubMed ID
9873862 View in PubMed
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An Advisory Committee Statement (ACS). National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI). Statement on influenza vaccination for the 1998-1999 season.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203512
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Jul 1;24:1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1998
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1998 Jul 1;24:1-12
Date
Jul-1-1998
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Amantadine - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Industry
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza Vaccines - contraindications - immunology - supply & distribution
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Risk factors
Vaccination - methods - standards
Abstract
The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) provides Health Canada with ongoing and timely medical, scientific, and public-health advice relating to immunization. Health Canada acknowledges that the advice and recommendations set out in this statement are based upon the best current available scientific knowledge, and is disseminating this document for information purposes. Persons administering or using the vaccine should also be aware of the contents of the relevant product monograph(s). Recommendations for use and other information set out herein may differ from that set out in the monograph(s) of the Canadian licensed manufacturer(s) of the vaccine(s). Manufacturer(s) have only sought approval of the vaccine(s) and provided evidence as to its safety and efficacy when used in accordance with the product monographs.
Notes
Erratum In: Can Commun Dis Rep 1998 Jul 15;24(14):120
Erratum In: Can Commun Dis Rep 1998 Oct 15;24(20):168
PubMed ID
10330776 View in PubMed
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Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in chronic hepatitis C virus infection: correlates of positivity and clinical relevance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9397
Source
J Viral Hepat. 2004 Sep;11(5):459-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
L J Yee
P. Kelleher
R D Goldin
S. Marshall
H C Thomas
A. Alberti
M. Chiaramonte
J-H Braconier
A J Hall
M R Thursz
Author Affiliation
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. ylee@edc.pitt.edu
Source
J Viral Hepat. 2004 Sep;11(5):459-64
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Antinuclear - blood
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Autoimmunity
Biopsy
Cell Line
Female
Hepacivirus - classification - genetics - immunology
Hepatitis C, Chronic - drug therapy - immunology - virology
Humans
Interferons - therapeutic use
Liver
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
We examined correlates of antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity (ANA+) in individuals with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the effect of positivity on clinical outcome of HCV. Pretreatment sera from 645 patients from three centres in Sweden (n = 225), the UK (n = 207) and Italy (n = 213) were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence on Hep-2 cells for ANA pattern and titre by a single laboratory. Liver biopsies were all scored by one pathologist. A total of 258 patients were subsequently treated with interferon monotherapy. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of ANA (1:40) by geographic location: Lund 4.4%, London 8.7%, Padova 10.3% [odds ratio (OR) = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.46-0.94; P = 0.023]. Duration of HCV infection, age at infection, current age, route of infection, viral genotype, alcohol consumption, fibrosis stage and inflammatory score were not correlated with ANA+ or ANA pattern. Female gender was correlated with ANA+ and this association persisted in multivariable analyses (OR = 3.0; P = 0.002). Increased plasma cells were observed in the liver biopsies of ANA-positive individuals compared with ANA-negative individuals, while a trend towards decreased lymphoid aggregates was observed [hazard ratio (HR) = 9.0, P = 0.037; HR = 0.291, P = 0.118, respectively]. No correlations were observed between ANA positivity and nonresponse to therapy (OR = 1.4; P = 0.513), although ANA+ was correlated with faster rates of liver fibrosis, this was not statistically significant (OR = 1.8; P = 0.1452). Low titre ANA+ should not be a contraindication for interferon treatment. Our observation of increased plasma cells in ANA+ biopsies might suggest B-cell polyclonal activity with a secondary clinical manifestation of increased serum immunoglobulins.
PubMed ID
15357653 View in PubMed
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Antiretroviral medication use among injection drug users: two potential futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197911
Source
AIDS. 2000 Jun 16;14(9):1229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2000
Author
E. Wood
M T Schechter
M W Tyndall
J S Montaner
M V O'Shaughnessy
R S Hogg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
AIDS. 2000 Jun 16;14(9):1229-35
Date
Jun-16-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - mortality
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To model the potential impact of HIV infection rates and the use of antiretroviral medication on life expectancy and mortality in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from 1999 to 2006.
Population projections were made to estimate the population of the Downtown Eastside in the year 2006.
Two scenarios were modelled to predict the impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral use on mortality and life expectancy. The use of antiretroviral therapy was estimated to be 80% in the first scenario and 20% in the second. The prevalence of HIV by age and sex, and by year infected was estimated using data from the Vancouver Injection Drug User Study.
If the level of antiretroviral therapy use among HIV-positive individuals was 80% at baseline, then we estimate that the life expectancy at birth in the year 2006 will be 60.8 years for men and 72.8 years for women, and 172 AIDS deaths will occur between 1999 and 2006. In contrast, if the present level of antiretroviral medication use persists, the life expectancy at birth in the year 2006 will be 56.9 years for men and 68.6 years for women, and 503 AIDS deaths will occur between 1999 and 2006.
Our analysis suggests that if the low levels of antiretroviral therapy use persist, life expectancy in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside will soon be on a par with many of the world's least developed countries. Our findings highlight the large health status decline that can be expected in many inner city neighbourhoods if low levels of antiretroviral use persist. Although reasonable coverage targets for injection drug users (IDU) have not been established, the expanded use of antiretroviral medication is urgently needed to avert a drastic decline in health status.
PubMed ID
10894288 View in PubMed
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Antiviral therapy and outcomes of influenza requiring hospitalization in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159386
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Dec 15;45(12):1568-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2007
Author
Allison McGeer
Karen A Green
Agron Plevneshi
Altynay Shigayeva
Nilofar Siddiqi
Janet Raboud
Donald E Low
Author Affiliation
Toronto Medical Laboratories and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5 Canada. amcgeer@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Dec 15;45(12):1568-75
Date
Dec-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the impact of antiviral therapy on outcomes of patients hospitalized with influenza in southern Ontario, Canada.
Patients admitted to Toronto Invasive Bacterial Diseases Network hospitals with laboratory-confirmed influenza from 1 January 2005 through 31 May 2006 were enrolled in the study. Demographic and medical data were collected by patient and physician interview and chart review. The main outcome evaluated was death within 15 days after symptom onset.
Data were available for 512 of 541 eligible patients. There were 185 children (
Notes
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2008 May 15;46(10):1628-9; author reply 1629-3018419504
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Apr 15;46(8):1323-418444878
PubMed ID
18190317 View in PubMed
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Appropriate prophylaxis with restrictive palivizumab regimen in preterm children in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30061
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Nov;93(11):1470-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
L. Navér
M. Eriksson
U. Ewald
A. Linde
M. Lindroth
J. Schollin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Division of Paediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. lars.naver@klinvet.ki.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Nov;93(11):1470-3
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: Palivizumab (Synagis) was registered in Sweden in 1999 for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in premature infants. The high costs and the limited knowledge of the efficacy of this substance have led to debate about how and when it should be used. National guidelines for the use of palivizumab in Sweden were constructed in the year 2000. The aim of this study was to evaluate the guidelines. METHODS: A nation-wide prospective study was conducted during the two RSV seasons of the years 2000-2002. The paediatric departments in Sweden reported the use of palivizumab, the indication for its use, and the number of infants born preterm before 36 wk of gestation and less than 2 y old who were admitted to hospital for RSV infection. RESULTS: During the two seasons, 218 (3.8%) children who were born before 36 wk of gestation, and 97 (5.4%) who were born before 33 wk, were hospitalized because of RSV infection. Five children were treated with mechanical ventilation. No death caused by RSV was reported. A total of 390 children were treated with palivizumab, and 16 (4.1%) of those who received prophylactic treatment were admitted to hospital with RSV infection. CONCLUSION: We consider the comparatively restrictive Swedish recommendations to be safe and recommend that palivizumab should also be used very restrictively in the future. In our opinion, palivizumab in preterm children could be recommended only for those with chronic lung disease younger than 1 y of age, and with active treatment for their disease.
PubMed ID
15513574 View in PubMed
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221 records – page 1 of 23.